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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

ANNUAL 

TOWN 
REPORT 



c p 




Byam Road, February 8th, 1978 - 11:00a.m. 



CHELMSFORD 

1978 



IN MEMORIUM 



ARNAUD BLACKADAR 

Board of Selectmen March - 7, 1949 - March 3, 1952 
Town Accountant - November 16, 1967 - October 31, 1975 



JOHN CAMPBELL 

Patrolman, Chelmsford Police Dept. 
May 26, 1959 - February 8, 1978 



MICHAEL DEVINE 

Board of Registrars - April 24, 1973 - September 26, 1978 

BRUNO GRESKA 

Laborer, Highway Department, 
July 6, 1959 - March 1, 1978 



ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

Town of Chelmsford 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 



1978 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Incorporated May, 1655 

Type of Government Town Meeting 

Location: Eastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lowell and Tyngsborough 

on the North, Billerica on the East, Carlisle on the South, and 
Westford on the West. It is 24 miles from Boston, 40 miles 
from Worcester, and 225 miles from New York City. 

County: Middlesex 

Land Area: 22.54 Square Miles 

Population, 1975: 31,749 

Density, 1970: 1 ,394 persons per square mile 

Assessed Valuation 1978 $269,053,375 (Real Estate) 

$ 10,689,900 (Personal Property) 

Tax Rate: $57.50 

United States Senators in Congress: 

5th Congressional District Paul T. Tsongas, Lowell 

State Senator Carol C. Amick, Bedford 

Representative in General Court: 

43rd Middlesex District Bruce N. Freeman, 

Chelmsford- Precincts 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12 

45th Middlesex District Philip L. Shea, Lowell-Precincts 2 & 7 

47th Middlesex District Edward LeLacheur, Lowell -Precincts 4 & 11 



Accounting Department Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. 

Assessors Office Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. 

Monday Evening 7:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 
Building Inspector Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. 

Board of Health Monday thru Friday 8: 30 a .m . 

Highway Department 

Office Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. 

Garage Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. 

Public Libraries 

Adams Library Monday thru Thursday 9:00 a.m. 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. 

Childrens' House Monday thru Thursday 9:00 a.m. 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. 

McKay Library Monday thru Thursday 9:00 a.m. 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m 

School Superintendent Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. 

Selectmen's Office Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. 

Town Clerk Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 
Tax Collector & Treasurer Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m 

(Except June, July & August) 
Veterans Agent Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. 



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Annual Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Selectmen 
School Committee 
Planning Board 
Appeals Board 
Conservation Commission 
Board of Health 
Housing Authority 



MEETINGS 

First Saturday in April 

Last Monday in April 

Monday-7:30 p.m. 

Tuesday-8:00 p.m. 

7:30 p.m. -2nd & 4th Wed. every month 

7:30 p.m. -4th Thurs. every month 

8:00 p.m. -1st & 3rd Tues. every month 

7:30 p.m. -2nd & 4th Mon. every month 

7:30 p.m. -1st Tues. every month 



12 Precincts 

Town Hall 
High School 
Town Hall 
Town Hall 
Town Hall 
Town Hall 
1 Smith Street 



ELECTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Moderator 

Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. 

(Term Expires- 1981) 

Town Clerk 

Mary E. St.Hilaire 
(Term Expires-1981) 

Board of Selectmen 

Philip L. Currier Term expired 1978 

William R. Murphy Term expires 1979 

Arnold J. Lovering Term expires 1980 

Paul C. Hart Term expires 1980 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr. Term expires 1980 

John W. Carson Term expires 1981 

Treasurer & Tax Collector 

Philip J. McCormack 
(Term expires-1981) 

Board of Assessors 

Julian H. Zabierek Term expires 1979 

Ruth K. Delaney Term expires 1980 

Janet Lombard Term expires 1981 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Everett V. Olsen Term expires 1979 

Gerald L. Hardy Term expires 1980 

Arthur J. Colmer Term expires 1981 

Chelmsford Housing Authority 

Ruth K. Delaney Term expires 1980 

Richard L. Monahan Term expires 1981 

Robert A. Sheridan Term expires 1982 

Robert L. Hughes Term expires 1983 

Board of Health 

Paul F. McCarthy Term expires 1979 

PaulJ. Canniff Term expires 1980 

Peter Dulchinos Term expires 1981 

Nashoba Valley Technical Vocational 
School District 

Stratos Dukakis Term expired 1978 

Luois E. Kelly Term expires 1979 

Jay M. Knox Term expires 1980 

Randolph W. Brumagim Term expires 1980 

Donald P. Ayer Term expires 1981 

Park Commissioners 

Bradford O. Emerson Term expires 1979 

J. Joan Schenk Term expires 1980 

Arthur L. Bennett Term expires 1981 



School Committee 



Planning Board 

A. Robert Raab 
Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 
Carolyn Fenn 
Charles A. Parlee 
Ann McCarthy 
Paul F. Bartel 
Eugene Gilet 
Thomas E. Firth, Jr. 



Resigned 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1 980 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1981 
Term expires 1981 



Harry A. Foster 
Myra Silver 
Stanley W. Norkunas 
William Sharpley, Jr. 
Carol Cleven 
John W. Peters 



Term expired 1978 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1981 
Term expires 1981 



Sewer Commission 
TheodoreJ. Rapallo Term expired 1978 

Matthew J. Doyle Term expires 1979 

Charles L. Weaver Term expires 1980 

DennisJ. Ready Term expires 1981 

Trustees of Public Libraries 



Roger P. Welch 
James M. Geary 
Dennis E. McHugh 
David E. Kelch 
Elizabeth A. McCarthy 
Howard K. Moore 
Mary C. Phelan 



William E. Spence 



Myles Hogan 
Donald P. Gray 



Constable 



Tree Warden 



Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1981 
Term expires 1981 
Resigned 



Term expires 1980 



Term expired 1978 
Term expires 1981 



Varney Playground Commissioners 

Elected at Town Meeting 

Robert C. McManimon Term expires 1979 

HarryJ. Ayotte Term expires 1981 

Bernard Battle Term expires 1980 

APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS 



Town Accountant 

Ernest F. Day Term expires 1979 

Board of Selectmans Administrative Assistant 

Evelyn M. Haines Term expires 1979 

Town Counsel 

James M. Harrington Term expires 1979 



Chief of Police 
Robert E. Germann 



Fire Chief 
Frederick H. Reid 



Cemetery Superintendent 

George E. Baxendale Term expires 1979 

Park Superintendent 

Donald P. Gray Term expires 1979 

Director of Public Health 

Thomas W. Morris Term expires 1979 

Board of Health Physician 

Michael A. Gilchrist, M.D. Term expires 1979 

Superintendent of Streets 

Louis R. Rondeau Term expires 1979 



Special Constable 

Armand Soucy Walter McAvoy 

Inspector of Animals 

Dr. Martin A. Gruber Term expires 1979 

Building Inspector 

Peter J. McHugh, Jr. Term expires 1980 

Gas Inspector 

Neal C. Stanley Term expires 1979 

Plumbing Inspector Intermittent Plumbing Inspector 

William H. Shedd Richard M. Kelly 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Anthony C. Ferreira 

Town Aide & Council on Aging 

Kathleen Robinson 



Assistant Town Clerk 

Elizabeth Zamanakos 



Assistant Assessors 

Evelyn M. Philbrook 



Assistant Treasurer 

Florence M. Ramsay 



Planning Board Clerk 

Judith E. Carter 



Zoning Appeal Board Clerk 

Velma Munroe 



Veteran's Grave Officer 

George E. Baxendale Term expires 1979 

Wiring Inspector 
Harold M. Tucke, Jr. 



Recreation Director 

James R. Crocker 



Town Planner 

Steve McDonald 



Finance Committee 

Kathryn E. Hughes Term expires 1979 

James A. Decker Term expires 1979 

George Ripsom Term expires 1980 

Thomas F. Markham, Jr. Term expires 1980 

Marvin Schenk Term expired 1978 

William Edge Term expires 1981 

Richard Sullivan Term expired 1978 



Louise Bishop Kathleen Robinson 

Clarence Dane William Marson 

Sara Dunigan Lillian Gould 

H. Chadbourne Ward 

Lowell Drug Treatment "SHARE" 

Donald Butler Marion Yonge 

Cable Television Advisory Committee 



Richard Arcand 
R.D. Cavallair 
Robert McAdam 
Harold Witt 



Robert Brooks 
Stan Norkunas 
Chris Tournas 
Allen W. Fritz 



John W. Carson 



Youth Center Advisory Committee 



Janet Greeno 
George Weinert 
Judy Harrison 
JoAnn Weisman 
Everett Brown 
Jay Finnegan 
Norman Doulgas 



Joanne Weinert 



Wendell Luke 

Joseph Shanahan 

Phillis Dougherty 

Trudy Wall 

Martha Doukszewicz 

Ronald Cannistraro 

Robert Hall 



Brian Sullivan 



Alternates 



Vincent Harrison 



Youth Center Coordinator 

James R. Woodman (resigned) 



Peter Saulis 



Historical Commission 

Richard Lahue Term expires 1979 

Bertha Trubey Term expires 1980 

John Hamilton Term expires 1980 

Emile Dumont Term expires 1980 

J. Perry Richardson Term expires 1981 

George Parkhurst Term expires 1981 

Jane Drury Term expires 1981 

Historic District Commission 



Jeanne L. Parlee 
J. Perry Richardson 
Robert LaPorte, Jr. 
Richard Lahue, Sr. 
Dr. Paul Canniff 
Stephen Wojcik 



Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1981 
Term expires 1981 
Resigned 



S. Robert Monaco 
Robert Kydd 
Marshall Arkin 
Carolyn Bennett 
Charles Higgins 
Florence Kelley 
Daniel Burke 



Zoning Appeal Board 



Alternates 



Term expired 
Term expired 
Term expires 
Term expires 
Term expires 
Term expires 
Term expires 



1978 
1978 
1980 
1980 
1981 
1981 
1981 



Alternates 

Joseph Dappal Michael Erhartic 

Denis Valdinocci 



Gula Boyce 
Christina Ahern 



Council on Aging 



Mary McAuliffe 
Edna Nelson 



J. Harold Davis 
Charles Watt, Sr. 



Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1979 



Fence Viewers 

Reginald Furness, Esq. Richard D. Harper 

Highway Administrative Ass't. 
Pearl Koulas 

CETA Coordinator 

Frank Lindsley 

Veteran's Agent 

Mary McAuliffe 



Director Veterans Services 

William R. Murphy 

Veteran's Emergency Fund Committee 

Alfred Coburn Peter Saulis 

Victor Fetro Melvin dejager 

James Walker Herbert Knutson 

John McNulty Gerard Vayo 

Thomas Ennis Geroge Waite 

Dr. Albert Willis (resigned) Charles Jangraw 

Personnel Board 

Carl A. Olsson (resigned) Term expired 1978 

DavidJ. McLachlan Term expires 1979 

Walter L. Kivlan, III Term expires 1979 

Michael L. Fabien (resigned) Term expires 1980 



Recreation Commission 



Paul Murphy 
Joan Murray 
Robert Charpentier 
Harry Ayotte 
Anthony Bruno 



Thomas Trainor 

Bette Ressel 

Ronald Mosher 

Jack Bilodeau 

Bruce MacDonald 



Summer Director: Donald Babin 
Assistant: Evelyn Newman 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 

Denis Valdinocci Catherine Siminatore 

Richard Burtt Mary Duff 

Jean- Paul Gravell Charles Spear 

Robert J. Munroe, Sr. 



Richard Sullivan NET Rep. 

Capital Planning & Budgeting Comm. 



Ernest Day 
Edward Krasnecki 



Ira Parks 
Thomas Firth 



Civil Defense Committee 



Walter Hedlund 
Sgt. Walter Edwards 
George Dixon 
George Brown 



Donald Savage 



William Edge 
Joseph Staveley 

Joseph Maher 
Melvin dejager 



Conservation Commission 



Charles Parlee 
Donald House 
John Balco 
David Merrill 
John McCormack 
Frank Siraco 
Edward Duffy 
Judith Haas 



Term expired 1978 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1981 
Term expires 1981 



Community Teamwork 

Alice Gossett 

East Chelmsford Fire Station 
Building Committee 



Edward Quinn 
Frederick Reid 



George Dixon 



Walter Hedlund 
Edward Hoyt 



Weighers of Merchandise 



FrancisJ. Sakalinski 
Joseph Bobola 
Alex Coluchi 
Marcel Marion 
Alejandrino Quiles 



Bill Bullick 



Ted Magiera 

Paul Westwood 

Charles Hacking 

Lillian Cabana 

Tom Long 



Environmental Advisory Council 

Ina Greenblatt Michael Zymaris 

Dr. Ethel Kamien Gene Roberts 

Diane Lewis Gerald Locker 

Donald Caless Mary Wadman 



Town Celebration Committee 



Walter Hedlund 
Raymond Day 



James Gifford 
Dana Caffelle 



Board of Registrars 

Carl A. Olsson Term expires 1979 

Edward Hilliard Term expires 1980 

Herbert F. Bennett Term expires 1981 

Michael Devine Deceased 

Mary E. St.Hilaire-Ex-Officio 

911 Telephone Committee 

William Murphy Board of Selectmen Rep. 

Frederick Reid Fire Dept. Rep. 

James Greska Police Dept. Rep. 

Walter Hedlund Civil Defense 

Raymond Gourdeau Medic Ambulance 

Jordan Ulery Medic Ambulance 



Drug — Tobacco Study Committee 

Joseph Shanahan Carol Cleven 

Jay Finnegan Don Butler 

U.N. Day Chairman 
W. Allen Thomas 



Grace Auger 
Helen Chafe 
Janet O'Connor 
Irene Corsetti 
M.Joan Dillon 



Estelle Abely 
Loretta Weaver 

Dog Officer 

Frank Wojtas 



School Crossing Guards 



Jean B. McPhail 



Alternates 



Karen C. Flynn 
George Johnson 
Halvar Peterson 
Carol Souza 
L. Diane Zebny 



M. Cynthia Abely 
Nancy Dufresne 

Ass't Dog Officer 
Stacia Wojtas 



Auxiliary Police Officers 

James A. Ernst Alan W. Grekula 

Bradford E. Poole Richard Demers 

Richard W. Turnbull Anne L. Grekula 



Police Matrons 



Grace Auger 
Nora Clifford 



Mary Long 
Emily Peake 



Police Implementation Advisory Committee 

Rev. Walter Sobol Roger Abernathy 

Cynthia Teele Edward Marshall 

Donald Butler Ray McCusker 

Helena Tripp Samuel Parks 

Paul C. Hart Daniel Sullivan 

Robert Germann Marie J. Geary 

Department Public Works Study Committee 

Joan Schenk George Auchy 

Gerald Silver Henry McClean 

Barbara Langworthy Robert Monroe, Sr. 

Richard Russell William R. Murphy 

Custodian of Public Buildings 

Patrick Murtagh Town Hall 

John P. Curran Police Station 

Industrial Development Financing Authority 

Gerald Wallace Bradford O. Emerson 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr. 

Marvin Schenk (resigned) James Decker 

Labor Relations Advisory 

Murphy, Lamere & Murphy 

Comprehensive Permitting Committee 

Donald House Paul Canniff 

Peter J. McHugh John W. Carson 

Henrick Johnson Carol Start 

Daniel Burke 



Four C's Committee 

Alice Gossett 

Handicapped & Elderly Rides Committee 

Cindy Miller Kathleen Robinson 

John Donahue Susan Donahue 

Roger Welch Joseph Potzka 

Phyllis Dougherty Martin Ames 

Update Town History 

Charlotte DeWolf Charles Watt, Sr. 

Julia Fogg Frederick Burne 

Sign Advisory Committee 

Jean Rook Term expires 1980 

Deborah Dion Term expires 1980 

Charles Marderosian Term expires 1981 

Mitchell Korbey Term expires 1979 

Carolyn Bennett Term expires 1979 

Suzanne Reade Term expires 1979 



Safety Committee 



Chief Reid 
Louis Rondeau 



Chief Germann 
William Murphy 



Public Works Advisory Council 

William R. Murphy Robert J. Monroe 

J. Joan Schenk John McCormack 

Paul Murphy Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 

Henry McClean Paul McCarthy 

Matthew Doyle Donald Gray 

James J. McKeown 



Town Wide Cultural Committee 



Marie Geary 
Mary Guaraldi 
William Hynes 
Mitchell Korbey 
Irene Meaney 



Fredrica M. Scutt 



Chris Simorellis 

Miriam Ward 

Paul Ward 

Ethel F. ReSavage 

Dennis E. McHugh 



Memorial Day Committee 

Harry F. Silveria Post 212 

Donald House 

Elmer Crowell Post 3 1 3 

Alfred Ryan 

Timothy O'Connor Post 366 

Manuel Sousa 

HUD Flood Insurance Program Committee 

John Balco Mary Pease 

Carolyn Fenn Paul Bienvenu 

Marshall Arkin 



Ration Board 

Charles Koulas Paul MacMillan 

Arnold Lovering 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



At the Board's Organizational Meeting on April 3, 
1978, following the Annual Town Election. William R. 
Murphy was elected as Chairman of the Board. Other 
members of the Board are: Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr., 
Vice-Chairman; John Carson, Clerk; Arnold J. Lovering 
and Paul C. Hart. 

Highlights of the year's activities are included in the 
following paragraphs: 

On February 7, 1978 it became necessary to declare a 
State of Emergency in the Town due to the blizzard. The 
Army Corps of Engineers responded to our request for 
assistance in clearing of the roadways. A State of 
Emergency was declared by the Governor and most Town 
residents were unable to travel to and from work for five 
days. The Civil Defense and Auxiliary Police worked 
around the clock transporting individuals to their places 
of employment so that essential services could be provid- 
ed, as well as providing emergency supplies to Town 
residents. 

A new bargaining unit was established under the 
jurisdiction of the Board of Selectmen whereby the Clerks 
and Town Hall Custodians voted to unionize. After many 
months of negotiations, the Board executed a 3-year con- 
tract agreement between the Town and the Clerks and 
Custodians. 

The Town-Wide mandatory Recycling Program was 
implemented during the month of April. Due to change 
in the market for mixed glass and cans, this program was 
suspended in May, at which time the Board made a com- 
mitment to review the Recycling Program and possibly 
implement a voluntary program. The Town did continue 
to pick up newspaper on a monthly basis. 

In a continuing effort to alleviate drainage problems 
throughout the Town, contracts were awarded and com- 



pleted for drainage construction in the following areas: 
North Road at Linwood Street, Janet Road, Swain Road, 
Dunstable Road, and High Street, as well as many other 
small drainage problems which were corrected by the 
Highway Department. 

In conjunction with the sidewalk construction pro- 
gram, contracts were awarded and sidewalks completed 
on the following streets: Chelmsforrd Street, Dalton 
Road, Summer Street, and Wildes Road. The following 
sidewalks should be completed in the Spring of 1979: Mill 
Road, Stedman Street, Graniteville Road and Westford 
St. 

Under the provision of Chapter 356 of the Acts of 1 977 , 
Chelmsford was one of 24 communities selected from 140 
applicants for the construction of a Salt Storage Shed to 
be funded by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts advertised for bids and 
as a result, construction of the shed at the Swain Road 
Landfill Facility should be completed in Spring of 1979. 

After many months of delay, the Senior Citizens Drop- 
In Center on Mill Road was officially opened in June. 
Funds for this project were obtained from the Depart- 
ment of Housing and Urban Development, in the amount 
of $43,000. 

Robert Sheehan Associates of Medway completed its 
evaluation of the Police Department and furnished a 
written report with recommendations. Upon receipt of 
this report, the Board appointed a Police Implementa- 
tion Advisory Committee to review it and comments by 
the Chief; review the Chiefs implementation report; and 
to review implementation efforts. The Committee did 
review these materials and furnished recommendations to 
implement changes in the Police Department. Many of 
the recommendations will require funding, and as a 



result, the Police Department 1979-80 budget will in- 
clude additional monies in order to properly effect these 
changes. 

Through a Town Meeting vote the Town has been 
authorized to convey the Emerson Property on North 
Road to Dr. and Mrs. L. Rodger Currie for the sum of 
$120,775. The purchase price will be applied to the 
renovation of McFarlin School 'A' Building on Billerica 
Road for municipal purposes. 

The Board participated in the Town Government Day 
in May, sponsored by the Chelmsford Lodge of Elks and 
the Chelmsford School Department. It is hoped that this 
program will be continued as it is an educational process 
for High School students to understand and participate in 
the operations of Town government. 

Chelmsford was faced with a serious problem on 
November 30th and December 6th when no quorum 
could be obtained to conduct a Special Town Meeting. 
The Special Town Meeting was essential in view of the 
fact that approval had to be obtained for the Chelmsford 
Housing Authority to commence construction at the 
McFarlin School 'B' Building of more housing units for 
the elderly, funded by the State. Several other important 
articles also had to be approved or disapproved. As a 
result of this lack of interest, the Board is considering 
placing an article on the Annual Town Meeting Warrant 
reducing the quorum requirement. 

The Community still employs eligible participants 
under the CETA Program. There are some 34 employees 
working in the Community under this program. 

At the Annual Town Meeting, $5,000 was ap- 
propriated to engage an outside consultant to review and 
furnish recommendations relative to our insurance needs. 
The firm of Betterley Risk Consultants was selected, and 
is in the process of reviewing all our policies. Upon com- 
pletion of this evaluation, they will furnish a written 
report to the Board. 

In order to comply with Revenue Sharing Regulations, 
an audit of all municipal accounts commenced early in 
December. The audit task is being completed by the 
Department of Corporations and Taxation Division of 
Accounts. 

The Board has continued its active role in the 
Massachusetts Selectmens' Association, Merrimack 
Valley Selectmens' Association, Middlesex County Ad- 
visory Board, and Massachusetts League of Cities and 
Towns. It should be noted that John W. Carson was 
elected a member of the Board of Directors of the Mid- 
dlesex County Selectmens' Association. 

Walter Edwards, Sergeant in the Police Department, 
was nominated and chosen by the Selectmen as the year's 
Outstanding Municipal Employee. 

After 21 years of service to the Town, Robert E. Ger- 
mann, Chief of Police, submitted his letter of retirement 
to the Board of Selectmen effective January 11, 1979. As 
a result of this notification the Selectmen appointed 
James Greska as acting Chief, and Walter Edwards Ac 
ting Deputy Chief. 

Due to the resignation of A. Robert Raab, the Select- 
men met with the remaining members of the Planning 



Board and jointly appointed Charles A. Parlee to fill this 
vacancy. Also, due to the resignation of Mary Claire 
Phelan, the Selectmen met with the remaining members 
of the Library Trustees and jointly appointed David E. 
Kelch o fill this vacancy. 

We wish to take this opportunity to commend Depart- 
ments, Committees, Commissions and Boards for their 
accomplishments during this past year. 



TOWN CLERK 

Mary E. St. Hilaire, Town Clerk 
Elizabeth Delaney Zamanakos, Ass't Town Clerk 

LICENSES AND VITAL RECORDS 



Sporting 
Licenses 


Dog 

Licenses 


Kennel 
Licenses 


Marriage 
Intentions 


Recorded 
Mortgages, etc. 


1576 


2543 


12 


253 


548 



Births 
(Incomplete) 

287 



Deaths 



177 



Marriages 
329 



1978 JURORS DRAWN 



The following names were drawn from the 1977-1978 



list. 

3 
37 
98 
33 

6 
52 
80 
48 
55 
66 
20 

7 
82 
13 
34 
83 
22 
58 
45 

5 
29 
75 
47 
49 
50 
100 



1-23 
1-23 
1-23 
1-23 
1-23 
1-23 
2-24 



-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 
-78 



15-78 



2 
46 
51 
62 
44 
35 
17 
28 
43 
69 
99 
36 
54 
38 
71 
10 
26 
11 
56 
57 
65 

8 
39 
70 
89 
64 
23 
14 



5-22-78 
5-22-78 
5-22-78 
5-22-78 
5-20-78 
5-20-78 
7-24-78 
7-24-78 
7-24-78 
7-24-78 
7-24-78 
8-24-78 
8-24-78 
8-24-78 



8-24 



78 



-78 
-78 
-78 

-78 



8-24- 

9-25- 

9-25- 

9-25- 

9-25-78 

9-25-78 
10-18-78 
10-18-78 
10-18-78 
10-18-78 
10-18-78 
10-18-78 
10-18-78 



10 



1977-1978 JURY LIST 



Name and Address 



Occupation 



1. JOHNR. ABBOTT, 159 Dunstable Rd. 

2. ROBERT E. ACHESON, 26 School St. 

3. MARY R. ALLABY, 20 Marina Rd. 

4. NEIL J. ANDERSON, 23 Muriel Rd. 

5. THELMA ANTONOPOULOS, 3 New Fletcher St. 

6. ROBERTJ. ARCHAMBAULT, 19 Mission Rd. 

7. ARLAND A. ATKINS, 171 Mill Rd. 

8. DOMCIA M. AZAROWSKI, 14 Gorham St. 

9. JEAN M. BAGSHAW, 16 Ideal Ave. 

10. CHARLES E. BALLANTINE, 31 Golden Cove Rd. 

11. AGNES T. BARON, 19 Gail St. 

12. MONICA BARRON, 11 Edgelawn Ave. 

13. ROBERT C. BEALS, 12 Rack Rd. 

14. CONRAD G. BEAUPRE, 15 Coolidge St. 

15. MARION M. BENNETT, 152 Dalton Rd. 

16. JOHN R. BIRO, 162 Main St. 

17. EVELYN M. BOHL, 4 Green Valley Dr. 

18. LEO A. BOUCHER, 30 Ruthellen Rd. 

19. JANICE R. BRIGHAM, 11 Bentley Lane 

20. BARBARA H. BROE, 14 Singlefoot Rd. 

21. ERVINJ. BROWN, 12 Pine St. 

22. MARJORIE E. BROWN, 19 Cedar St. 

23. DONALD J. BYAM, 40 Sleigh Rd. 

24. STEWART H. CADY, 180 Tyngsboro Rd. 

25. DANIEL F. CALLAHAN, 18 Arbor Rd. 

26. BETSEY B. CAMBELL, 1 Smith St.-Apt. 116A 

27. MARIE V. CARIGNAN, 159 Tyngsboro Rd. 

28. KAREN H. CARPENTER, 134 Boston Rd. 

29. FRANCIS M. CARRICK, 13 Carleton Ave. 

30. JUNE L. CHAGNON, 4 Pine Hill Rd. 

31 . HERBERT A. CHILDS, 9 Rivermeadow Dr. 

32. EVELYN G. CHRISTIANSEN, 12 Thomas Dr. 

33. BERNARD V. CLARK, 11 Sharon Ave. 

34. MARY G. CLARK, 27 Rainbow Ave. 

35. ALICE G. CO ALTER, 25 Quigley Ave. 

36. WILLARD S. COLBY, 61 Amble Rd. 

37. IRENE H. COLLINS, 11 Chestnut Hill Rd. 

38. JEAN CONNELL, 9 Rainbow Ave. 

39. JEANETTE E. COOPER, 16 Longmeadow Rd. 

40. KENNETH J. CORCORAN, 201 Dalton Rd. 

41. CELINE F. COSTELLO, 75 Proctor Rd. 

42. HELENA G. COUTO, 66 Meadowbrook Rd. 

43. FRANCIS X. COYLE, 21 Chatham Rd. 

44. FREDERICKJ. CRONIN, 50 Grandview Rd. 

45. HARLD J. DAVIS, 6 Pine Hill Ave. 

46. MARION DEMPSEY, 5 Skyview Dr. 

47. ELAINE B. DIONNE, 9 Anise Rd. 

48. WILLIAM F.DONAHUE, JR., 8 Julio St. 

49. JOHN E. DUBEY, JR. 45 Dunstan Rd. 

50. JAMES J. DURKIN,JR., 8 McFarlin Rd. 

51. FRANCIS E. EGAN, 23 Sprague Ave. 

52. ANTHONY FAFALIOS, 11 Janet Rd. 

53. DONALD J. FIDLER, 34 North Rd. 

54. JOHNF. FLYNN, 14NaylorSt. 

55. ERIC C. FOSTER, 13 Manwell Rd. 

56. KATHLEEN A. GAUDETTE, 41 Walnut St. 

57. SUSAN GEORGE, 30 Second St. 

58. MARY E. GILIKSON, 270 Littleton Rd. 

59. EDWARD H. HARHAUSEN, 9 Manhattan Dr. 



Carpenter 

Machinist 

Manager 

Teamster 

Housewife 

Supervisor Sp. 

Opt. Eng. 

Stitcher 

Secretary 

Cinematographer 

Housewife 

Adm. Asst 

Engineer 

Unemployed 

Housewife 

Engineer 

Therapist 

Accountant 

Secretary 

Housewife 

Jeweler 

Wire Solderer 

Presser 

Laborer 

Asst Plant Mgr 

Retired 

Creeler 

Consultant 

Superv. 

Housewife 

Div. Sale Mgr 

Housewife 

Foundry Worker 

Buyer 

Packer 

Serv Rep. 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Asst Serv Mgr 

Housewife 

Bank Clerk 

Mathmatician 

Accountant 

Retired 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Exec Asst 

Selfemployed 

Mgr 

Bricklayer 

Baker 

Comp Opr 

Minister 

Plumber 

Soldered 

Clerk 

Trimmer 

Chief Eng 



11 



60. JOHN F. HAYES, 3 Churchill Rd. 

61. FRED C. HEINTZ, 7 Ruthellen Rd. 

62. JOHN P. HICKEY, 23 Bradford Rd. 

63. RUTH E. HINDLE, 12 Sunrise Ave. 

64. HOWARD G. HUNTER, 8 Herbert Rd. 

65. RANDY KEATING, 35 Vinal Sq. 

66. HARLAN P. KELLY, 10 Hildreth St. 

67. ELIZABETH B. KEY, 15 Berkeley Dr. 

68. ROBERT B. KNOWLES, 40 Walnut Rd. 

69. PAULKRENITSKY, 12 Draycoach Rd. 

70. JOSEPH A. LaTOUCHE, 196 North Rd. 

71. ANN LEACH, Richardson Apts. Bll, Richardson Rd. 

DONALD MacPHAIL, 180 Tyngsboro Rd. 

ROBERT MATILAND, 270 Littleton Rd. 

GEORGE T. MANSUR, 54 Old Stage Rd. 

FREDERICK L. MAYS, JR., 10 Walnut Rd. 

EDWARD J. McNULTY, 20 Freeman Rd. 



77. ROSA E. MELLOW, 71 Brick Kiln Rd. 

78. LINDA L. MILLER, 26 Parlee Rd. 

79. MARY B. MORAIS, 18 Castlewood Dr. 

80. NORMAND L. MORRISSETTE, 11 Stoneybrook Rd. 

81 . FRANCES A. MULLEN, 350 Boston Rd. 

82. ALLEN D. NELSON, SR., 5 Hidden Way 

83. JOHN J. NICOLI, 8 Clark Ave. 

84. WILLIAM PIERRO, 13 Walnut Rd. 

85. GEORGE W. P. PUCCIARELLI, SR., 32 Kensington Dr. 

86. NANCY REBBERT, 35 Dalton Rd. 

87. NORMAN H. RUSELL, 216 Graniteville Rd. 

88. DARREL R. SANDERS, 878 North Rd. 

89. JOHN A. SCALI, 11 Oak Knoll Ave. 

90. MARK E. SCHWARZ, JR., 15 Castlewood Dr. 

91. IRENE SIGVARDSON, 9 Frank St. 

92. KEVIN W. SIMPSON, 53 Stedman 

93. FRANCES L. SMALDONE, 10 Larssen Circle 

94. MICHAEL P. SOUSA, 8 Pleasant Ave. 

95. ELIZABETH A. ST.CLAIR, 270 Littleton Rd. 

96. BARBARA F. STONE, 5 Sleeper St. 

97. EDWARD M. SULLIVAN, 3 Prairie Rd. 

98. ALAN E. TUCKER, 8 Cathy Rd. 

99. MILDRED WEINSTEIN, 7 Murray Hill Rd. 
100. DAVID R. WILCOX, 205 Graniteville Rd. 



Ind. Engr 

Salesman 

Bank Manager 

Retired 

Civil Eng 

Gas Station 

Business 

Housewife 

Adm Aide 

Technical Sta 

Hair Stylist 

Laborer 

Carpenter 

Elec Insp 

Machinist 

Auto Machinist 

Office Wrk 

At Home 

Housewife 

Traffic Super 

Assembly 

Manager 

Pipe Fitter 

Const Worker 

Retired 

Housewife 

Sales Exec. 

Chemist 

Clerk 

Programmer 

Assembler 

Parker 

Housewife 

Accountant 

Clerk 

Tel Operator 

Engineer 

Cust Eng 

Housewife 

Pub. Acct. 



WARRANT FOR THE 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

April 1, 1978 and April 24, 1978 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, 
viz: 

Precinct 1 : McFarlin School - All Purpose Room 

Precinct 2: North Elementary School Auditorium 

Precinct 3: Colonel Moses Parker Junior High School 

Band Room 



Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 
Precinct 7 
Precinct 8 

Precinct 9: 
Precinct 10 
Precinct 1 1 
Precinct 12 



East Chelmsford School 

Byam School Cafetorium 

Westlands School Cafeteria 

North Elementary School Auditorium 

Small Gymnasium C. Edith McCarthy 

Junior High School 

South Row School Auditorium 

South Row School Auditorium 

Westlands School Cafeteria 

Fire House - Old Westford Road 



On Saturday, the first day of April, 1978, being the 
first Saturday in said month, at 10:00 A.M., for the 
following purposes: 

To bring in their vote for the following officers: 

One Moderator for three years 
One Town Clerk for three years 
One Selectman for three years 



12 



One Treasurer and Tax Collector for three years 

One Assessor for three years 

One Assessor for one year to fill vacancy 

One Tree Warden for three years 

One member of the Board of Health for three years 

Two members of School Committee for three years 

One member of Nashoba Valley Technical High School 

District Commiteee for three years 
One Cemetery Commissioner for three years 
One member of Housing Authority for five years 
One Park Commissioner for three years 
Two Public Library Trustees for three years 
One Planning Board member for three years 
One Sewer Commissioner for three years 

The polls will be open from 10:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.; 
and to meet in the McCarthy Junior High School Gym- 
nasium on Monday, the twenty-fourth day of April, 1978, 
at 7:30 P.M. o'clock in the evening, then and there to act 
upon the following articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To hear reports of Town Officers and 
Committees; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Personnel, Wage, and Salary Administration By-Law as 
follows: 

1. Under Section 3, subtitled PERSONNEL BOARD, 
delete the first paragraph and substitute the follow- 
ing in its place: 

This plan shall be administered by a Personnel 
Board, consisting of three members, two of whom 
shall be known as Public Members and shall be ap- 
pointed by the Town Moderator. Each Public 
Member shall be appointed for two years, one in 
odd numbers years and the other in even number 
years. Each term shall expire at the end of the ap- 
propriate fiscal year. The Town Moderator shall fill 
the unexpired term of either Public Member who 
resigns his appointment. 

The third member, to be known as the Personnel 
Member, shall be elected by the town employees 
who are subject to this by-law. The term of office 
shall be for two years and shall expire on July 1, of 
each odd numbered year. The election of the Per- 
sonnel Member shall be secret and be supervised by 
a board of three election officers appointed by the 
Town Moderator. The election shall be held in June 
to be effective on July 1 . Special elections shall be 
held to fill the unexpired term of the Personnel 
Member who resigns before the term has expired. 

At the first meeting of each fiscal year at which all 
Personnel Board Members are present, a chairman 
of the Personnel Board shall be elected by a majori- 
ty vote. 

2. Under Section 12, subtitled GRIEVANCE PRO- 
CEDURE, delete the entire section and substitute 
the following in its place: 

Any dispute between an employee and his super- 
visor shall first be discussed with his supervisor. If a 
conference between the employee and his im- 



mediate' supervisor fails to clear up any question to 
the satisfaction of the employee, he may refer the 
matter in writing to the appointing authority. If 
two weeks have elapsed since the submission of the 
matter in writing to the appointing authority and 
the dispute is still unresolved, either party may ap- 
peal to the Personnel Board. This Board shall take 
the question under advisement, collecting such 
facts relating thereto as it may deem helpful, and it 
may, in its discretion, hold private or public hear- 
ings with respect to such question. Not later than 
thirty days after receipt of written submission of the 
matter to it, the Personnel Board shall render its 
decision and hereafter take promptly such action as 
may be necessary and authorized hereunder relative 
to the dispute. 

3. Under Section 14, subtitled VACATIONS, delete 
from the first sentence of subparagraph A the 
words "On July 1st of each year". 

4. Under Section 16, subtitled SICK LEAVE, delte 
paragraph (1) and substitute in its place: 

All permanent employees of the Town regardless of 
their length of service will earn twelve (12) days sick 
leave per. At the end of the calendar year, each 
employee may carry over any unused sick leave 
balance so that 120 days may be accrued. 

Under Section 17, subtitled LEAVES OF 
ABSENCE, add paragraph c. as follows: 

All permanent, full-time employees are limited to 
three days leave with pay for personal reasons. Per- 
sonal reasons may include business, legal, religious 
or other matters not covered elsewhere by the leave 
provisions of these by-laws. Personal leave will be 
granted for the remedy of problems which cannot 
be conveniently resolved at times other than during 
the customary work day. Specific personal reasons 
need not be given to supervisors but, except in cases 
of emergency when oral requests may be granted, 
requests for personal leave should be given in 
writing to supervisors at least 48 hours prior to the 
time the leave is to begin. Unused personal days will 
be added to sick days for accrual purposes. 

Under Section 6, subtitled CLASSIFICATION OF 
PRESENT TOWN EMPLOYEES, add paragraphs 
e, f, and g, as follows: 

Jobs shall be classified by the Personnel Board to 
Gravde levels based on the extent of personnel and 
budgeting responsibilities and necessary skills, 
training and experience to perform the job as com- 
pared to other Town positions and the provisions of 
Section 10 of this by-law. 

The Wage and Salary Schedule shall be maintained 
by the following criteria: 

I. The minimum salary for Grade Level 1 shall 
be determined by the Personnel Board. 
II. The minimum salary for each grade level 
above grade level 2 shall be an amount that 
is greater than the minimum salary of grade 
level 1 by a factor that is the difference be- 
tween the number of grade level and the num- 



13 



ber 1 multiplied by 1.5 plus 1. Example: 
Grade level 6 is 1.75 greater than grade level 
1. Calculation: (6-1) x 1.5 - 1.00 = 1.75. 
III. The maximum salary for any grade level will 
be 1.38 times the minimum salary for that 
level. 
IV. There are 20 steps in each grade level. Each 
incremental step is 2% of the minimum salary 
for that grade level. 
V. The Wage and Salary Schedule will be stated 
in annual dollars. Hourly rates for those jobs 
that are paid on an hourly basis will be the 
annual salary divided by 2088 (52.2 weeks 
times 40 hours) for jobs designated "Mechani- 
cal and Construction, Conservation and Ceme- 
teries, Custodian and Health" and will be the 
annual salary divided by 1957.5 (52.2 weeks x 
37.5 hours). 

g. Wage and Salary Schedule 

July 1, 1978 - June 30, 1979 
Grade Level Salary Range 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 



$6,000-$8,280 
6,900-9,522 



7,800 
8,700 
9,600 
10,500 
11,400 
12,300 
13.200 
14,100 
15,000 
15,900 
16,800 
17,700 
18,600 
19,500 



-10,764 
-12,006 
-13,248 
-14,490 
-15,732 
-16,974 
-18,216 
-19,458 
-20,700 
-21,942 
-23,184 
-24,426 
-25,688 
-26.910 



Under Section 8, subtitled INCREASES WITHIN 
THE RATE RANGES, delete the section subtitled 
and substitute in its place: "INCREASES WITHIN 
GRADE LEVELS" and further amending Section 8 
by adding the following: 

A step increase in rate for any employee who is 
above Step 1 must be recommended by the 
employee's department head, appointing authority 
or elected official and be approved by the Personnel 
Board. The decision to grant the increase shall be 
based solely on the performance of the employee 
during the preceeding 12 month period and shall 
not be based on length of service. 

Any employee who is at Step 1 will be advanced to 
Step 2 upon reaching their anniversary date. 

Under Section 24, subtitled JOB TITLES AND 
STANDARD RATES FOR WAGES AND 
SALARIES OF THE PERSONNEL WAGE AND 
SALARY BY-LAW, by deleting therefrom from 
the following positions under Library: Line 1, 
Librarian-MLS; Line 2, Librarian MLS 
(Assistant); Line 4, Senior Assistant Librarian; 
Line 5, Junior Assistant Librarian; Line 6, Clerk; 



Line 7, Aides; under Recreation: Line 2, Director 
of Summer Program; and adding the following 
positions: under Administrative and Clerical: Line 
12, Assistant Town Clerk; Line 13, Administrative 
Assistant-Assessor; under Library; Line 6, Library 
Assistant; and changing the following job titles; 
under Library; Line 1, Library Director; Line 2, 
Library Assistant Director; Line 4, Library Depart- 
ment Head; Line 5, Library Specialist; Line 7, 
Library Clerk; under Recreation: Line 2, Recrea- 
tion Director; 



of act in relation thereto. 



Personnel Board 



ARTICLE 2A. To see if the Town will vote to further 
amend Section 24, subtitled "Job Titles and Standard 
Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage and 
Salary By-Law", to conform to rates of pay neogitated by 
the Town with certain labor organizations, pursuant to 
General Laws, Chapter 150E. 



Current 

7/77 - 6/78 
Administrative and Clerical 

1. Veterans' Agent 11,024 p. a 

2. Clerk Senior 8,807 p. a 

3. Clerk 7,020 p. a 

4. Town Accountant 16,592 p. a 

5. Assistant Treasurer 10,074 p. a 

6. Town Counsel 500 p. a 

7. Selectmen's Adm. Asst. . . . 12.241 p. a 

8. Board of Registrars' Clerk ...850 p. a 
9 Board of Reg. 3 members. .. .360 p.a 

10. Clerk, Part-time 3.56 hr 

11. Town Aide 8, 960 p. a 

12. Asst. Town Clerk - 

13. Adm. Asst. to Assessors- 

Assessors -- 

Conservation, Parks and Cemetery 

Cemetery Superintendent . 15,023 p. a 
Supt. of Insect & Pest Cont. 1,250 p. a 

Landscaper - Park 4.36 hr 

Laborer- Park 3.98hr 

Unskilled Laborer 2.30 hr 

Skilled Forest Workman 3.27 hr 

Equipment Operator 4.73 hr 

Park Superintendent 15.023 p. a 

Custodial 



1. Custodian 3.93hr 

Library 

1. Library Director 16,640 p. a 

2. Library Asst. Director . . . . 11,259 p. a 

3. Branch Librarian 9,487 p. a 

4. Librarian, Dept. Head 3.94 hr 

5. Librarian Specialist 3.56 hr 

6. Librarian Assistants 3.36hr 

7. Librarian Clerk 3.56 hr 

8. Aides 2.30hr 

9. Supervisor - Maintenance . . . .4.72 hr 

Highway Department 

1. Highway Superintendent .21,332 p. a 

2. Highway Foreman 6.87 hr 

3. Administrative Assistant . . 10,074 p. a 

Town Fire Department 

1 . Fire Chief 26,354 p.a. 

2. Deputy Fire Chief 22, 195 p.a. 

3. Mechanic (Fire and Police) ... 6.00 hr. 



Proposed 
Level 



Recomnd. 
Salary 

12,792 p.a 
9,396. p.a 

*#1 

18,126 p.a 

10,752 p.a 

500 p.a 

14,256 p.a 

850 p.a 

360 p.a 

3.81 hr 

10,368 p.a 

10,752 p.a 

10,7852 p.a. 



15,744 p.a. 
1,250 p.a. 



16,104 p.a. 



12 


17,808 p.a 


7 


11,856 p.a 


5 


10,944 p.a 


3 


4.14 hr 


2 


3.74 hr 


1 


3.56 hr 


1 


3.74 hr 


-*#2 


2.56 hr.*#4 


4 


10,614 p.a 


12 


21,332 p.a 


9 




5 


*#1 



*#5 

*#6 

6.34 hr. 



14 



Town Police Department 

1. Police Chief 27,408 p.a. 

2. Deputy Chief 22, 195 p.a. 

Recreation 

1. Clerk, part-time 3.56hr. 

2. Recreation Director 1.290 p.a. 



Min. 
72.80wk 
72.80wk 
72.80wk 
72.80wk 
72.80wk 
72.80wk 



-#2 

Max. 

104.00wk 

104.00wk 

104.00wk 

104.00wk 

104.00wk 

104.00wk 



3.81 hr. 
140.00 wk. 

Min. Max. 

-#276.40wkl09.20wk 
■#276.40wkl09.20wk 
■#276.40wkl09.20wk 
-#276.40wkl09.20wk 
•#276.40wkl09.20wk 
■#276.40wkl09.00wk 



3. Swimming Dir. 

4. Swimming Inst. 

5. Playground Dir. 

6. Playground Supvsr. 

7. Playground Inst. 

8. Sports Inst. 

Youth Center 

1. Youth Center Coordinator 11,499 p.a. 7 12,084 p.a. 

2. Youth Center Supervisor 4.15 hr. 2 *#3 

3. Supervisor IV 4.02 hr. 2 *#3 

4. Supervisor III 3.72 hr. 2 *#3 

5. Supervisor II 3.46 hr. 2 *#3 

6. Supervisor I 3.20 hr. 2 * *23 

7. Clerk - Youth 3.56 hr. 2 3.81 hr. 

Miscellaneous 

1 . Animal Inspector l,000p.a. -*#2 l.OOOp.a 

2. Building Inspector 17,777 p.a. 10 17,777 p.a 

3. Gas Inspector 3.750p.a. -*#2 3,750 p.a 

4. Electric Inspector 14,560p.a. 9 15,312 p.a 

5. Sealer of Wghts. & Meas. . .2,000 p.a. -*#2 2.000 p.a 

6. Dog Officer 7,704 p.a. 2 8,142 p.a 

7. Asst. Dog Officer 6,163p.a. 1 6,480 p.a 

8. Clock Winder 100 p.a. *#2 100 p.a 

Footnotes 

*#1 — Representated by Collective Bargaining Union 

*#2-Not in "Job Rating Plan" 

*#3 — No percentage increase - range only 

*#4 — Federal Minimum Hour Wage 

*#5 — Salary will be 200% of the highest paid union firefighter 

established by State Law 

*#6-Salary will be 84% of the Fire Chief 

*#7- Salary will be 81% of the Police Chief 

or act in relation thereto. 

Personnel Board 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate such sums of money as may be required to 
defray town charges for the fiscal period from July 1 , 
1978 to June 30, 1979; or act in relation thereto. 

Treasurer 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1978; in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 
44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes as may be given 
for a period of less than one year in accordance with 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Treasurer 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to request 
the Department of Corporations and Taxation, Division 
of Accounts of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to 
make an audit of all accounts in all departments in the 
Town of Chelmsford; or act in relation thereto. 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to engage an outside Auditing Firm to 
make an audit of all accounts in all Departments in the 
Town of Chelmsford; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a certain sum of money with which to meet 
bills for previous years; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$428,130.37 or some other sum of money to pay the 
Treasurer of Middlesex County Retirement System, the 
said amount being the Town's share of the pension, ex- 
pense and military service funds; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to be used as a Reserve Fund at the discre- 
tion of the Finance Committee, as provided in General 
Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6; or act in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will authorize the 
transfer of reimbursement funds in the sume of 
$88,888.00 received from the Commonwealth of Mass- 
achusetts Flood Relief Board and the transfer of 
$11,112.00 from Free Cash to pay a bond issue note or 
notes totaling $100,000.00 borrowed for the purpose of 
reconstruction of Crystal Lake; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a certain sum of money for the purpose of 
purchasing six (6) new four-door sedans to be used by the 
Police Department, said purchase to be made under the 
supervision of the Board of Selectmen; and to authorize 
the Selectmen to transfer by a good and sufficient bill of 
sale, title to one (1) 1975; one (1) 1976; and four (4) 1977 
cruisers now being used by the Police Department; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$1,550.00 to match LEAA Federal Funds, for the pur- 
pose to provide mutual aid programs for the Police 
Department; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purchase of a new four-door sedan 
type vehicle for the Fire Department, said purchase to be 
made under the supervision of the Board of Selectmen; or 
act in relation thereto. 



15 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purhcase of Equipment for the 
Highway Department, such purchase to be made under 
the supervision of the Board of Selectmen, and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to dispose of equipment 
presently being used by the Highway Department as 
follows: 

(a) To purchase one (1) Dump Truck for the Highway 
Department and sell by good and sufficient bill of sale 
one (1) dump truck presently beings used by the Highway 
Department. 

(b) To purchase one (1) sweeper broom for the Highway 
Department and sell by good and sufficient bill of sale 
one (1) sweeper broom being used by the Highway 
Department. 

(c) To purchase one (1) Air Compressor and sell by good 
and sufficient bill of sale one (1) air compressor presently 
being used by the Highway Department. 

(d) To purchase one (1) Cab and Chassis and sell by good 
and sufficient bill of sale one (1) cab and chassis presently 
being used by the Highway Department. 

(e) To purchase one (1) Sander body for the Highway 
Department and to sell by good and sufficient bill of sale 
one (1) sander body presently being used by the Highway 
Department. 

(f) To purchase one (1) half-ton Pick-up Truck for the 
Highway Department and to sell by good and sufficient 
bill of sale one (1) half- ton pick-up truck presently being 
used by the Highway Department. 

(g) To purchase one (1) two cubic yard loader for the 
Highway Department and to sell by good and sufficient 
bill of sale one (1) two cubic yard loader presently being 
used by the Highway Department. 

(h) To purchase two (2) new Snow Plows. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to alleviate certain drainage problems, 
throughout the Town, as determined by the Board of 
Selectmen; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to purhcase one % ton pick-up truck for 
the Park Department; or act in relation thereto. 

Park Commission 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will transfer 
$5,000.00 from the sale of Graves and Lots to Cemetery 
Improvement Development Fund; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Cemetery Commission 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will raise and ap- 
propriate or transfer from available funds a certain sum 



of money for the purchase of one (1) two ton dump truck 
for the Cemetery Department; or act in relation thereto. 

Cemetery Commission 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to accept a 
trust under the will of Christopher Roby for the purpose 
of improving and beautifying the West Chelmsford 
Cemetery and the streets and sidewalks of said village, 
and for the support of preaching and relieving the 
necessities of the poor in said village; and to designate the 
Cemetery Commissioners as agents of the Town to ad- 
minister said trust; or act in relation thereto. 

By Petition 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the implementation of a part of the 
Recreation Master Plan; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the construction of tennis courts at the 
Byam School; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of mony for the final design plan of Central Square 
traffic improvements; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the construction of sidewalks; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 24. To se if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$1,800.00 to be used to join or buy into the Merrimack 
Valley Home Care Center, Inc. for the purpose of obtain- 
ing services for the care of the Town's older Americans; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$2,800.00 to purchase a certain parcel of land from the 
Trustees of the Penn Central Transportation Co. situated 
in the Town of Chelmsford, County of Middlesex, Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts bounded Southeasterly by 
land of Penn Central Transportation Co. and Nor- 
thwesterly by land of the Town of Chelmsford, being part 
of a right-of-way known as the Lowell Secondary Branch 
I.D. No. Ma B100-CO2 and shown on VAL Map No. 
500-9104-041D-23-1 containing 8,000 square feet more 
or less; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



16 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by fee simple in accor- 
dance with Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 132 A 
and Chapter 40, a certain parcel of land located off Ac- 
ton Road owned by Sarah B. Ferguson being a portion of 
the premises inherited from John J. Fay Middlesex Pro- 
bate Court Document #323526. This land contains ap- 
proximately 8.85 acres and is to held, managed, and con- 
trolled by the Conservation Commission for the promo- 
tion and development of the natural resources and for the 
protection of the watershed resources of said Town, and 
further for the purpose of acquiring said land, that the 
Conservation Commission be authorized to enter into a 
contractual self-help agreement with the Office of En- 
vironmental Affairs, and that the Town raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $7,000.00 and authorize the Select- 
men to expend the sum of $7,000.00 from the Conserva- 
tion fund; or act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to approve 
the filing of a petition in the General Court under the 
provisions of Section 8 of Article 89 of the Amendments 
to the Constitution for a special act: 

Enabling the Town of Chelmsford to hold its Annual 
Town Meeting at two separate and distinct times. Each 
meeting to be called in pursuance of a separate warrant 
under the hands of the Selectmen, notice of which shall 
be given at least seven (7) days before such meeting as 
prescribed in Massachusetts General Laws, Chpater 39, 
Section 9. One meeting may be held in February, March, 
April or May and one meeting may be held in September, 
October or November. The selectmen shall insert in the 
warrants for the annual meetings all subjects, the inser- 
tion of which shall be requested of them in writing by ten 
or more registered voters of the Town and as prescribed 
by Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 39, Section 10. 

An Article for the election of town officers and an Article 
covering the town's annual budget shall be contained in 
the warrant for the annual town meeting to be held in 
February, March, April or May; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the General By-Laws Article VI Police Regulations Sec- 
tion 18 Regulation of Motor Boats on Crystal Lake as 
follows: 

1 . By amending the title of Section 1 8 to read Regulation 
of Motor Boats and Recreational Vehicles on Crystal 
Lake. 

2. By adding the words "including snowmobiles" im- 
mediately after the words "vehicle powered by an 
engine"; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Park Department Rules and Regulations by deleting 
the paragraph which reads: 

"All violators... 

$20.00 for each offense" 



and inserting the following: 

"All violators... 

$200.00 for each offense." 
or act in relations thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Personnel, Wage and Salary Administration By-Law by 
adding the following "Section 27 - Relatives Working in 
Same Department - 'No employee will be eligible to be 
employed in a department where there is a member of his 
or her immediate family employed'; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 31 . To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Chapter 808 of the Acts of 1975 as amended 
and to amend the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law as follows 
to bring it into conformity with said Act; or act in rela- 
tion thereto: 

1. Add to Section 1120 Authority the words "and under 
the authority of Article 89 of the Amendments to the 
Constitution, the 'Home Rule Amendment', and", so that 
Section 1120 will read as follows: 

"1120 Authority. This By-Law is adopted pursuant to 
and under the authority of Article 89 of the Amendments 
to the Constitution, the 'Home Rule Amendment', and 
the provisions of Chapter 40A of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and amendments 
thereto, hereinafter referred to as the 'Zoning Act'." 

2. Add to Section 1220. Compliance Certification the 
word "moved," so that Section 1220 will read as follows: 

"1220. Compliance Certification. Buildings, structures, 
or signs may not be erected, substantially altered, moved, 
or changed in use and land may not be changed in prin- 
cipal use without certification by the Inspector of 
Buildings that such action is in compliance with then ap- 
plicable zoning, or without review by him regarding 
whether all necessary permits have been received from 
those governmental agencies from which approval is re- 
quired by federal, state, or local laws. Issuance of a 
Building Permit or Certificate of Use and Occupancy, 
where required under the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts State Building Code, may serve as such 
certification. 

3. Add to Section 1240. Penalty. The words "any of the 
conditions under which a permit is issued, or any decision 
rendered by the Board of Appeals", so that Section 1240 
will read: 

"1240. Penalty. Any person violating any of the provi- 
sions of this By-Law, any of the conditions under which a 
permit is issued, or any decision rendered by the Board of 
Appeals shall be fined not more than $100 for each of- 
fense. Each day that such violation continues shall con- 
stitute a separate offense." 

4. In Subsection 1323 (c) delete the word "administra- 
tion", substituting the word "administrative" in place 
thereof. 

5. In Section 1340. Repetitive Petitions, delete the word 
"exceptions", substituting the words "Special Permits" in 



17 



place thereof. 

6. Delete Section 2420. Extension or Alteration in its 

entirety, substituting the following in place thereof: 

"2420. Extension or Alternation. As provided in Section 
6 of Chapter 40 A, G.L., a nonconforming single - or two- 
family dwelling may be altered or extended provided that 
doing so does not increase the nonconforming nature of 
said structure, and other pre-existing nonconforming 
structures or uses may be extended, altered, or changed 
in use on Special Permit from the Board of Appeals if the 
Board of Appeals finds that such extension, alteration, or 
change will not be substantially more detrimental to the 
neighborhood than the existing nonconforming use." 

7. Delete Section 2530. Isolated Lots in its entirety, 
substituting the following in place thereof: 

"2530. Isolated Lots. Any increase in lots area, width, 
depth, frontage, yard, or coverage requirements of this 
By-Law shall not apply to erection, extension, alteration, 
or moving of a structure on a legally created lot not 
meeting current requirements provided that the appli- 
cant documents that. 

(a) At the time such increased requirement became 
applicable to it, the lot: 

( 1 ) had at least 5,000 square feet of lot area and 
50 feet of frontage on a street; and 

( 2 ) was held in ownership separate from all other 
lots having frontage within 1 ,000 feet on that 
same street; and 

( 3 ) conformed to then-existing dimensional re- 
quirements; and 

(b) the lot is to be used for single-family or non- 
residential use. 

Such nonconforming lots may be changed in size of shape 
or their land area recombined without losing this exemp- 
tion, so long as the change does not increase the actual or 
potential number of buildable lots. 

8. Amend ARTICLE V. DEFINITIONS by inserting the 
following definition at its appropriate alphabetical loca- 
tion: 

"Lot area The horizontal area of the lot exclusive 
of any area in a street or recorded way 
open to public use. At least 80% of the 
lot area required for zoning complaince 
shall be land other than that under any 
water body or bog, swamp, wet 
meadow, or marsh, as defined in Sec. 
40, Ch. 131, G.L. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law as follows: 
1 . Amend Section 2300. Use Regulations Schedule by 
adding footnote 4, to read as follows: 

"4. Except 'BA' if resulting in more than 10,000 sq. 
ft. gross floor area devoted to business uses on the 
premises." 

and by referencing footnote 4 to each "P" entry 
under Business Uses which is not already referenc- 



ed "1". 

Amend Article IV. Special Regulations by adding 

Section 4500 Major Business Complexes, to read as 

follows: 

"4500 Major Business Complexes 

"4510 Applicability 

Any premises having more than 10,000 square feet 
gross floor area devoted to business use shall be con- 
sidered a Major Business Complex. Construction or 
change of use resulting in such a complex is 
allowable only if granted a Special Permit by the 
Board of Appeals in accordance with the following: 

"4520 Objectives 

The objectives for allowing Major Business Com- 
plexes are to increase the diversity and convenience 
of goods and services available in Chelmsford, to 
provide entrepreneurial and employment oppor- 
tunities for area residents, to focus development at 
locations able to support it with relatively small en- 
vironmental or municipal cost, and to protect the 
town's natural environment, existing character and 
development, and ability to provide public services. 

"4530 Submittals 

Two copies of the following shall accompanying an 
application for a Special Permit for a Major 
Business Complex or for rezoning to accomodate 
such a complex. One copy shall be transmitted to 
the Planning Board. For Special Permits, the Plan- 
ning Board shall make recommendations to the 
Board of Appeals regarding compliance with Sec- 
tion 4540 Decision Criteria. (The Planning Board 
shall neither sponsor nor favorably recommend any 
rezoning of three or more acres to a commercial 
district unless such materials have been submitted 
to it as a public hearing). 

4531. A site plan, as specified at Section 1424. 

4532. Analysis of the consequences of the proposed 
development, evaluating the following impacts at a 
level of detail appropriate to the scale of develop- 
ment proposed, and using analysis materials pro- 
vided by the Planning Board; 

Natural environment: groundwater and surface 
water quality, groundwater level, stream flows, ero- 
sion and siltation, vegetation removal (especially 
unusual species and mature trees), and wildlife 
habitats. 

Public Services: traffic safety and congestion, need 
for water system improvements, need for public 
sewerage. 

Economics: anticipated market area, complemen- 
tarity with or duplication of existing services, 
amount and types of employment, labor force 
area. 

Visual environment: visibility of buildings and 
parking, visual consistency with existing develop- 
ment in the area. 



18 



"4540 Decision Criteria 

A special permit for a Major Business Complex 
shall be approved only upon determination by the 
Board of Appeals that the requirement of Section 
1520 Special Permit Criteria, Section 1425 Plann- 
ing Board (Site Plan) Approval, and the following 
have been met. 

4541. The proposed plan is consistent with any sub- 
mittals made under Section 4530 prior to rezoning, 
or in the event of inconsistency, satisfactory ex- 
planation has been made submitted showing why 
the departure is necessitated by change conditions 
or earlier error, and that the departure does not 
reduce compliance with the objectives for Major 
Business Complexes specified in Section 4510. 

4542. The Complex shall be so designed and 
located that annual average daily traffic is not in- 
creased 50% or more above current levels at any 
point more than 1,000 feet from an expressway in- 
terchange, with current levels being as determined 
by the Chelmsford Planning Board; and shall be so 
located that resultant traffic is not above the 
capacity of roads and intersections at level of service 
"C" at any point with 1 mile of the premises, using 
definitions and methods of estimation as outlined 
by the Highway Research Board Highway Capaci- 
ty Manual, 1965 or later editions. 

4543. Site design and storm water facilities shall be 
so designed that in a 5 year storm the peak storm- 
water flows leaving the premises will not be increas- 
ed more than 10% above current flows or cause 
design capacity of receiving structures or channel 
capacity of receiving streams to be exceeded."; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to (1) 
amend the Chlemsford Zoning By-Laws by deleting Sec- 
tion 3300. Signs and Outdoor Lighting and the defini- 
tions of "Sign" and "Sign, Area of in Article V Defini- 
tions, replacing them with new definitions and a new Sec- 
tion 3300; and (2) to adopt a new Town By-Law titled 
"Sign By-Law", both as provided in the Planning Board 
report dated March 27, 1978, on file with the Town Clerk 
and circulated at the Town Meeting; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Chelmsford Zoning By-Laws and Zoning Map to 
change from Single Residence District (RA) to General 
Commercial District (CD) the land situated on the easter- 
ly side of North Road in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, 
Massachusetts, and being shown on a plan of land entitl- 
ed: "Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Mass. Owned by 
Theodore W. Emerson, Surveyed 22 November 1972. 
Richard G. McGlinchey" which plan is recorded with 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 
115, Plan 157 (Sheet 1 of 2) and bounded and described 
as follows: 



WESTERLY: 



by North Road, as shown on 



said plan, 230.46 feet; 

NORTHERLY: by land now or formerly of 

L. Rodger Currie and by 
land now or formerly of 
Theodore W. Emerson, a 
total of 400.00 feet; 

EASTERLY: by land now or formerly of 

Theodore W. Emerson, as 
shown on said plan, 401.04 
feet; 

NORTHEASTERLY: by land now or formerly of 
Penn Central Railroad; 

SOUTHERLY: by land of the Town of 

Chelmsford, as shown on 
said plan, 261.48 feet; 

WESTERLY: by land now or formerly of 

H.L. Davis, E.G. Krasnecki, 
and the Town of 
Chelmsford, as shown on 
said plan, 166.21 feet; and 

SOUTHERLY: by land of the Town of 

Chelmsford, as shown on 
said plan, 130.45 feet. 

Containing according to said plan, 139,888 square feet 
(3.211 Acres) more or less. 

Said land having been granted to The Town of 
Chelmsford by Bradford O. Emerson and Dorothy B. 
Emerson by deed dated January 2, 1976 and recorded in 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 2179 
at Page 531; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Chelmsford Zoning By-Laws and Zoning Map to 
change from Single Residence District (RA) to General 
Commercial District (CD) the land in Chelmsford, Coun- 
ty of Middlesex, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
situated on the Southerly side of Fletcher Street, bounded 
and described as follows: 

NORTHERLY: by the Southerly side of said 

Fletcher Street 110 feet, 
more or less; 

by land of Carragher et als 
166.11 feet, more or less; 

by land of the Town of 
Chelmsford 110 feet, more 
or less; and 

by land of Currie 166.11 
feet, more or less. 

Being a portion of the premises described in a deed of 
Bradford O. Emerson et als dated March 31, 1977, and 
recorded with the Middlesex North District Registry of 
Deeds at Book 2237, Page 368. 

Being a portion of Parcel B on a plan of land entitled 
"Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Mass. for Evergreen Con- 
dominium, Feb. 15, 1977, Robert M. Gill & Associates, 
Inc., Lowell, Mass. "which plan is recorded with said 



EASTERLY: 



SOUTHERLY: 



WESTERLY: 



19 



Registry of Deeds at Plan Book 124, Plan 29, or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectman 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to 
authorize the Selectmen under the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 3 to 
grant by deed of the Board of Selectmen to L. Rodger 
Currie and Patricia C. Currie the following described 
property, for good and sufficient consideration. 

The land with the buildings thereon, situated on the 
Easterly side of North Road in Chelmsford, Middlesex 
County, Massachusetts and being shown on a plan of land 
entitled: "Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Mass. Owned by 
Theodore W. Emerson, Surveyed 22 November, 1972, 
Richard L. McGlinchey" which plan is recorded with 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 
115, Plan 157 (Sheet 1 of 2) and bounded and described 
as follows: 



WESTERLY: 
NORTHERLY: 



EASTERLY: 



by North Road, as shown on 
said plan, 230.46 feet; 

by land now or formerly of 
L. Rodger Currie and by 
land now or formerly of 
Theodore W. Emerson, a 
total of 400.00 feet; 

by land now or formerly of 
Theodore W. Emerson as 
shown on said plan, 401.04 
feet; 

NORTHEASTERLY: by land now or formerly of 
Penn Central Railroad; 

SOUTHERLY: by land of the Town of 

Chelmsford, as shown on 
said plan, 261.48 feet; 

by land now or formerly of 
H.L. Davis. E.G. Rrasnecki, 
and The Town of 
Chelmsford, as shown on 
said plan, 166.21 feet; and 

by land of The Town of 
Chelmsford, as shown on 
said plan, 130.45 feet. 

Containing, according to said plan, 139,999 square feet 
(3.211 Acres) more of less. 

Said land with the buildings thereon was granted to the 
Town of Chelmsford by deed of Bradford O. Emerson 
and Dorothy B. Emerson dated January 2, 1976 and 
recorded in Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, 
Book 2179, at Page 531.; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to renovate the McFarlin School "A 
Building" on Billerica Road, for municipal purposes; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



WESTERLY: 



SOUTHERLY: 



ARTICLE 41 . To see if the Town will vote to establish 
an interim Public Works Advisory Council; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to direct the 
Board of Selectmen to request approval from the State 
Reclamation Board and following such approval, if 
granted, to take such action as may be necessary for the 
Town to join the Central Massachusetts Mosquito Control 
Program; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to join the 
Lowell Regional Transportation Authority in conformity 
with and pursuant to all of the applicable provisions of 
Chapter 1141 of the Acts of 1973; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town under and pursuant 
to authority granted in General Laws Chapter 40D, Sec- 
tion 21(g) as amended, will authorize the Board of Select- 
men to enter into a contract with the operator of solid 
waste disposal facilities to be established in the Town of 
North Andover for the disposal of refuse, garbage and 
waste and for the use of byproducts resulting from the 
operation of such facilities, which contract will 

(1) be for a term of twenty years, more or less; 

(2) include provisions for the delivery of minimum 
amounts of refuse, garbage and waste and 
payments for the use of the facilities to be based 
thereon; 

(3) provide for unit prices that will be graduated 
and for adjustments thereof and for the use of 
steam, electricity and other byproducts resulting 
from the use of the facilities and for credits or 
payments of the Town resulting therefrom; 

(4) the use by the Town or other municipalities of 
the uncommitted capacity of such facilities; 

(5) contain other provisions incidental and related 
to the foregoing general matters; and 

(6) be generally in the form of proposed contract 
negotiated by representatives of the member 
communities of the Northeast Solid Waste Com- 
mittee (NESWC) with such changes therein as 
may be approved by said Board of Selectmen; or 
act in relation thereo. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will adopt the provi- 
sions of Chapter 770 of the Acts of 1975 as amended by 
Chapter 420 of the Acts of 1977 (providing for the 
establishment of the Southern Essex Solid Waste Disposal 
District), and to certify simultaneous with said adoption, 
the minimum amount of solid waste for which the Town 
shall pay to have processed, whether or not it shall deliver 
less than that amount; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



20 



ARTICLE 46. To see if the town will vote to accept the 
following mentioned streets as laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen and shown by their reports and plans duly filed 
in the Office of the Town Clerk, and to raise and ap- 
propriate or transfer from available funds a certain sum 
of money for the purpose of reconstructing the following 
mentioned streets: 

Higate Road Extension 

Newtowne Way 

Industrial Avenue Extension 

Providing all construction of same meets with the re- 
quirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to the 
withholding of any remaining bonds until such re- 
quirements have been met; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a sum of 
money to engage an outside professional consultant for 
the evaluation of all Town Insurance Policies; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the town will vote to abolish 
the Varney Playground Commission which powers are to 
be transferred to the Recreation Commission; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to convey to Peter and Dorothy 
Emanouil all right, title and interest, if any, held by 
Town in the abandoned portion of Hunt Road as describ- 
ed in plan entitled "Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Mass. 
owned by Estate of Laura Dutton"; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to convey to Raymond A. 
Robitaille and Doris I. Robitaille, husband and wife, 
both of Chelmsford for a consideration to be determined, 
all right, title and interest, if any, held by the Town in 
the following parcel of land: 

Lots 62, 63, and 58, Block 21 Assessor's Map 64, con- 
sisting of 5080 square feet of land, more or less, and the 
buildings thereon, if any, located on Willis Drive, which 
was taken for non-payment of taxes from Workingmen's 
Home Realty Trust by instruments dated September 3, 
1963 and recorded at Middlesex North District Registry 
of Deeds in Book 1620, Pages 134 and 135. 

For title reference, see Treasurer's Deed to the Town of 
Chelmsford dated June 10, 1975 and recorded at said 
Registry of Deeds in Book 2153, Page 303; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to sell from time to time Town owned 
property; said conveyances to include all right, title and 



interest, if any, held by the Town in the parcels of land; 
for consideration to be determined; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to instruct 
the Board of Assessors to issue a certain sum of money 
from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the 
tax rate for the current fiscal period; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Finance Committee 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this 20th day of March, A.D.. 
1978. 

Philip L. Currier, Chairman 

William R. Murphy 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr. 

Arnold J. Lovering 

Paul C. Hart 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



March 24, 1978 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: McFarlin School-All Purpose Room; North 
Elementary School Auditorium; Colonel Moses Parker 
Junior High School Band Room; East Chelmsford School; 
Byam School Cafetorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; 
North Elementary School Auditorium; Small Gym- 
nasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High School; South 
Row School Auditorium; South Row School Auditorium; 
Westlands School Cafeteria; Fire House-Old Westford 
Road, seven days at least before the time appointed for 
holding the meeting aforesaid. 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 

A True Copy Attest: 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL 

TOWN MEETING 

May 11, 1978 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 



21 



said Chelmsford to meet in the McCarthy Junior High 
School Gymnasium on Monday Evening, the eleventh day 
of May, 1978 at 8:00 PM o'clock, then and there to act 
upon the following articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1 . To see if the Town will authorize the 
Selectmen to expend, upon receipt the sum of $34,214.00 
from funds received from the Commonwealth of Mass- 
achusetts Flood Relief Board to pay a bond issue note or 
notes in the amount of $34,214.00 borrowed for the pur- 
pose of the restoration of Crystal Lake; or act in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of one sidewalk snowplow 
tractor; such purchase to be made under the supervision 
of the Board of Selectmen; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to be transferred to the Insurance Depart- 
ment, Chapter 32B-Insurance-Employees; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



April 25, 1978 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: McFarlin School-All Purpose Room; North 
Elementary School Auditorium; Colonel Moses Parker 
Junior High School Band Room; East Chelmsford School; 
Byam School Cafetorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; 
North Elementary School Auditorium; Small Gym- 
nasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High School; South 
Row School Auditorium; South Row Auditorium; West- 
lands School Cafeteria; Fire House-Old Westford Road, 
fourteen days at least before the time appointed for 
holding the meeting aforesaid. 



William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



A true copy, Attest: 
William E. Spence 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to accept 
Section 7 IE of Chapter 639, an Act which would permit 
the School Committee to expend receipts received from 
certain programs; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to accept 
Chapter 41, Section 100B regarding disability retirement 
and medical expenses for the Police Officers; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to obtain the necessary plans, profiles and 
legal descriptions for the acceptance of LaFayette Ter- 
race; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to be transferred to the following accounts: 

a. Cemetery Departments: General Labor 

b. Fire Department: Regular and Substitute Account 

c. Highway Department: Labor-Men 

or act in relation thereto. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this 25th day of April, A.D., 
1978. 



William R. Murphy, Chairman 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr. 

John W. Carson 

Arnold J. Lovering 

Paul C. Hart 

Chelmsford Board of Selectmen 



22 

ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
April 1, 1978 



MODERATOR for 3 years 

Daniel J. Coughlin Jr. (reelection) 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

TOWN CLERK for 3 years 

Mary E. St.Hilaire (re-election) 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

SELECTMAN for 3 years 

John W. Carson 

Philip L. Currier (re-election) 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

TREASURER & TAX COLLECTOR for 3 yeai 

Philip J. McCormack (re-election) 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

ASSESSOR for 3 years 

Janet Lombard (re-election) 
Stratos G. Dukakis 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

ASSESSOR 1 year to fill vacancy 

Julian H. Zabierek 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

TREE WARDEN for 3 years 

Donald P. Gray 
Richard V. Healy 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

MEMBER OF BOARD OF HEALTH for 3 yea 

Peter Dulchinos (re-election) 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE MEMBER for 3 years 

Carol C. Cleven (re-election) 

John W. Peters 

Martin Ames 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School 
District Committee Member for 3 years 

Donald P. Ayer 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONER for 3 years 

Arthur J. Colmer (re-election) 

All others 

Blanks 



Prec 1 Prec 2 Prec 3 Prec 4 Prec 5 Prec 6 Prec 7 Prec ! 

465 268 490 192 501 




131 



273 
320 









129 




105 



274 




Prec 9 Prec 10 Prec 1 1 Prec 12 Total 

308 507 395 465 4673 
11116 
71 170 87 134 1235 

380 678 483 600 5914 



253 


191 


333 


222 


384 


2998 


206 


186 


339 


254 


208 


2866 











1 





2 


461 


380 


678 


483 


600 


5914 


376 


320 


535 


405 


497 


4950 



329 
246 



480 1260 1112 



3774 
1433 



384 


464 


4603 








2 


99 


136 


1309 


483 


600 


5914 


276 


354 


3301 


248 


342 


3412 


202 


278 


2773 



966 1200 11828 



463 4653 

1 

137 1260 

600 5914 



23 



HOUSING AUTHORITY MEMBER for 5 years 

Robert L. Hughes (reelection) 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

PARK COMMISSIONER for 3 years 

Arthur L. Bennett (re-election) 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUSTEE for 3 years 

Howard K. Moore (re-election) 
Elizabeth A. McCarthy (re-election) 



TOTAL 

PLANNING BOARD MEMBER for 3 years 

Thomas E. Firth Jr. (re-election) 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

SEWER COMMISSIONER for 3 years 

Dennis J. Ready 
All Others 



1200 11828 



24 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
April 24, 1978 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:50 
P.M. by the Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin Jr., who 
recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 436 
voters present. The Moderator moved that the reading of 
the Constable's return of service and the posting of the 
warrant be waived. It was so voted. The Moderator then 
moved that the reading of the entire warrant be waived. 
It was so voted. 

Selectman Murphy moved to recess the Annual Town 
Meeting and to conduct an informal Budget hearing on 
the Federal Revenue Sharing Funds. 

It was so voted. 

Richard Sullivan of the Finance Committee explains 
where the Federal Revenue Sharing Funds for fiscal 
1978-1979 will be applied as follows: 



Under Article 3 in the following budgets: 

Fire Department Salaries 
Police Department Salaries 
Unclassified Department: 
Contingency Fund for Engineering 
Services 

Under Article 6: 

To engage an outside Accounting Firm 
to conduct an audit of the Town's 
Financial records 

Total 



$290,000.00 
290,000.00 



20,000.00 



20,000.00 



$620,000.00 

Mr. Erie Poulin asked a question concerning the 
figures, which was answered by Mr. Sullivan. The 
Moderator asked if there were any further questions? 
Hearing none, Selectman Murphy moved to close the in- 
formal hearing on the Federal Revenue Sharing Funds. 

It was so voted. 

The Annual Town Meeting reconvened at 8:15 P.M. 
The Moderator gave a brief description on the Town 
Meeting process. A moment of silence followed, in 
memory of Claude J. Harvey who died this past year. He 
was a Member of the Planning Board from 1955-1962. 

Under Article 1. The reports of Town officers and 
committees were heard. Selectman Murphy moved to ac- 
cept the following resolve: 

Resolved. To earmark a percentage of the State's 
Growth Revenues, not subject to appropriation by 
the General Court, to be used to create a new Local 
Aid Fund, distributions from said fund to be sub- 
ject to appropriation in cities, by the city council 
and in Towns, by the Town Meeting, and to be us- 
ed to support equally general government and 
education budgets. 

It was so voted. 



Selectman Murphy gave a brief report on the Capitol 
Improvement Committee, showing a five year plan and 
explanation. 

Joseph B. Shanahan nominated Bernard Battles for the 
unexpired two year term of the Varney Playground Com- 
mission. A motion was made to close nominations, mo- 
tion carried. A voice vote was taken on the above name, 
and it was so voted. 

Joseph B. Shanahan then nominated Harry Ayotte for 
a three year term on the Varney Playground Commission. 
A motion was made to close the nominations, motion car- 
ried. A voice vote was taken on the above name, and it 
was so voted. 

Under Article 2. Chairman of the Personnel Board 
David McLachlan, moved to amend the Personnel Wage 
and Salary Administration By-Law. 

A discussion took place over the proposed change. The 
Board of Selectmen made a motion to delete the section 
subtitled SICK LEAVE and the section subtitled 
LEAVES OF ABSENCE. The reasoning for this was that 
the Selectmen were presently contemplating negotia- 
tions, not only with a Town Hall Employee Union, and it 
was felt by the Board that these changes would jeopardize 
their position in negotiations, not only with this union but 
possibly other departments also. The Board wanted it to 
remain as presently written, with just 15 sick days. The 
Finance Committee supported the Selectmen's motion. 
Chairman McLachlan, and Personnel Board Member 
Fabian both stated why the Board wanted the change in 
the by-law. Dr. Fabian felt that regardless of negotiations 
those personnel who are not union cannot achieve any 
type of change unless it is done through Town Meeting 
action. Mr. Erie Poulin questioned the Personnel Board 
on why these days are not referred to as Funeral Leave. 
The Board explained that this is in addition to the 
Funeral Leave which is presently in the By-Law. 

A voice vote was taken on the motion to amend. The 
motion was defeated, Selectman Murphy questioned the 
count, the following tellers were appointed: 



Richard Burtt 
Alfred Coburn 
John Richardson 
Margaret Johnson 

the results were 105 
defeated. 



Yes 248 No. 



Ina Greenblatt 

Richard Lahue 

Dorothy Lerer 

Judy Haas 

The motion was 



Mr. Allan T. Galpin moved to amend Section 3 subtitl- 
ed PERSONNEL BOARD by inserting the following 
sentence: 

"Each Public Member must be a resident of the 
Town throughout his term of appointment. In ad- 
dition, a Public Member may not be a former 
employee of the Town nor may he become one dur- 
ing the term of appointment." 

Chairman of the Personnel Board, David McLachlan 
and Personnel Board Member Michael Fabian, both ex- 
press their views on why they were against the motion. 



25 



The Moderator made a point of order by reading a part 
of the Personnel Board's present By-Law "No member of 
the Personnel Board may be an employee of the Town 
nor hold Town Office, appointed or Elected." More 
discussion followed. 

A voice vote was taken on the motion to amend, Mo- 
tion defeated. 

The Board of Selectmen along with the Finance Com- 
mittee supported the article. A voice vote was taken on 
article 2 as presented by the Personnel Board. It was so 
voted: 

Article 2 as presented by the Personnel Board: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel, 
Wage, and Salary administration by-law as follows: 

1. Under Section 3, subtitled PERSONNEL BOARD, 
delete the first paragraph and substitute the follow- 
ing in its place: 

This plan shall be administered by a Personnel 
Board, consisting of three members, two of whom 
shall be known as Public Members and shall be ap- 
pointed by the Town Moderator. Each Public 
Member shall be appointed for two years, one in 
odd number years and the other in even number 
years. Each term shall expire at the end of the ap- 
propriate fiscal year. The Town Moderator shall fill 
the unexpired term of either Public Member who 
resigns his appointment. 

The third member, to be known as the Personnel 
Member, shall be elected by the town employees 
who are subject to this by-law. The term of office 
shall be for two years and shall expire on July 1 , of 
each odd numbered year. The election of the Per- 
sonnel Member shall be secret and be supervised by 
a board of three election officers appointed by the 
Town Moderator. The election shall be held in June 
to be effective on July 1 . Special elections shall be 
held to fill the unexpired term of the Personnel 
Member who resigns before the term has expired. 

At the first meeting of each fiscal year at which all 
Personnel Board Members are present, a chairman 
of the Personnel Board shall be elected by a majori- 
ty vote. 

2. Under Section 12, subtitled GRIEVANCE PRO- 
CEDURE, delete the entire section and substitute 
the following in its place: 

Any dispute between an employee and his super- 
visor, other than salary, shall first be discussed with 
his supervisor. If a conference between the 
employee and his immediate supervisor fails to 
clear up any question to the satisfaction of the 
employee, he may refer the matter in writing to the 
appointing authority. If two weeks have elapsed 
since the submission of the matter in writing to the 
appointing authority and the dispute is still 
unresolved, either party may appeal to the Person- 
nel Board. This Board shall take the question 
under advisement, collecting such facts relating 



thereto as it may deem helpful, and it may, in its 
discretion, hold private or public hearings with 
respect to such question. Not later than thirty days 
after receipt of written submission of the matter to 
it, the Personnel Board shall render its decision and 
hereafter take promptly such action as may be 
necessary and authorized hereunder relative to the 
dispute. 

Under Section 14, subtitled VACATIONS, delete 
from the first sentence of subparagraph A the 
words "On July 1st of each year" 

Under Section 16, subtitled SICK LEAVE, delete 
paragraph (a) and substitute in its place: 

All permanent employees of the Town regardless of 
their length of service will earn twelve (12) days sick 
leave per year. At the end of the calendar year, 
each employee may carry over any unused sick leave 
balance so that 120 days may be accrued. 

Under Section 17, subtitled LEAVES OF AB- 
SENCE, add paragraph c. as follows: 

All permanent, full-time employees are limited to 
three days leave with pay for personal reasons. Per- 
sonal reasons may include business, legal, religious 
or other matters not covered elsewhere by the leave 
provisions of these by-laws. Personal leave will be 
granted for the remedy of problems which cannot 
be conveniently resolved at times other than during 
the customary work day. Specific personal reasons 
need not be given to supervisors, but, except in 
cases of emergency when oral requests may be 
granted, requests for personal leave should be given 
in writing to supervisors at least 48 hours prior to 
the time the leave is to begin. Unused personal days 
will be added to sick days for accrual purposes. 

Under Section 6, subtitled CLASSIFICATION OF 
PRESENT TOWN EMPLOYEES, add paragraphs 
e,f, and g, as follows: 

Jobs shall be classified by the Personnel Board to 
Grade levels based on the extent of personnel and 
budgeting responsibilities and necessary skills, 
training and experience to perform the job as com- 
pared to other Town positions and the provisions of 
Section 10 of this by-law. 

The Wage and Salary Schedule shall be maintained 
by the following criteria: 

Under Section 8, subtitled INCREASES WITHIN 
THE RATE RANGES, delete the section subtitled 
and substitute in its place: "INCREASES WITH- 
IN GRADE LEVELS" and further amending Sec- 
tion 8 by adding the following: 

A step increase in rate for any employee who is 
above Step 1 must be recommended by the 
employee's department head, appointing authority 
or elected official and be approved by the Personnel 
Board. The decision to grant the increase the in- 
crease shall be based solely on the performance of 
the employee during the preceeding 12 month 
period and shall not be beased on length of service. 

Any employee who is at Step 1 will be advanced to 



26 



Step 2 upon reaching the anniversary date. 

8. Under Section 24, subtitled JOB TITLES AND 
STANDARD RATES FOR WAGES AND 
SALARIES OF THE PERSONNEL WAGE AND 
SALARY BY-LAW by deleting therefrom from the 
following positions under Library: Line 1, Libra- 
rian—MLS; Line 2, Librarian MLS (Assisrant); 
Line 4, Senior Assistant Librarian; Line 5, Junior 
Assistant Librarian; Line 6, Clerk; 7. Aides; under 
Recreation Line 2, Director of Summer Program; 
and adding the following positions: under Adminis- 
trative and Clerical: Line 12, Assistant Town Clerk; 
Line 13, Administrative Assistant — Assessor; under 
Library: Line 6, Library Assistant; and changing 
the following job titles: under Library: Line 1, 
Library Director; Line 2, Library Assistant Direc- 
tor; Line 4, Library Department Head; Line 5, 
Library Specialist; Line 7, Library Clerk; under 
Recreation: Line 2, Recreation Director; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Under Article 2A Chairman of the Personnel Board, 
David J. McLachlan, moved that the Town vote to fur- 
ther amend Section 24, subtitled "Job Titles and Stan- 
dard Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage 
and Salary By-Law" to conform to rates of pay negotiated 
by the Town with certain labor organizations, pursuant 
to General Laws, Chapter 150E. 



Current 

7/77 6/78 
AND CLERICAL 
ll,024p 
8,807 p 
7,020 p 
16,592 p 
10,074 p 
500 p 
12,241 p 
850 p 
360 ea 
3.56 hr 
8,960 p. a. 



Proposed 
Level 



ADMINISTRATIVE 

1 . Veteran's Agent 

2. Clerk Senior 
3. Clerk 

4. Town Accountant 

5. Assistant Treasurer 

6. Town Counsel 

7. Selectmen's Admin. Asst 

8. Board of Reg. Clerk 

9. Bd of Reg. 3 Members 

10. Clerk, Part-time 

11. Town Aide 8,960 p. a. 5 

12. Asst. Town Clerk 5 

13. Adm. Asst. to Assessors - 

Assessor — 5 

Motion Carried 

CONSERVATION, PARKS AND CEMETERY 

1. Cemetery Supt. 15,023 p. a. 8 

2. Supt. of Insect & Pest Cont. 1,250 p. a. — 

3. Landscapes Park 4.36 hr 2 

4. Laborer-Park 3.98 hr 1 

5. Unskilled Laborer 2.30 hr *#2 

6 . Skilled Forest Workman 3 . 27 hr 1 

7. Equipment Operator 4.74 hr 4 

8. Park Supt. 15,023 p. a. 9 



Rcmd 

Salary 

12,792 p.a. 

9,396 p.a. 

*#1 

18,126 p.a. 

10,752 p.a. 

500 p.a. 

14,256 p.a. 

850 p.a. 

360 ea 

3.81 hr 

10,368 p.a. 

10,752 p.a. 

10,752 p.a. 



15,744 p.a. 
1,250 p.a. 



16,104 p.a. 



Mr. Everett Olsen made a motion to amend line one 
under Conservation, Parks and Cemetery by deleting the 
figure 8 under proposed level and inserting in place 
thereof the figure 9; further that the recommended salary 
rate on line one of $15,744 be deleted and that the figure 
$17,000. be inserted in place thereof. 

Mr. Olsen then gave a brief explanation of the duties of 
the Cemetery Superintendent. David McLachlan of the 
Personnel Board explained that thru a survey of other 
towns this is where the Personnel Board arrived at the 



figure that they recommended. The Finance Committee 
supported the Personnel's Board figure. Mr. Harry Foster 
questioned why the Park Superintendent received the 
salary he did. Charles McEnnis spoke in favor of Mr. 
Olsen's motion. A vote was taken on the motion to amend 
by voice which left the chair in doubt. Yes 165, No 163. 
Motion to amend defeated, by a count of hands. 

Mr. Colmer moved to reconsider the motion to amend 
Cemetery Superintendent from 15,744 to 17,000. A voice 
vote again left the chair in doubt. A hand count was 
taken 176 Yes, No 170. Motion to reconsider passes. A 
discussion followed. Mr. Olsen moved to reduce his figure 
of $17,000 to now read $16,014 at level nine. Costas 
Kevghas moved the question to stop debate, Motion Car- 
ried, unanimously. A voice vote was taken on the figure 
of $16,104, motion carried. 

Under Conservation, Parks and Cemetery the salary for 
the Cemetery Superintendent is at level 9 with a figure of 
$16,104. A voice vote was taken on lines 1 thru 8 as now 
amended and the motion carried. 



Current Proposed 
7/77-6/78 Level 



CUSTODIAL 
1 . Custodian 

Motion Carried 

" IBRARY 

1 . Library Director 

2. Library Asst. Dir. 

3. Branch Librarian 

4. Librarian, Dept. Head 

5. Librarian Specialist 

6. Librarian Asst. 

7. Librarian Clerk 

8. Aides 

9. Supervisor-Maint. 

Motion Carried 



16,640 p.a. 

11,259 p.a. 
9,487 p.a. 
3.94 hr 
3.56 hr 
3.36 hr 
3.56 hr 
2.30 hr 
4.72 hr 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

1. Highway Supt. 21,332p.a. 

2. Highway Foreman 6.87 hr 

3. Administrative 10.074 p.a. 

Motion Carried 

TOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT 

1. Fire Chief , 26,354 p.a. 

2. Deputy Fire Chief 22,195p.a. 

3. Mechanic (Fire and Police) 6.00 hr 

Motion Carried 

TOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT 

1. Police Chief 27,408 p.a. 

2 . Deputy Chief 22 , 1 95 p . a . 



Rcmd. 
Salary 



17,808 p.a. 

11,856 p.a. 

10,944 p.a. 
4.14 hr 
3.74 hr 
3.56 hr. 
3.74 hr 

2.65 hr *#4 

10,614 p.a. 



12 


21,332 p.a. 


9 


7.21 hr 


5 


■*#1 



*#5 
«#6 
6.34 



Motion Carried 










RECREATION 










1 . Clerk, part-time 




3.56 hr 


2 


3.81 hr. 


2. Recreation Dir. 




l,290p.a. 


*#2 


140.00 wk 




MIN. 


MAX. 


MIN. 


MAX. 


3. Swim. Dir. 


72.80 wk 


104.00 wk 


76.40 wk 


109.20 wk 


4. Swim. Inst. 


72.80 wk 


104.00 wk 


76.40 wk 


109.20 wk 


5. Playgrnd. Dir 


72.80 wk 


104.00 wk 


76.40 wk 


109.20 wk 


6. Playgrnd. Supv. 


72.80 wk 


104.00 wk 


76.40 wk 


109.20 wk 


7. Playgrnd Inst. 


72.80 wk 


104.00 wk 


76.40 wk 


109.20 wk 


8. Sports Inst. 


72.80 wk 


104.00 wk 


76.40 wk 


109.20 wk 



27 



Mr. Robert Charpentier moved to change the title on 
Line #2 from Recreation Director to Summer Director. 
Motion Carried. The voice vote taken on line items 1-8 as 
amended, Motion Carried. 



12,084 p. a. 

#3 
*#3 
*#3 
*#3 
*#3 
3.81 hr 



Wage and Salary Schedule 

July 1, 1978 - June 30, 1979 



YOUTH CENTER 






1. Youth Ctr. Coordinator 


11,499 p. a 




2. Youth Ctr. Supv. 


4.15h 


2 


3. Supervisor IV 


4.02 h 


2 


4. Supervisor III 


3.72 h 


2 


5. Supervisor II 


3.46 h 


2 


6. Supervisor I 


3.20 h 


2 


7. Clerk- Youth 


3.56 h 


2 


Motion Carried 






MISCELLANEOUS 






1 . Animal Inspector 


1,000 p. a 


*#2 


2. Building Inspector 


17,777 p,a 


10 


3. Gas Inspector 


3,750 p. a 


*#2 


4. Electric Inspector 


14,560 p. a 


9 


5 . Sealer of Wghts & Meas. 


2,000 p. a 


*#2 


6. Dog Officer 


7,704 p.a 


2 


7. Asst. Dog Officer 


6,163 p. a 


1 


8. Clock Winder 


100 p.a 


*#2 


Motion Carried 







1,000 


p.a 


7,777 


p.a 


3,750 


p.a 


5,312 


p.a 


2,000 


p.a 


8,142 


p.a 


6.480 


p.a 


100 


p.a 



FOOTNOTES 

*#1 — Represented by Collective Barganing Union 

*#2 — Not in "Job Rating Plan" 

*#3 — No percentage increase — range only 

*#4 — Federal Minimum Hour Wage 

*#5 — Salary will be 200% of the highest paid union firefighter 

established 
*#6 — Salary will be 84% of the Fire Chief established by State Law 
*#7-Salary will be 81% of the Police Chief 



III. 

IV. 

V. 
VI. 



The minimum salary for Grade Level 1 shall 
be determined by the Personnel Board. 

The minimum salary for each grade level 
above grade level 1 shall be an amount that 
his greater than the minimum salary of grade 
level 1 by a factor that is the difference bet- 
ween the number of the grade level and the 
number 1 multiplied by .15 plus 1. Example: 
Grade level 6 is 1.75 greater than grade level 
1. Calculation: (6-1) x .15 - 1.00 = 1.75. 

The maximum salary for any grade level will 
be 1.38 times the minimum salary for that 
level. 

There are 20 steps in each grade level. Each 
incremental step is 2% of the minimum salary 
for that grade level. 

The Wage and Salary Schedule will be stated 
in annual dollars. 

Hourly rates for those jobs that are paid on an 
hourly basis will be the annual salary divided 
by 2088 (52.2 weeks times 40 hours) for jobs 
designated "Mechanical and Construction, 
Conservation and Cemeteries, Custodian and 
Health" and will be the annual salary divided 
by 1957.5 (52.2 weeks x 37.5 hours), for jobs 
designated as administrative and clerical. 



Grade Level 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 



Salary Range 
6,000 - 8,280 
6,900 - 9,522 
7,800-10,764 
8,700-12,006 
9,600-13,248 
10,500- 14,490 



11,400 
12,300 
13,200 
14,100 
15,000 
15,900 
16,800 
17,700 
18,600 
19,500 



- 15,732 

- 16,974 

- 18,216 

- 19,458 
-20,700 
-21,942 
-23,184 

- 24,426 
-25,668 
-26,910 



Under Article 3 Philip J. McCormack, Town 
Treasurer moved that the Town vote to transfer from 
Federal Revenue Sharing Funds the sum of $600,000.00 
to defray town charges for the fiscal period from July 1 , 
1978, to June 30, 1979, and to apply these sums as 
follows: 



Fire Department Salaries 

Line Item 67 

Regular and substitute Account 



Police Department Salaries 

Line Item 139 

Regular and Special Account 

Unclassified Departments 
Line Item 270 
Preliminary Project Study 



$290,000.00 



$290,000.00 



$ 20,000.00 



and further vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$21,193,048.00 as may be required to defray Town 
Charges for the fiscal period from July 1, 1978 to June 30, 
1979. 

Mr. Sullivan of the Finance Committee made a presen- 
tation on Comparative Costs for Town Departments for 
the coming year. A printed paper was distributed with 
the departments cost and transfers from the Finance 
Committee Reserve Fund. 



*Subject to collective bargaining 



Accounting Department 

SALARIED: 

1 . Accountant 

2. Senior Clerk (3) 

3. Severance 

4. Vacation and Sickness 

TOTAL 
Motion Carried 



Fin Com 
Rcmdtn. 



$18,126.00 

*26,421.00 

0.00 

750.00 

$45,297.00 



28 



EXPENSES: 
5 Expenses 1,500.00 

6. Outlay 0-00 

TOTAL 1,500.00 

TOTAL ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT $46,797.00 
Motion Carried 

ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 

7. Inspector's Salary 1,000.00 

8. Expense 100.00 

TOTAL ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S 

DEPARTMENT $1,100.00 

Motion Carried 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

9. Clerk hire 2,527.00 

10. Expenses 2,343.00 

11. Outlay Account 0.00 

TOTAL BOARD OF APPEALS $4,870.00 

Motion Carried 

ASSESSOR'S 

SALARIES: 

12. Assessor (Full time) 17,687.00 

13. Board Member (Part time) 8,492.00 

14. Assistant Assessor 10,752.00 

15. Senior Clerk (2) 1 Clerk (Level 1) *24, 634.00 

16. CM. A. Compensation 1,000.00 

TOTAL $62,565.00 

*Subject to Collective Bargaining 

Richard Codling questioned the Assistant Assessor 
position. Mr. Sullivan of the Finance Committee explain- 
ed that this position and the others like it in other depart- 
ments is for those who supervise and etc. in the absence of 
the department head. It is not creating a new position. 
George Swallow spoke and informed the Town Meeting 
Body that this position was presently being held by a 
CETA employee, and is federal paid program. Again Mr. 
Sullivan stated that Mr. Swallow was wrong that the in- 
dividual holding this position was presently a Sr. Clerk, 
employed by the town. A voice vote was taken on the 
Assessor's Department Salaries: 

Motion Carried 

EXPENSES 

17. Office Expenses $ 5,000.00 

18. Transportation 1,000.00 

19. Outlays 225.00 

20. Data Proc. (Tax Billing) 5,400.00 



TOTAL 

Motion Carried 

BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATION COMM. 

21. Expenses- Annual Operation 

22. Accumulation Fund (1975-1076) 



$74,190.00 



0.00 
0.00 



BUILDING INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 
Includes: Zoning By-Law Enforcement 

23. Inspector's Salary $ 17,777.00 

24. Sr. Clerk *8,807.00 

25. Vacation & Sickness 1.00 

26. Transportation 1,511.00 

27. Inspector's Expenses 2,496.00 

28. Out of Town Expenses 275.00 

29. Plumbing Insp. (Fees & Transfers) 2,000.00 



TOTAL BUILDING INSP. DEPT. 
Motion Carried 



$ 32,867.00 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT (for total Dept. fig. see 
ADJ. meetinf of 4/26/78). 

Mr. Sullivan of the Finance Committee, made a mo- 
tion to table Line items 32 and 33. Motion Carried. 

SALARIES 



30. 


$ 300.00 


31. Superintendent 


16,104.00 


Motion Carried 




34. Interments 


5,000.00 


35. Transportation Superintendent 


300.00 


36. Expenses 


11,000.00 


Outlays 


1,000.00 


37. Out of State 


300.00 


38. Restore Forefather's and Hart Pond 


1,500.00 


Motion Carried 




CIVILIAN DEFENSE 




39. Expenses 


$ 4,200.00 


40. Outlays 


1,550.00 


TOTAL CIVILIAN DEFENSE 


$ 5,750.00 


Motion Carried 




CONSERVATION COMMISSION 




41. Expenses 


$13,975.00 


TOTAL CONSERVATION COMMISSION $13,975.00 


CONSTABLE 




42. Constable's Salary 


$ 130.00 



TOTAL BICENTENNIAL CELEB. COMM.$ 0.00 
Motion Carried 



TOTAL CONSTABLE'S SALARY $ 130.00 
Motion Carried 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

43. Expenses $ 8,300.00 

44. Transportation Expenses 3,000.00 

TOTAL COUNCIL ON AGING $11,300.00 
Motion Carried 

DEBT AND INTEREST 

45. High School Loan No. 1 0.00 

46. High School Loan No. 2 0.00 

47. South Row Elementary School Loan 45,000.00 

48 . Junior High School Loan 1 1 , 000 . 00 

49. Westland Elem. School and 

Harrington Elem . School Loan 1 60 , 000 . 00 

50. Byam Elementary School Loan 105,000.00 

51. High School- 1972#1 850,000.00 

240,000.00 



52. High School. 1972#2 



TOTAL DEBT 



$1,510,000.00 



29 



Interest 

52. High School Loan No. 1 

53. High School Loan No. 2 

54. Anticipation of Revenue and 
Reimbursement Loans 

55. South Row Elem. School Loan 

56. Junior High School 

57. Westland Elem. School and 
Harrington Elem. School Loan 

58. Byam Elementary School Loan 

59. High School- 1972#1 
59a. High School -1972#2 

INTEREST TOTAL 

TOTAL DEBT AND INTEREST 

Motion Carried 

DOG OFFICER 

SALARIES: 

60. Dog Officer 

61 . Assistant Dog Officer 

62. Expenses 

TOTAL DOG OFFICER 

Motion Carried 

EDWARDS MEMORIAL BEACH 

63. Expenses 

TOTAL EDWARDS MEMORIAL BEACH 
Motion Carried 

ELECTIONS 

64. Wages and Expenses 

TOTAL ELECTIONS 
Motion Carried 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

65. Expenses 

TOTAL FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Motion Carried 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES 

66. Officers and Administration 

67. Regular and Substitute Account 

68. Severance Pay 



0.00 
0.00 


50,000.00 

4,725.00 

20,638.00 


64,500.00 

70,950.00 

168,300.00 

35,280.00 


$ 414,393.00 


$1,924,393.00 



750.00 

100.00 

1.00 



8,142.00 
6,480.00 
1,600.00 

$ 16,222.00 



500.00 



500.00 



$ 17,450.00 
$ 17,450.00 



1,500.00 



$ 1,500.00 



$ 143. 
l,104 i 



244.00 

202.00 

0.00 



TOTAL 


•$1 


247,446.00 


EXPENSES: 

69. Maintenance and Equipment 

70. Outlays 

71. Out of State 

72. Stabilization Fund (Equipment) 




64,270.00 

9,770.00 

400.00 

15,000.00 



TOTAL 



89 : 

$1,336. 



TOTAL FIRE DEPARTMENT 
Appropriations from Federal Revenue Share 
for Salaries 290 



440.00 
886.00 



Cost to Town 



000.00 
$1,046,886.00 



75. Transportation 

76. Out of Town Expense 

77. Vacation and Sickness 

TOTAL GAS PIPING & FIXTURE DEPT. 
Motion Carried 

HEALTH & SANITATION DEPARTMENT 

78. Board Members 

79. Director of Public Health 

80. Senior Clerk 

81. Physicians 

82. Vacation and Sickness 

83. Inspector 

TOTAL 

EXPENSES: 

84. Health and Professional Services 

85. Mosquito Control Study 

86. Transportation Directors 

87. Other Expenses 

88. Out of State Expenses 

89. Outlay 

90. Blood Program 

91. Inspector's Transportation 



TOTAL 9,500.00 

TOTAL HEALTH & SANITATION DEPT. $54,576.00 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Mr. William Murphy, moved to table this budget. Mo- 
tion Carried. 



5,225.00 


T 

828.00 


21,352.00 


9,396.00 


1,000.00 


500.00 


12,000.00 


45,076.00 


4,000.00 


400.00 


1,650.00 


1,900.00 


300.00 


0.00 


250.00 


1,000.00 



GAS PIPING & FIXTURE DEPARTMENT 

73. Inspectors Salary 3,750.00 

74. Expenses 624.00 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

101 Expenses 

TOTAL HISTORICAL COMM. 
Motion Carried 

HOME RULE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

102. Expenses 

TOTAL HOME RULE ADVISORY COM. 
Motion Carried 

HYDRANT SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

103. Center 

104. North 

105. East 

106. South 

TOTAL HYDRANT SERVICE DEPT. 
Motion Carried 

INSECT PEST CONTROL 

107. Superintendent's Salary 

108. Expenses 

TOTAL INSECT PEST CONTROL 
Motion Carried 

INSURANCE DEPARTMENT 

109. Prop. Liab. & All Types of Insurance $246,215.00 

110. Chapter 32B Insurance-Employees 333,500.00 



$1,550.00 
$1,550.00 



400.00 



400.00 



$34,760.00 

15,160.00 

6,580.00 

4,200.00 

$60,700.00 



1,250.00 
12,850.00 

$14,100.00 



TOTAL INSURANCE DEPARTMENT 

Motion Carried 



$579,715.00 



30 



LAW DEPARTMENT 
SALARIES: 

111. Town Counsel 500.00 

112. Legal Services 20,000.00 

113. Misc. Exp. Association Dues 2,500.00 

TOTAL LAW DEPARTMENT $ 23,000.00 

Motion Carried 

LIBRARY DEPARTMENT 
SALARIES: 

114. Librarian $17,808.00 

115. Assistant Director 11,856.00 

116. Branch Librarian 10,944.00 

117. Assistant Librarians 94,636.00 

118. Library Aides 6,210.00 

119. Custodial & Security 14,295.00 

120. Vacation & Sickness 3,277.00 

TOTAL $159,026.00 

The quorum was questioned, there were 201 voters left 
in the hall. 

EXPENSES: 

121. Repair & Maintenance of Buildings 3,640.00 

122. Fuel, Light and Water 14,718.00 

123. Books and Periodicals 55,000.00 

124. Other Expenses 8,560.00 

125. Outlays 2,400.00 

TOTAL $84,318.00 

Total Library Department $243 , 344 . 00 

State Funds Received 11,906.00 

NET LIBRARY DEPARTMENT $231 ,438.00 

Motion Carried 

Mr. Harry Foster made a motion to reconsider Article 
2. The Selectmen and the Finance Committee were 
against this. The moderator noted that the required 
quorum is 200, at this point there was less than 200 voters 
present. The Town Meeting was then adjourned at 10:55 
PM to Wednesday night at 7:30. 

ADJOURNED 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

April 26, 1978 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 8:00 PM the Moderator recognized the presence 
of a quorum there were 329 voters present. 

Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, William R. Mur- 
phy, on behalf of the Board and the Town of 
Chelmsford, introduced two A.F.S. Students. Eardley Di- 
jkstra from Auckland, New Zealand, he is staying with 
the McKeown Family, and Andrew Skarupa from West 
Berlin, Germany, he is staying with the Musgrove Family. 
Mr. Murphy gave the students a certificate from the 
Town. 

Selectmen William Murphy moved to remove from the 
table line items 32 and 33 of the Cemetery Department. 
Motion Carried, unanimously. 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

32. General Labor 
Motion Carried 

33. Special Labor for Lot Owners 
Motion Carried. 



$45,986.00 
$ 1,000.00 
$68,390.00 
$82,490.00 



TOTAL 
Motion Carried 

TOTAL CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 
Motion Carried 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Selectman William Murphy moved to remove from the 
table line items 92 thru 100. Motion Carried. 

SALARIES: 

92. Administration 

93. Engineer's Fees 

94. Labor - Men 

TOTAL 
Motion Carried 

EXPENSES: 

95. Utilities-Materials-Misc. 

96. Waste Collection 

97. Stabilization Fund 

98. Machine Hire - Other 

99. Snow & Ice 
100. Sidewalks 



$ 64,926.00 

10,000.00 

624,997.00 

$699,923.00 



$183,054.00 

73,290.00 

10,000.00 

24,000.00 

200,000.00 

7,000.00 



TOTAL $ 4,97,344.00 

Total Highway Department $1,197,267.00 

Appropriation from Antirecession Fund 0.00 

COST TO TOWN $1,197,267.00 

Motion Carried 



MODERATOR 

126. Moderator's Salary 
Motion Carried 



300.00 



NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL- 

Chelmsford 

Assessment 47.22% $580,666.00 
Motion Carried 

PARK DEPARTMENT 

127. Superintendent's Salary 16,104.00 

128. Labor 4,000.00 

129. Expenses 3,000.00 

130. Outlays 0.00 

131. Recreation Field Maint. Labor 4,500.00 

132. Recreation Field Maint. Expense 3,000.00 



TOTAL PARK DEPARTMENT 


$ 30,604.00 


Motion Carried 




PERSONNEL BOARD 




133. Expenses 


$ 650.00 


Motion Carried 




PLANNING BOARD 




134. Clerk Hire 


$ 2,000.00 


135. Expenses 


1,000.00 


136. Outlay 


200.00 


137. Consultant 


5,000.00 



31 



TOTAL PLANNING BOARD DEPT. $ 8,200.00 

Motion Carried 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES: 

138. Officers and Administration $ 214,070.00 

139. Regular and Special Account 804,852.00 

140. School Traffic Supervisors 0.00 

TOTAL $1,018,922.00 

141. K-9 Officer and Expenses 0.00 

142. Maintenance and Equipment 89,742.00 

143. Chiefs Out of State Expense 150.00 

144. Outlays 7,083.00 

145. Special and Education Out of State 500.00 

146. Regional Tactical Unit Expenses 1.00 

TOTAL $ 97,476.00 

Total Police Department *$1 , 1 16.398.00 

147. Appropriation from Federal Revenue 

Sharing for Salaries 290,000.00 

TOTAL COST TO TOWN $826,398.00 

Motion Carried. 

*The Moderator read this figure as the Total Cost for 
the Town and a vote was taken where as the motion car- 
ried. Mr. Sullivan of the Finance Committee made a mo- 
tion to reconsider the Police Department Budget, due 
that the wrong figure was voted on. Motion Carried. The 
correct figure of $826,398.00 was then read and voted on. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES: 

149. Janitor's Salary 

150. Vacation and Sickness 

TOTAL 

EXPENSES: 

151. Fuel, Light and Water 

152. Repairs, Equipment and Expenses 

153. Outlays 

TOTAL 

TOTAL PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPT. 

Motion Carried 

RECREATION COMMISSION 

154. Salaries, Directors & Ass't Youth 

155. Expenses, Youth 

156. Outlay 

TOTAL RECREATION DEPT. 

Motion Carried 

EAST SCHOOL 

157. Expenses 

158. Salaries, Custodians 

159. Recreational Supervisor 

TOTAL EAST SCHOOL 
Motion Carried 



$ *8,171.00 
380.00 

8,551.00 



26,400.00 

7,500.00 

0.00 

33,900.00 
42,451.00 



26,178.00 

92,003.00 

1,500.00 

$119,681.00 



9,188.00 
1.00 
1.00 

9,190.00 



REGISTRAR'S DEPARTMENT 




SALARIES: 




160. Registrars 


$ 1,080.00 


161. Ass't Registrars Wages & Mileage 


0.00 


162. Clerk 


8,807.00 


163. Clerk for Board 


884.00 


TOTAL 


$10,771.00 


EXPENSES: 




164. Printing: Men & Women Directory 


$1,100.00 


165. Printing: Voters' Lists 


250.00 


166. Other Expenses 


800.00 


167. Data Processing 


3,600.00 


168. Census 


3,719.00 


TOTAL 


9,469.00 


TOTAL REGISTRAR'S DEPT 


$20,240.00 



Motion Carried 

SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 

169. Clerk 

MOTION CARRIED, UNANIMOUSLY 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

170. School Committee 

171. Superintendent's Office 

172. Supervision 
173. 
174. 
175. 
176. 
177. 
178. 
179. 
180. 
181. 
182. 
183. 
184. 
185. 
186. 
187. 
188. 
189. 
190. 
191. 
192. 
193. 



0.00 



Principals 

Teaching 

Textbooks 

Library 

Audio-Visual 

Guidance 

Career Education 

School Attendance 

Health Services 

Transportation 

Food Services 

Athletics 

Other Student Activities 

Custodial 

Utilities 

Maintenance of Grounds 

Maintenance of Buildings 

Maintenance of Equipment 

Adult Education 

Civic Activities 

Programs with other schools 



Subtotal 
194. Chapter 766 

Total 
"Minus PL875 

Subtotal 

Minus Educational Collaborative Fund 



TOTAL TOWN FUNDS $13,415,819.00 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

206. Salary 2,000.00 

207. Expenses 300.00 

TOTAL $2,300.00 

Motion Carried 



40,725.00 


295,320.00 


270,869.00 


641,265.00 


7,754,641.00 


134,311.00 


286,500.00 


121,540.00 


370,861.00 


41,276.00 


19,080.00 


86,052.00 


738,285.00 


56,616.00 


133,969.00 


32,500.00 


645,122.00 


516,350.00 


59,450.00 


87,000.00 


89,050.00 


22,007.00 


12,500.00 


15,000.00 


$12,470,289.00 


1,138,130.00 


$13,608,419.00 


170,200.00 


13,438,219.00 


22,400.00 



32 



SELECTMEN'S DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES: 

208. Chairman 1,500.00 

209. Board Members 4,000.00 

210. Selectmen Administrative Ass, t. 14,256.00 

211. Labor Relations advisor 5,000.00 

212. Clerk (part-time) 5,567.00 

213. Senior Clerk (full-time) 9,396.00 

214. Purchasing Agent 0.00 

215. Town Planner 0.00 

216. Recreation Supervisor 0.00 

217. Clerk - Overtime 1,504.00 

TOTAL 41,223.00 

EXPENSES: 

218. Expenses 7,504.00 

219. Conference Expenses 1,000.00 

220. Outlays 0.00 

221. Out of State 250.00 

222. Purchasing Agent 1,578.00 

223 . Local Growth Policy Comm . 0.00 

224. Photo Copy Machine 7,740.00 

225. Insurance of Selectmen 0.00 

TOTAL $18,072.00 

TOTAL SELECTMEN'S DEPT. $59,295.00 
Motion Carried 

SEWER COMMISSION DEPARTMENT 

226. Professional Fee $1,000.00 

227. Expenses 500.00 

TOTAL SEWER COMM. DEPT. $1,500.00 
Motion Carried 

STREET LIGHTING 

228. Street Lighting $85,000.00 
Motion Carried 

TOWN AIDE 

229. Salary $10,368.00 

230. Expenses 725.00 

TOTAL $11,093.00 
Motion Carried 

TOWN CELEBRATION OMMITTEE 5,000.00 
Motion Carried 

TOWN CLERK'S DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES: 

232. Town Clerk $16,352.00 

233. Assistant Town Clerk 10,752.00 

234. Senior Clerk (1) *8,807.00 

235. Clerk (part-time) *3,669.00 

236. Clerk (Overtime) 1,700.00 

237. Vacation and Sickness 800.00 

TOTAL $42,080.00 

EXPENSES: 

238. Expenses 4,700:00 

239. Printing By-Law Books 500.00 

240. Outlays 1.00 

TOTAL $5,201.00 

TOTAL TOWN CLERK DEPT. $47,281.00 
Motion Carried 



TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 
241 . Expenses 
Motion Carried 



$150.00 



TREASURER & COLLECTOR DEPARTMENT 



SALARIES: 

242. Treasurer and Collector 

243. Assistant Treasurer 

244. Senior Clerk 

245. Clerks (part-time) 

246. Vacation and Sickness 



$19,955.00 

10,752.00 

*35,228.00 

4,625.00 

750.00 



TOTAL 


$71,310.00 


EXPENSES: 




247. Postage 


9,000.00 


248. Printing, Advertising, Binding & Stat. 


2,000.00 


249. Bonds 


850.00 


250. Expenses 


3,800.00 


251. Outlays 


1.00 


252. Data Processing Payroll 


16,000.00 



TOTAL 
TOTAL TREAS. & COLL. DEPT. 
Motion Carried 

TREE WARDEN'S DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES: 



$31,651.00 
$102,961.00 



253. Tree Warden 


800.00 


254. Fees 


4,000.00 


TOTAL 


$4,800.00 


EXPENSES: 




255. Other Expenses 


$14,500.00 


256. Outlay 


600.00 


TOTAL 


$15,100.00 


TOTAL TREE WARDEN DEPT. 


$15,100.00 


Motion Carried 




UNCLASSIFIED DEPARTMENTS 




257. Town & Finance Committee Reports 


$10,000.00 


258. CATV Committee 


50.00 


259. Expenses for Memorial Day 


1,500.00 


260. Expenses for Town Clock 


525.00 


261. Ambulance Service 


10,000.00 


262. Lowell Mental Health Association 


8,695.00 


263. Veteran Pension Claims 


5,299.00 


264. D.P.W. Committee 


0.00 


265. Historic District Committee 


705.00 


266. Bus Transportation Subsidy 


28,000.00 


267. Share Inc. (Drug Rehabilitation) 


23,737.00 


268. NMAC Assessment 


8,592.00 


269. Unemployment Benefits Due State 


95,000.00 


270. Preliminary Project Study 


20,000.00 


TOTAL 


$212,103.00 


Appropriation from Federal Revenue Sharing 


for Preliminary Project Study 


20,000.00 


TOTAL COST FOR TOWN 


$192,103.00 


Motion Carried 




VARNEY PLAYGROUND 




271. Labor 


3,000.00 


272. Expenses 


3,000.00 



33 



273. Outlays 1,600.00 

TOTAL VARNEY PLAYGROUND 
Motion Carried 

VETERAN'S BENEFITS DEPARTMENT 

274. Salary of Veteran's Agent 

275. Clerical 

276. Expenses 

277. Outlays 

278. Cash and Material Grants 

TOTAL VETERANS BENEFITS DEPT. 
Motion Carried 

WIRING INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 

Mr. Charles McLaughlin moved to increase the Inspec- 
tors Salary from $15,312. to $18,000. The Finance Com- 
mittee, the Personnel Board and the Selectmen were 
against this motion. A voice vote was taken, motion 
defeated. 



$7,600.00 



$12,792.00 

*8,807.00 

2,400.00 

150.00 

80,000.00 

$104,149.00 



279. Inspector's Salary 

280. Expenses 

281. Senior Clerk (1,4) 

282. Vacation and Sickness 

283. Transportation 

284. Out of Town Expenses 

TOTAL WIRING INSPECTOR'S DEPT. 
Motion Carried 

YOUTH CENTER 

285. Salaries 

286. Expenses 

287. Outlay 

TOTAL YOUTH CENTER 

Motion Carried 



$15,312.00 

1,040.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1,500.00 

275.00 

$18,129.00 



$24,239.00 
8,658.00 
1,100.00 

$33,997.00 



The Board of Selectmen moved to withdraw the follow- 
ing articles: 7, 13, 29, 30, 42, 44, 45, 51, 52. Motion Car- 
ried. 

Under Article 4 Treasurer Philip J. McCormack mov- 
ed that the Town vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money 
from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning July 1, 1978; in accordance with 
the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, 
and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one 
year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a 
period of less than one year in accordance with General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 5 Treasurer Philip J. McCormack mov- 
ed that the Town vote to request the Department of Cor- 
porations and Taxation Division of Accounts of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts to make an audit of all ac- 
counts in all departments in the Town of Chelmsford. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 6 Selectman William R. Murphy moved 
that the Town vote to transfer $20,000.00 from Federal 
Revenue Sharing Funds to engage an outside Auditing 



Firm to make an audit of all accounts in all Departments 
in the Town of Chelmsford. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 7 Selectman William R. Murphy moved 
to withdraw this article. 

Motion Carried 



Under Article 8 Selectman William R. Murphy moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$428,130.37 to pay the treasurer of Middlesex County 
Retirement System, the said amount being the Town's 
share of the pension, expanse and military service funds. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 9 Finance Committee Chairman 
Richard Sullivan moved that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $150,000.00 to be used as a 
Reserve Fund at the discretion of the Finance Committee, 
as provided in General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6. 

Motion Carried 



Under Article 10 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed that the Town vote to authorize the transfer of reim- 
bursement funds in the sum of $88,888.00 received from 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Flood Relief Board 
and the transfer of $11,112.00 from Free Cash to pay a 
bond issue note or notes totaling $100,000.00 borrowed 
for the purpose of reconstruction of Crystal Lake. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 11 Mr. Paul Galpin moved to amend 
this article to use midsized sedans. A voice vote was taken, 
motion defeated. 

Selectman William R. Murphy moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $40,000.00 for 
the purpose of purchasing six (6) new four-door sedans to 
be used by the Police Department, said purchase to be 
made under the supervision of the Board of Selectmen; 
and to authorize the Selectmen to transfer by a good and 
sufficient bill of sale, one (1) 1976; and four (4) 1977 
cruisers now being used by the Police Department. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 12 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1,550.00 to match LEAA Federal Funds, for the pur- 
pose to provide mutual aid programs for the Police 
Department. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 13 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed to withdraw this article. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 14 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$71,130.00 for the purchase of Equipment for the 
Highway Department, such purchase to be made under 



34 



the supervision of the Board of Selectmen, and to author- 
ize the Board of Selectmen, to dispose of equipment 
presently being used by the Highway Department as 
follows: 

(a) To purchase one (1) Dump Truck for the Highway 
Department and sell by good and sufficient bill of sale 
one (1) dump truck presently being used by the Highway 
Department. 

(b) To sell by good and sufficient bill of sale two (2) 
sweeper brooms being used by the Highway Department. 

(c) To purchase one (1) Air compressor and sell by good 
and sufficient bill of sale one (1) air compressor presently 
being used by the Highway Department. 

(d) To purchase one (1) Cab and Chassis and sell by good 
and sufficient bill of sale one (1) cab and chassis presently 
being used by the Highway Department. 

(e) To purchase one (1) Sander Body for the Highway 
Department and to sell by good and sufficient bill of sale 
one (1) sander body presently being used by the Highway 
Department. 

(f) To Purchase one (1) half-ton pick-up for the Highway 
Department and to sell by good and sufficient bill of sale 
one (1) half- ton pick-up truck presently being used by the 
Highway Department. 

(g) To purchase one (1) two cubic yard loader for the 
Highway Department and to sell by good and sufficient 
bill of sale one (1) two cubic yard loader presently being 
used by the Highway Department. 

(h) To purchase two (2) Snow Plows. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 15 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$50,000.00 to alleviate certain drainage problems, 
throughout the Town, as determined by the Board of 
Selectmen. The Finance Committee recommends the ar- 
ticle. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 17 Everett V. Olsen Cemetery Commis- 
sioner moved that the Town vote to transfer $5,000.00 
from the sale of Graves and Lots to Cemetery Improve- 
ment Development Fund. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 18 Everett V. Olsen Cemetery Commis- 
sioner moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $ 1 6 , 200 . 00 for the purchase of one ( 1 ) two ton 
dump truck for the Cemetery Department. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 19 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed that the Town vote to accept a trust under the will of 
Christopher Roby for the purpose of improving and 
beautifying the West Chelmsford Cemetery and the 
streets and sidewalks of said village, and for the support 
of preaching and relieving the necessities of the poor in 
said village; and to designate the Cemetery Commis- 



sioners as agents of the Town to administer said trust. 
Motion Carried 

Under Article 20 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$25,000.00 for the implementation of a part of the Re- 
creation Master Plan. The Finance Committee opposes 
the article. The Selectmen do not recommend the article. 
Mr. Charpentier spoke for the article. 

Motion Defeated 

Under Article 21 Mr. Robert Charpentier moved to 
withdraw this article. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 22 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$10,000.00 for the final design plan of Central Square 
traffic improvements. A discussion followed. A vote was 
taken by voice, which left the chair in doubt, the follow- 
ing tellers were appointed: 



Ina Greenblatt 
Gene Doody 
Connie Fabien 
Dorothy Lerer 



Richard Burtt 

Julian Zabierek 

Ruth Delaney 

Margaret Johnson 



Those in favor of the motion 105 those against 127. 
Motion Defeated 

Under Article 23 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$100,000.00 for the construction of sidewalks. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 24 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1,800.00 to be used to join or buy into the Merrimack 
Valley Home Care Center, Inc. for the purpose of obtain- 
ing services for the care of the Town's older Americans. 
The Finance Committee is in favor of this article. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 25 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed to table this article till the next adjourned session. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 26 John Balco of the Conservation 
Commission moved to table this article till the next ad- 
journed session. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 27 Jean Paul J. Gravell moved that the 
Town vote to approve the filing of a Petition in the 
General Court under the provisions of Section 8 of Article 
89 of the Amendments to the Constitution for a special 
act: 

Enabling the Town of Chelmsford to hold its Annual 
Town Meeting at two separate and distinct times. Each 
meeting to be called in pursuance of a separate warrant 
under the hands of the Selectmen, notice of which shall 






35 



be given at least seven (7) days before such meeting as 
prescribed in Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 39, 
Section 9. One meeting may be held in February, March, 
April, or May and one meeting may be held in 
September, October or November. The Selectmen shall 
insert in the warrants for the annual meetings all sub- 
jects, the insertion of which shall be requested of them in 
writing by ten or more registered voters of the Town and 
as prescribed by Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 39, 
Section 10. An Article for the election of Town officers 
and an Article covering the Town's annual budget shall 
be contained in the warrant for the annual town meeting 
to be held in February, March, April or May. The 
Finance Committee is against the article, also the Board 
of Selectmen. 

Motion Defeated 

Under Article 28 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed that the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws Ar- 
ticle VI Police Regulations Section 18 Regulation of 
Motor Boats on Crystal Lake as follows: 

1 . By amending the title of Section 1 8 to read Regulation 
of Motor Boats and Recreational Vehicles on Crystal 
Lake. 

2. By adding the words "including snowmobiles" im- 
mediately after the words "vehicle powered by an 
engine." 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 29 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed to withdraw this article. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 30 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed to withdraw this article. 

Motion Carried 

Mr. A. Robert Rabb, Chairman of the Planning Board 
moved to postpone articles 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 38, 39 and 
40 till the next adjourned session. 

Motion Carried 

Selectman William R. Murphy moved to adjourn till 
May 11th at 7:30 PM. Motion carried. The Town 
Meeting adjourned at 10:50 PM. 



36 



ADJOURNED 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 11, 1978 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order by the Moderator, who recognized the presence of a 
quorum. Selectman William R. Murphy moved to pro- 
claim the week of May 14th through May 20th, as 
Municipal Clerk Week, and wished to have this motion 
recorded in the minutes by the Town Clerk Mary E. 
St.Hilaire, as she is the official keeper of the Town 
Meeting Minutes. Motion Carried. 

Under Article 25 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed to withdraw article 25. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 26 John McCormack Chairman of the 
Conservation Commission, moved that the Town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $7,000.00 and transfer 
the sum of $7,000.00 from the Conservation Trust Fund 
to acquire by fee simple a certain parcel of land in accor- 
dance with Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 132 A 
and Chapter 40: 

Said parcel of land being described as follows: 

A certain parcel of land in Chelmsford, Middlesex Coun- 
ty, Massachusetts situated on the Northwesterly side of 
Acton Road being shown as Lot A on a plan entitled 
"Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Mass. prepared for Sarah 
F. Ferguson, scale: 1" = 50' May 1977, Emmons, Flem- 
ing and Bienvenu Inc., Engineers and Surveyors, One 
Survey Circle, No. Billerica, Mass. "bounded and 
described as follows: 



SOUTHEASTERLY: 



SOUTHERLY: 



By a stone wall by various 
courses as shown on said plan 
399.10 feet and by Acton Road 
as shown on said plan 371.87 
feet. 



By a stone wall as shown on 
said plan 32.66 feet. 

SOUTHWESTERLY: By a stone wall as shown on 
said plan 293 feet. 

WESTERLY: By land now or formerly of 

Donoghue as shown on said 
plan 955 feet. 

NORTHERLY: By said Donoghue Land as 

shown on said plan 69.56 feet. 

NORTHWESTERLY: By said Donoghue land as 
shown on said plan 120.70 feet. 

NORTHEASTERLY: By land now or formerly of 
Hague as shown onplan261.15 
feet. 

SOUTHEASTERLY: By Lot B as shown on said plan 
327.24 feet. 

NORTHEASTERLY: By Lot B as shown on said plan 
334.63 feet. 

Containing 8.65 acres according to said plan. Said land is 
to be held, managed, and controlled by the Conservation 
Commission for the promotion and development of the 



natural resources and for the purpose of acquiring said 
land, that the Conservation Commission be authorized to 
enter into a contractual self help agreement with the of- 
fice of Environmental Affairs. 

Motion Carried 

Selectman William R. Murphy moved to recess the An- 
nual Town Meeting at 7:55 PM and to go onto the 
Special Town Meeting, Motion Carried 

The Special Town Meeting of May 11, 1978, was called 
to order at 7:56 PM by the Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, 
who recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 
598 people present. Selectman Murphy moved to waive 
the reading of the Constable's Return of Service and the 
posting of the warrant. It was so voted. Selectman 
Shanahan moved that the reading of the entire warrant 
be waived. It was so voted. 

Under Article 1 Selectman Murphy moved that the 
Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to expend, upon 
receipt, the sum of $34,214.00 from funds received from 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Flood Relief Board 
to pay a bond issue note or notes in the amount of 
$34,214.00 borrowed for the purpose of the restoration of 
Crystal Lake. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 2 Selectman Murphy moved that the 
Town vote to transfer from the stabilization fund the sum 
of $18,500.00 for the purchase of one sidewalk snowplow 
tractor; such purchase to be made under the supervision 
of the Board of Selectmen. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 3 Selectman Murphy moved that the 
Town vote to transfer the sum of $7,456.34 from Anti- 
recession fiscal assistance funds and transfer the sum of 
$8,333.34 from Unclassified Department Line Item 261, 
Ambulance Service Account to the Insurance Depart- 
ment Line Item 110, Chapter 32 B- Insurance- Employees 
Account. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 4 Myra Silver of the School Committee 
moved that the Town vote to accept Section 71 E of 
Chapter 639, an act which would permit the School Com- 
mittee to expend receipts received from certain pro- 
grams. 

The Finance Committee does not recommend the arti- 
cle, William Sharpley from the school committee ex- 
plains the purpose of the article. 

Mr. Sharpley entertained questions from the Town 
Meeting Body. A voice vote was taken. 

Motion Defeated 



37 



Under Article 5 Selectman William R. Murphy, mov- 
ed that the Town vote to accept Chapter 41, Section 
100B, Indemnification of Retired Police Officers and 
Fire Fighters for certain hospital, etc., Expenses. 

A motion was made by Selectman Murphy to refer the 
above mentioned article to a committee. A voice vote was 
taken. Motion Carried. 

Under Article 6 Selectman William R. Murphy, mov- 
ed that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1 ,200.00 to obtain the necessary plans, profiles and legal 
descriptions for the acceptance of LaFayette Terrace. 

Selectman Carson gave a brief explanation on the 
street acceptance. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 7 Selectman William R. Murphy, mov- 
ed that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $10,000.00 
from Unclassified Department Unemployment Benefits 
due the State Account and the sum of $37,600.00 from 
the Reserve Fund Account to the following accounts: 

A. Cemetery Department, General Labor the sum of 
$4,000.00. 

B. Fire Department, officers and administration the 
sum of $4,100.00 

C. Fire Department Regular and Substitute Account 
the sum of $38,900.00. 

D. Fire Department, Maintenance and equipment the 
sum of $600.00. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. 

Motion Carried 

Selectman Carson then moved to adjourn the Special 
Town Meeting Sine die at 8:10 PM. Motion Carried 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting reconvened at 
8:11 PM. 

Under Article 31 The moderator moved to waive the 
reading of the Legal description of the article. Motion 
Carried. 

Chairman of the Planning Board A. Robert Raab 
moved that the Town Meeting Body accept this article as 
it appears in the warrant. This recommendation is based 
on the Board's studies over the past year and on the 
public hearing held on April 13, 1978. 

Article 31 Chairman Raab moved that the Town vote 
to accept the provisions of Chapter 808 of the Acts of 
1975 as amended and to amend the Chelmsford Zoning 
By-Laws as follows to bring it into conformity with said 
Act: 

1. Add to Section 1 120. Authority the words "and under 
the authority of Article 89 of the Amendments to the 
Constitution, the 'Home Rule Amendment', and", so that 
Section 1120 will read as follows: "1120 Authority. This 
By-Law is adopted pursuant to and under the authority 
of Article 89 of the Amendments to the Constitution, the 
"Home Rule Amendment", and the provisions of Chapter 



40A of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Mass- 
achusetts, and amendments thereto, hereinafter referred 
to as the 'Zoning Act,'." 

2. Add to Section 1220. Compliance Certification and 
word "moved" so that Section 1220 will read as follows: 
"1220. Compliance Certification, Buildings, structures, 
or signs may not be erected, substantially altered, moved 
or changed in use and land may not be changed in prin- 
cipal use without certification by the Inspector of 
Buildings that such action is in cimpliance with then ap- 
plicable zoning, or without review by him regarding 
whether all necessary permits have been received from 
those governmental agencies from which approval is re- 
quired by federal, state, or local law. Issuance of a 
Building Permit or Certificate of Use and occupancy, 
where required under the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts State Building Code, may serve as such certification. 

3. Add to Section 1240. Penalty. The Words "any of the 
conditions under which a permit is issued, or any decision 
rendered by the Board of Appeals", so that Section 1240 
will read: "1240. Penalty. Any person violating any of the 
provisions of this By-Law, any of the conditions under 
which a permit is issued, or any decision rendered by the 
Board of Appeals shall be fined not more than $100 for 
each offense. Each day that such violation continues shall 
constitute a separate offense." 

4. In Subsection 1323(c) delete the word "administra- 
tion", substituting the word "administrative" in place 
thereof. 

5. In Section 1340. Repetitive Petitions, delete the word 
"exceptions ", substituting the words "Special Permits" in 
place thereof. 

6. Delete Section 2420. Extension or Alteration in its en- 
tirety, substituting the following in place thereof: "2420. 
Extension or Alteration. As provided in Section 6 of 
Chapter 40A, G.L., a nonconforming single or two- 
family dwelling may be altered or extended provided that 
doing so does not increase the non conforming nature of 
said structure, and other pre-existing nonconforming 
structures or uses may be extended, altered, or changed 
in use on Special Permits from the Board of Appeals if 
the Board of Appeals finds that such extension, altera- 
tion, or change will not be substantially more detrimental 
to the neighborhood than the existing nonconforming 
use." 

7. Delete Section 2530. Isolated Lots in its entirety, 
substituting the following in place thereof: 

"2530. Isolated Lots. Any increase in lot area, width, 
depth, frontage, yards, or coverage requirements of this 
By-Law shall not apply to erection, extension, alteration, 
or moving of a structure on a legally created lot not 
meeting current requirements provided that the appli- 
cant documents that 

(a) At the time such increase requirement became 
applicable to it, the lot: 

(1) had at least 5,000 square feet of lot area and 
50 feet of frontage on a street; and 

(2) was held in ownership separate from all other 
lots having frontage within 1,000 feet on the 
same street; and 



38 



(3) conformed to then existing dimensional re- 
quirements; and 

(b) the lot is to be used for single-family or non- 
residential use. 

Such nonconforming lots may be changed in size or shape 
or their land area rec^mbined without losing this exemp- 
tion, so long as the change does not increase the actual or 
potential number of building lots. 

8. Amend ARTICLE V. DEFINITIONS by inserting the 
following definition at is appropriate alphabetical loca- 
tion: "Lot area. The horizontal area of the lot exclusive of 
any area in a street or recorded way open to public use. 
At least 80% of the lot area rquired for zoning com- 
pliance shall be land other than that under any water 
body or bog, swamp, wet meadow, qt marsh, as defined 
in Sec. 40, Ch. 131, G.L. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 32 The moderator moved that the 
reading of the legal description be waived. Motion Car- 
ried. 

Based on its studies over the year and on its public 
hearing held on April 13, 1978, the Planning Board 
recommends adoption of Article 32 as it appears in the 
warrant. 

ARTICLE 32 Chairman Raab moved that the Town vote 
to amend the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law as follows: 

1. Amend Section 2300, Use Regulations Schedule by 
adding footnote 4 to read as follows: 

"4. Except "BA" if resulting in more than 10,000 sq. ft. 
gross floor area devoted to business uses on the premises." 

and by referencing footnote 4 to each "P" entry under 
Business Uses which is not already referenced "1". 

2. Amend Article IV. Special Regulations by adding Sec- 
tion 4500 Major Business Complexes, to read as follows: 

"4500 Major Business Complexes 

"4510 Applicability 

Any premises having more than 10,000 square feet gross 
floor area devoted to busines use shall be considered a 
Major Business Complex. Construction or change of use 
resulting in such a complex is allowable only if granted a 
Special Permit by the Board of Appeals in accordance 
with the following: 

"4520 Objectives 

The objectives for allowing Major Business Complexes 
are to increase the diversity and convenience of goods and 
services available in Chelmsford, to provide entrepre- 
neurial and employment opportunities for area residents, 
to focus development at locations able to support it with 
relatively small environmental or municipal cost, and to 
protect the town's natural environment, existing 
character and development, and ability to provide public 
services. 

"4530 Submittals 

Two copies of the following shall accompany as applica- 



tion for a Special Permit for a Major Business Complex or 
for rezoning to accomodate such a complex. One copy 
shall be transmitted to the Planning Board. For Special 
Permits, the Planning Board shall make recommenda- 
tions to the Board of Appeals regarding compliance with 
Section 4540 Decision Criteria. (The Planning Board 
shall neither sponsor nor favorably recommend any 
rezoning of three or more acres to a commercial district 
unless such materials have been submitted to is at a 
public hearing.) 

4531. A site plan, as specified at Section 1424. 

4532. Analysis of the consequences of the proposed 
development, evaluation the following impacts at a level 
of detail appropriate to the scale of development propos- 
ed, and using analysis materials provided by the Planning 
Board; 

Natural environment: groundwater and surface water 
quality, groundwater level, stream flows, erosion and 
siltation, vegetation removal (especially unusual species 
and mature trees), and wildlife habitats. 

Public Services: traffic safety and congestion, need for 
water system improvements, need for public sewerage. 

Economics: anticipated market area, complementarity 
with or duplication of existing services, amount and types 
of employment, labor force area. 

Visual environment: visibility of buildings and parking, 
visual consistency with existing development in the area. 

"4540 Decision Criteria 

A special permit for a Major Business Complex shall be 
approved only upon determination by the Board of Ap- 
peals that the requirement of Section 1520 Special Permit 
Criteria, Section 1425 Planning Board (Site Plan) Ap- 
proval, and the following have been met. 

4541 . The proposed plan is consistent with any submittals 
made under Section 4530 prior to rezoning, or in the 
event of inconsistency, satisfactory explanation has been 
made submitted showing why the departure is necessitat- 
ed by changed conditions or earlier error and that the 
departure does not reduce compliance with the objectives 
for the Major Business Complexes specified in Section 
4510. 

4542. The complex shall be so designed and located that 
annual average daily traffic is not increased 50% or more 
above current levels at any point more than 1,000 feet 
from an expressway interchange, with current levels be- 
ing as determined by the Chelmsford Planning Board; 
and shall be so located that resultant traffic is not above 
the capacity of roads and intersections at level of service 
"C" at any point within 1 mile of the premises, using 
definitions and methods of estimation as outlined by the 
Highway Research Board Highway Capacity Manual, 
1965 or later editions. 

4543. Site design and storm water facilities shall be so 
designed that in a 5 year storm the peak stormwater flows 
leaving the premises will not be increased more than 10% 
above current flows or cause design capacity of receiving 
structures or channel capacity by receiving streams to be 
exceeded." 



39 



The Finance Committee recommends the article. 
Motion carried, unanimously 

Under Article 33 Based on its studies over the past 
year and on its public hearing held April 13, 1978, the 
Planning Board recommends that the Zoning By-Law be 
amended as printed in the Planning Board report dated 
March 27, 1978. Chairman Raab moved that the Town 
vote to amend the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law by 
deleting Section 3300 Signs and Outdoor Lighting and 
the definitions of "Sign" and "Sign, Area of in Article V. 
Definitions, replacing them with new definitions and a 
new Section 3300; as provided in the Planning Board 
Report dated March 27, 1978 entitled "Signs and Out- 
door Lighting" as filed in the Office of the Town Clerk on 
which a public hearing was held at 8:00 P.M. April 13, 
1978 notice of which was advertised in the Chelmsford 
Newsweekly as required by law. 

A % vote is required by law. 

The motion carried, unanimously 

Article 33 in its entirety as voted is as follows: 

PLANNING BOARD REPORT 

March 27, 1978 

SIGNS AND OUTDOOR LIGHTING 

PROPOSED ZONING AMENDMENT 

1. Amend the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law Article V, 
Definitions, by adding the following at the end of 
the definition of "Sign" (thus adding these to the 
devices not considered to be signs): 

"g. devices identifying a building as distinct from 
or more of its occupants, such device being 
carved into or attached in such a way as to be 
an integral part of the building, not illuminat- 
ed separate from building illumination, with- 
out color contrasting with sign background, 
and not exceeding four square feet in area. 

h. address identification through numerals or 
letters not exceeding three inches in height." 

2. Amend the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law by deleting 
Section 3300 in its entirety, and substituting the 
following: 

"3300. Signs and Outdoor Lighting 

The following sign regulations are intended to serve these 
objectives: 

Facilitate efficient communication to ensure that 
people receive the messages they need or want, and 

Promote good relationships between signs and the 
visual qualities of their environs and the buildings 
to which they relate, and 

Maintain visual diversity within commercial areas 
by avoiding requirement of uniformity, and 

Support business vitality within nonresidential 
zones by accomplishing the above objectives 
without burdensome procedures and restrictions. 

3310. General Regulations. 



3311. Permits. No sign shall be erected, enlarged, 
or structurally altered without a sign permit 
issued by the Building Inspector, with the ex- 
ception of unlighted signs one square foot or 
smaller and temporary real estate signs. Per- 
mits shall only be issued for signs in confor- 
mance with this By-Law. Permit applications 
shall be accompanied by two prints of scale 
drawings of the sign, supporting structure, 
and location. A copy of any relevant Special 
Permit shall also accompany the application. 
All freestanding signs shall be registered and 
identified as required by Section 1407.0 of the 
State Building Code. 

3312. Maintenance. All signs shall be maintained in 
a safe and neat condition to the satisfaction of 
the Building Inspector and in accordance 
with Sections 1404.0 and 1405.0 of the State 
Building Code. 

3313.Nonconformancy. Any sign legally erected 
may be continued and maintained despite be- 
ing made nonconforming through change in 
the Zoning Bylaw, except that no off-premises 
signs (Section 3314f) may be maintained after 
June 1, 1980. Any sign rendered nonconform- 
ing through erection of additional signs on 
the premises or through change or termina- 
tion of activities on the premises shall be 
removed within thirty days on order of the 
Building Inspector. No existing sign shall be 
enlarged, reworded (unless equipped with 
moveable letters), redesigned, or altered in 
any way except in conformity with the provi- 
sions contained herein. Any sign which has 
been destroyed or damaged to the extent that 
the cost of repair or restoration will exceed 
one-third of the replacement value as of the 
date of the destruction shall not be repaired, 
rebuilt, restored, or altered unless in confor- 
mity with this Bylaw. 

3314. Prohibitions. 

(a) No moving, animated, revolving, moving 
light, or flashing sign or sign elements shall be 
permitted. No pennants, streamers, advertis- 
ing flags, spinners, or similar devices shall be 
permitted. 

(b) No sign shall be located within twenty-five 
feet of the intersection of sidelines of intersec- 
ting streets unless entirely less than 3 V2 feet or 
more than eight feet above grade. 

(c) No part of any sign shall be more than 
twenty feet in height above ground level or ex- 
ceed the height of the building to which it 
relates unless granted a Special Permit for an 
exception by the Board of Appeals. 

(d) Temporary Signs (including those 
mounted on wheels, trailers, or motor vehicles 
if those vehicles, trailers, or wheeled signs are 
regularly located for fixed display) are pro- 
hibited unless complying with all re- 
quirements of this Bylaw as applicable to per- 



40 



manent signs. 

(e) No part of any sign shall overhang a public 
way by more than twelve inches, except that 
on Special Permit from the Board of Appeals 
such overhang may be increased up to four 
feet. 

(f) No billboard or other sign shall be erected 
or maintained unless its subject matter relates 
exclusively to the premises on which it is 
located, or to products, accommodations, ser- 
vices, or activities on those premises. 

3320. Signs Permitted in Residential Districts. 

The following signs are permitted in Residential 
Districts RA, RB, RC, and RM. 

3221. One sign for each family residing on the 
premises indicating the owner or occupant or 
pertaining to a permitted accessory use, pro- 
vided that no such sign shall exceed one 
square foot in area. 

3322. One sign not over nine square feet in area per- 
taining to a permitted use or building other 
than dwellings or their accessory uses. 

3323. One temporary sign not over six square feet in 
area pertaining to the sale, rent, or lease of 
the premises provided that it shall be removed 
within seven days after sale, rent, or lease 
thereof. Such signs may be illuminated only if 
granted a Special Permit by the Board of Ap- 
peals upon its determination that such il- 
lumination serves public safety and conve- 
nience without damage to neighborhood 
character. 

3324.Unlighted directional signs not exceeding one 
square foot in area each and pertaining to 
permitted building, uses of the premises other 
than dwellings and their accessory uses, or 
prohibiting use of the premises or certain por- 
tions of it. 

3330. Signs Permitted in Business Districts. The 

following signs are permitted in Business Districts 
CA, CB, CC, and CD. 

3331. Attached Signs. 

(a) One sign attached to any one wall of a 
building, not to exceed an area equivalent to 
15 percent of the front wall area of said 
building, or sixty square feet, if smaller. 

(b) On Special Permit from the Board of Ap- 
peals the allowable sign area may be divided 
between two signs attached to different walls, 
and may be increased from 15 percent to 20 
percent of front wall area, or if smaller, 
eighty square feet plus a number of square 
feet equal to half the distance by which the 
sign setback exceeds the minimum front yard 
requirement: 



Allowable area = 80 + 



Actual Setback - yard require! . 



(c) In the case of buildings with multiple oc- 
cupants, each occupant is allowed one sign, 



with the above total allowable sign area divid- 
ed among them in proportion to their share of 
total floor area. 

(d) No attached sign shall extend above the 
wall to which it is attached. No sign shall be 
attached to a roof, real or simulated. 

3332. Freestanding Signs. One freestanding sign 
located within the front yard area of a 
building and not exceeding 15 percent of the 
front wall of the building, or 40 square feet, 
whichever is smaller, provided that the 
building has a minimum setback of 30 feet 
and the sign is so located as to be set back 15 
feet from the street line and 20 feet from any 
side lot line. On Special Permit from the 
Board of Appeals the allowable sign area may 
be increased to sixty square feet. 

3333. Directional Signs. Up to two directional signs 
per driveway, to contain no advertising. 

3334. Window Signs. One unlighted window sign 
for each window of the building not to exceed 
in area 20 percent of the area of any window 
upon which located. 

3335. Construction Signs. Temporary, freestanding 
signs may be erected on the premises to iden- 
tify any building under construction, its 
owner, architect, builder or others associated 
with it, provided that such sign shall not ex- 
ceed sixty square feet in area and shall not be 
erected to interfere with sight lines along the 
public way. Such sign shall be removed within 
seven days of the issuance of an occupancy 
permit. 

3336. Real Estate Signs. Temporary freestanding 
sign or sign attached to the front wall of the 
building and pertaining to the sale, rental, or 
lease of the premises. Such sign shall be 
removed within seven days of the sale, rental, 
or lease of said premises. 

3340. Signs Permitted in Industrial Districts. Any 

sign permitted in a Business District is permitted in 
an Industrial District (I A or IS) excepting window 
signs. However, a freestanding sign oriented 
parallel to the street line and not more than 30 
square feet in area need be set back only five feet 
from the street line. 

3350. Illumination. 

3351. Overspill. Illuminated signs, parking lot 
lighting, building floodlighting, or other ex- 
terior lighting shall be so designed and ar- 
ranged that their collective result does not 
create so much light overspill onto adjacent 
premises that it casts observable shadows, and 
so that it does not create glare from unshield- 
ed light sources. 

Unless all the following are met, it will be 
presumed that the above performance re- 
quirements are not satisfied: 

(a) Internally illuminated signs on the 
premises collectively total not more than 200 



41 



watts unless not exceeding 15,000 lumens. 

(b) Externally illuminated signs employ only 
shielded lights fixed within three feet of the 
surface they illuminate. 

(c) Exterior lighting fixtures other than signs 
are mounted not more than 15 feet high. 

(f) Building floodlighting totals not more 
than 2,000 watts unless not exceeding 50,000 
lumens. 

The Board of Appeals may grant a Special 
Permit for lighting which does not comply 
with these specifications if it determines that 
the performance standards of the first 
paragraph will still be met, and if the appli- 
cant documents that brightness of any sign or 
building element will not exceed 20 foot 
lamberts in Residence Districts or 50 foot 
lamberts in other districts. 

3352. Hours. No sign or building in any Residential 
District or within 300 feet of any Residential 
District if within sight from it shall be il- 
luminated between the hours of 11 p.m. and 
7 a.m. unless indicating an establishment 
open to the public during those hours. 

3353. Movement. No flashing, moving, or revolving 
lights shall be maintained. 

3360. Guidelines. The following are further means 
by which the objectives for signs stated at the begin- 
ning of Section 3300 can be served. These 
guidelines are not mandatory, but degree of com- 
pliance with them shall be considered by the Board 
of Appeals in acting upon Special Permits authoriz- 
ed under this Section, as shall consistency with the 
basic sign objectives and any specific criteria cited 
above. 

3361. Design. 

(a) Any increase above the basic maxima for 
the size and number of signs should be 
justifiable because of multiple frontages, 
development scale, or other special needs, 
and should be appropriate in relation to street 
width, signage on nearby structures, and 
speed of vehicular travel. 

(b) Sign content normally shouldn't occupy 
more than 40% of the sign background, 
whether a signboard or a building element. 

(c) Signs should be simple, neat, and avoid 
distracting elements, so that contents can be 
quickly and easily read. 

(d) Signs should be sized and located so as to 
not interrupt, obscure, or hide the continuity 
of columns, cornices, roof eaves, sill lines, or 
other elements of building structure, and 
where possible, should reflect and emphasize 
building structural form. 

(e) Sign materials, form, colors, and lettering 
shall be reflective of the character of the 
building to which the sign relates. 

(f) Clutter should be avoided by not using 



support brackets extending above the sign or 
guy wires and turnbuckles. 

3362. Content. 

(a) Signs should not display brand-names, 
symbols, or slogans of nationally-distributed 
products except in cases where the majority of 
the floor or lot area on the premises is devoted 
to manufacture, sale, or other processing of 
that specific product. 

(b) Premises chiefly identified by a product 
brand-name (such as a gasoline or auto 
brand) should devote some part of their per- 
mitted sign area to also displaying the identity 
of the local outlet. 

(c) Signs should not contain selling slogans, 
product descriptions, help wanted notices, or 
other advertising which is not an integral part 
of the name or other identification of the 
location or the enterprise. 

3370. Sign Advisory Committee 

3371. Membership. A Sign Advisory Committee of 
five members shall be appointed by the 
Selectmen for three year terms (except so ar- 
ranged initially that no more than two terms 
expire each year). Members shall include at 
least one retail merchant operating in 
Chelmsford, one registered Architect or 
Landscape Architect, and one other profes- 
sional in visual design. In addition, a member 
of the Board of Appeals shall be designated 
by that Board as a non-voting sixth member 
of the Sign Advisory Committee. 

3372. Procedure. All appeals to the Board of Ap- 
peals involving signs, applications for sign 
permits, and all applications for Special Per- 
mits authorized under Section 3300 shall be 
referred to the Sign Advisory Committee for 
its review and comment. No such appeal or 
application shall be acted upon prior to 
receipt of a report thereon from the Sign Ad- 
visory Committee unless no report is received 
within ten days from the date of referral of a 
sign permit application or thirty-five days 
from the date of referral of an appeal or 
Special Permit application. Any departure 
from the recommendations of the Sign Ad- 
visory Board in the decision shall be explained 
in a written report from the authorizing agent 
to the Sign Advisory Committee, Selectmen, 
and Planning Board." 

Under Article 34 The moderator moved to waive the 
reading of the legal description of the article. Motion car- 
ried 

Selectman William R. Murphy moved that the Twon 
vote to amend the Chelmsford Zoning By-Laws and Zon- 
ing Map to change from Single Residence District (RA) to 
General Commercial District (CD) the land situated on 
the easterly side of North Road in Chelmsford, Middlesex 
County, Massachusetts, and being shown on a plan of 
land entitled: "Plan of Land in Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts Owned by Theodore W. Emerson, 



42 



SOUTHERLY: 



WESTERLY: 



SOUTHERLY: 



Surveyed 22 November 1972. Richard G. McGlinchey" 
which plan is recorded with Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 115, Plan 157 (Sheet 1 of 
2) and bounded and described and follows: 

WESTERLY: by North Road, as shown on 

said plan, 230.46 feet; 

NORTHERLY: by land now or formerly of L. 

Rodger Currie and by land now 
or formerly of Theodore W. 
Emerson, a total of 400.00 feet; 

EASTERLY: by land now or formerly of 

Theodore W. Emerson as 
shown on. said plan, 401.04 
feet; 

NORTHEASTERLY: by land now or formerly of 
Penn Central Railroad; 

by land of the Town of 
Chelmsford, as shown on said 
plan, 261.48 feet; 

by land now or formerly of 
H.L. Davis, E.G. Krasnecki, 
and the Town of Chelmsford, 
as shown on said plan, 166.21 
feet; and 

by land of the Town of 
Chelmsford, as shown on said 
plan, 130.45 feet. 

Containing according to said plan, 139,888 square feet 
(3.211 Acres) more or less. Said land having been granted 
to the Town of Chelmsford by Bradford O. Emerson and 
Dorothy B. Emerson by deed dated January 2, 1976 and 
recorded in Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in 
Book 2179 at page 531. 

Selectman Lovering explained the article and how it 
also affects article 35. Mr. Rodger Currie explained his 
plans for the land. Chairman of the Planning Board A. 
Robert Raab gave the Planning Board's recommenda- 
tion: "Based on its review of the plans, and on its public 
hearing held April 12, 1978, the Planning Board recom- 
mends that article 34 be adopted. This recommendation 
is based upon the assurance that the Board of Selectmen 
will amend Article 36 to make the granting of the deed 
conditional upon the granting to the Town of a Preserva- 
tion Restriction under Sec. 31-33, Ch 184, G.L., or a 
comparable legal device, to assure that the development 
on the premises will conform to the plans submitted to 
the Planning Board at its public hearing of April 12, 
1978, and upon further assurance that such device will be 
prepared with the assistance of both the Historic District 
Commission and the Planning Board. 

The Finance Committee also recommends the article 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 35 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed that the Town vote to amend the Chelmsford Zoning 
By-Laws and Zoning Map to change from Single 
Residence District (RA) to General Commercial District 
(CD) the land in Chelmsford, County of Middlesex, Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts, situated on the Southerly 
side of Fletcher Street, bounded and described as follows: 



EASTERLY: 



SOUTHERLY: 



WESTERLY: 



The Moderator moved that the reading of the boun- 
daries be waived, motion carried. 

NORTHERLY: by land Southerly side of said 

Fletcher Street 110 feet, more 
or less; 

by land of Carragher et als 
166.11 feet, more or less; 

by land of the Town of 
Chelmsford 110 feet, more or 
less; and 

by land of Currie 166.11 feet, 
more or less. 

Being a portion of the premises described in a deed of 
Bradford O. Emerson et als dated March 31, 1977, and 
recorded with the Middlesex North District Registry of 
Deeds at Book 2237, Page 368. 

Being a portion of Parcel B on a land entitled "Plan of 
Land in Chelmsford, Massachusetts for Evergreen Con- 
dominium, Feb. 15, 1977, Robert M. Gill & Associates, 
Inc., Lowell, Mass." which plan is recorded with said 
Registry of Deeds at Plan Book 124, Plan 29. 

The Planning Board's recommendation on article 35: 
Based on its review of the plans, and on its public hearing 
held April 12, 1978, the Planning Board recommends 
that Article 35 be adopted. This recommendation is bas- 
ed upon the assurance that the Board of Selectmen will 
amend Article 36 to make the granting of the deed condi- 
tional upon the granting to the Town of a Preservation 
Restriction under Sec. 31-33, Ch 184 G.L. or a com- 
parable legal device, to assure that the development on 
the premises will conform to the plans submitted to the 
Planning Board at its public hearing of April 12, 1978, 
and upon further assurance that such device will be 
prepared with the assistance of both the Historic District 
Commission and the Planning Board. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 36 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen under 
the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 
40, Section 3 to grant by deed of the Boad of Selectmen to 
L. Rodger Currie and Patricia C. Currie the following 
described property, for consideration of $120,775.00. 
The moderator moved to waive the reading of the legal 
description. 

Motion Carried. 

The Land with the buildings thereon, situated on the 
Easterly side of North Road in Chelmsford, Middlesex 
County, Massachusetts and being shown on a plan of land 
entitled: "Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Massachusetts 
Owned by Theodore W. Emerson, Surveyed 22 
November 1972, Richard L. McGlinchey" which plan is 
recorded with Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds 
in Plan Book 115, Plan 157 (Sheet 1 of 2) and bounded 
and described as follows: 



WESTERLY: 



by North Road, as shown on 
said plan, 230.46 feet; 



43 



NORTHERLY: 



EASTERLY: 



NORTHEASTERLY: 



SOUTHERLY: 



WESTERLY: 



SOUTHERLY: 



by land now or formerly of L. 
Rodger Currie and by land now 
or formerly of Theodore W. 
Emerson, a total of 400.00 feet; 

by land now or for merly of 
Theodore W. Emerson as 
shown on said plan, 401.04 
feet; 

by land now or formerly of 
Penn Central Railroad; 

by land of the Town of 
Chelmsford, as shown on said 
plan, 261.48 feet; 

by land now or formerly of 
H.L. Davis E.G. Krasnecki, 
and the Town of Chelmsford, 
as shown on said plan, 166.21 
feet; and 

by land of the Town of 
Chelmsford, as shown on said 
plan, 130.45 feet. 

Containing, according to said plan, 139,888 square feet 
(3.211 Acres) more or less. 

Said land with the buildings thereon was granted to the 
Twon of Chelmsford by deed of Bradford O. Emerson 
and Dorothy B. Emerson dated January 2, 1978 and 
recorded in Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, 
Book 2179, at Page 531. The granting of this deed shall 
be conditional upon the granting to the Town of a Preser- 
vation Restriction under Sec. 31-33 inclusive, Ch. 184, 
G.L. or a comparable legal device, to assure that the 
development on the premises will generally conform to 
the plans submitted to the Planning Board at its public 
hearing of April 12, 1978, and upon further assurance 
that such device will be prepared with the assistance of 
both the Historic District Commission and the Planning 
Board. 

The Finance Committee and the Historic District Com- 
mission are both in favor of passage of the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 37 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed that the Town authorize the Selectmen to expend the 
sum of $120,775.00 from the proceeds received from Ar- 
ticle 36 to renovate the McFarlin School "A Building" on 
Billerica Road, for Municipal purposes. 

The Finance Committee is in favor of the article. 

Motion Carried. 

Under Article 38 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed that the Town vote to amend the present Zoning By- 
Law and Zoning Map be rezoning from Neighborhood 
Commercial District — CA to Roadside Commercial 
District — CB the following described land in 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts presently owned by Leonard 
S. Jennie E. MacElroy and Frederick A and Maybelle 
MacElroy: Parcel of Land in Chelmsford containing 5.3 
acres, more or less, situated on the Northerly side of Sum- 
mer Street bounded on the South by Summer Street 382 



feet; on the West by land now or formerly of Patterson, 
514 feet; on the North in part by Beaver Brook, 450 feet; 
and on the East by land now or formerly of said Patter- 
son, 556 feet, all said distance more or less. 

The Planning Board's recommendation: Based on its 
review of the plans and on its public hearing held on 
April 4, 1978, the Planning Board recommends against 
adoption of /Article 38. The Board is of the opinion that 
the material presented at the public hearing was insuffi- 
cient in substance and detail, and that the description of 
the land contained in the legal advertising of the hearing 
was incorrect. 

The Conservation Commission, Finance Committee and 
the Board of Selectman are all against the article. 

The following tellers were appointed: 

David McLachlan Ruth Delaney 

Richard Burtt Florence Gullion 

Julian Zaberiek Margaret Johnson 

Edward Hilliard Dorothy Lerer 

The moderator first asked for a showing of hands he 
felt that if there was definite %'s showing of hands then 
the tellers would take a count of those in favor. The 
moderator asked for a show of hands for the article, then 
of those against. The moderator declared the motion 
defeated. 

Under Article 39 The Moderator moved to waive the 
reading of the legal description of the article. 

Motion Carried. 

Paul Archer moved that the Town vote to amend the 
Chelmsford Zoning By-Laws and Zoning Map as follows: 
"The Zoning Map and Accompanying Ordinance passed 
as most recently amended entitled "Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Chelmsford" is hereby amended by establishing 
new lines and striking out the designation "RC" District, 
as shown on said zone map and substituting in place 
thereof new lines and designation "CA" District insofar as 
said zone map relates to the following described premises: 
The Land on the Southerly side of Billerica Road in said 
Chelmsford, being shown on "Land in Chelmsford, 
Mass., belonging to Eustace B. Fiske and Nancy M. 
Fiske, August 20, 1962, W.L. Flagg, C.E." which plan is 
recorded with Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds 
at Plan Book 98, Plan 58B, and bounded and described 
as follows: 

NORTHERLY: by Billerica Road, as shown on 

said plan, one hundred seven- 
teen (117) feet; 

by land of Fiske et ux, as shown 
on said plan, one hundred 
eighty (180) feet, more or less; 

by land of Fiske et ux, as shown 
on said plan, one hundred sixty 
(160) feet, more or less; 

by land of Thomas A. and 
Rachel L. Hamilton, as shown 
on said plan, one hundred 
eighty (180) feet, more or less; 

A discussion followed, Attorney Balas, representing Mr. 



NORTHWESTERLY : 



SOUTHWESTERLY : 



NORTHEASTERLY: 



44 



Archer explained why the article had come before the 
Town Meeting Body, Chairman of the Planning Board 
A. Robert Raab, gave the Board's recommendation: The 
Planning Board has reviewed the plans submitted to it, 
and has deliberated over the material presented at its 
public hearing held on April 4, 1978. The Board is 
deadlocked, three- to- three, with one absence, on whether 
or not to recommend adoption of Article 39. The Board 
recommends that the voters weigh the particular situa- 
tion of Mr. Archer against the issue of general com- 
pliance with the Zoning By-Laws of the Town, and cast 
their votes accordingly. 

The Board of Selectmen are against the article, as well as 
the Finance Committee. 

John Arenstam moved the question. A hand count was 
taken those in favor of stopping debate 397, those against 
5, Motion Carried. 

The vote taken on the article: Yes 337 No 114 The Mo- 
tion Carried. 

Howard Humphry made a motion to reconsider article 
39. A voice vote was taken. Motion defeated. 

Under Article 40 Ms. Roberta Livingston moved that 
the Town vote to amend the Chelmsford Zoning By-Laws 
and Zoning Map as follows: "The Zoning Map and ac- 
companying Ordinance passed and as most recently 
amended entitled "Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Chelmsford" is hereby amended by establishing new lines 
and striking out the designation "RA" District, as shown 
on said zone map and substituting in place thereof new 
lines and designation "RM" District insofar as said zone 
map relates to the following described premises: 

A certain parcel of land, located in 
Chelmsford, Middlesex County, 

Massachusetts, being shown on a plan of land 
entitles "Lorum Estates", subdivision plan of 
land in Chelmsford, Mass., Dana F. Perkins 
& Sons, In., Engineers and Surveyors, dated 
September 15, 1972, recorded with Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds in Book 115, 
Page 155, being bounded and described as 
follows: 

Beginning at the Southwesterly corner of said parcel, at a 
point on the Northeasterly line of Prescott Drive; thence 
Northeasterly by Lot A, as shown on said plan, 368.80 
feet to land now or formerly of Eastern Dry Wall Assc, 
Inc.; thence South 82° 36'36" East by land now or 
formerly of Eastern Dry Wall Assc, Inc. 415.39 feet to a 
bound as shown on said plan; thence South 57° 46'46" 
East by land now or formerly of Claude J. Harvey, as 
shown on said plan to land now or formerly of Charles F. 
and Joanne D. Philbrook, as shown on said plan; thence 
Southerly to a Massachusetts Highway bound, as shown 
on said plan; thence North 73° 16'30" West by the Nor- 
theasterly line of Route 3, as shown on said plan to a 
point on the Southwesterly line of Prescott Drive; said 
point being located where the course first above mention- 
ed, if extended in a straight line South 19° 29'8" West 
would intersect said Southwesterly line of said Prescott 
Drive; thence, North 19° 29'8" East 50 feet to the point of 
beginning. 



Said premises being a portion of Lot B, as shown on the 
plan, herein before mentioned. 

Chairman Raab, gave the Planning Board's review of 
the plans, and on its public hearing held on April 4, 
1978, the Planning Board recommends that Article 40 be 
adopted. This Article would cause an extension of an ex- 
isting RM (Multi-family Residential) zone, as originally 
intended by the Planning Board, and would have a 
negligible impact on the surrounding area. 

The moderator asked for a count of hands Yes 172 No 6 
Motion Carried 

Under Article 41 The Moderator read the motion. A 
little confusion took place on the wording of the article 
and the wording of the motion. As a result John Balco 
made a motion to table article 41 till the end of the 
meeting. Motion Carried. 

Under Article 43 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed that the Town vote to join the Lowell Regional 
Transportation Authority in conformity with and pur- 
suant to all of the applicable provisions of Chapter 1141 
of the Acts of 1973. 

A discussion followed. The Finance Committee was 
against the. article. Cristy Pettee moved to stop debate. 
Motion carried. A voice vote was taken on the article. 

Motion defeated. 

Under Article 46 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed that the Town vote to accept the following mentioned 
streets as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and shown 
by their reports and plans duly filed in the Office of the 
Town Clerk. 

Higate Road Extension 

Newtowne Way 

Industrial Avenue Extension 

Providing all Construction of same meets with the re- 
quirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to the 
withholding of any remaining bonds until such re- 
quirements have been met. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 47 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$5,000.00 to engage an outside professional consultant 
for the evaluation of all Town Insurance Policies. 

Henrick Johnson spoke against the article. The Board 
of Selectmen as well as the Finance Committee support 
the article. 

Motion carried 

Under Article 50 Selectman William R. Murphy mov- 
ed that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to convey to Raymond A. Robitaille and Doris I. 
Robitaille, husband and wife, both of Chelmsford, for a 
consideration to be determined, all right, title and in- 
terest, if any, held by the Town in the following parcel of 
land: Lots 62, 63, and 58, Block 21 Assessor's Map 64, 



45 



consisting of 5080 square feet of land, more or less, with 
the buildings thereon, if any located on Willis Drive, 
which was taken for non-payment of taxes from Work- 
ingmen's Home Realty Trust by instruments dated 
September 3, 1963 and recorded at Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds in Book 1620, Pages 134 and 
135. 

For title reference, see treasurer's Deed to the Town of 
Chelmsford dated June 10, 1975, and recorded at said 
Registry of Deeds in Book 2153, Page 303. 

The Selectmen and the Finance Committee both recom- 
mend the article. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 41 The Moderator removes this article 
from the table. 

Mr. Matthew Doyle moved to amend this article by ad- 
ding the following: In the first paragraph: Selectman 
William R. Murphy moved that the Town Meeting 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to form an Advisory 
Public Works Council whose function it shall be to review 
and actively pursue those activities and services and 
needs. ..Mr. Doyle's motion begin here. ..of existing 
Public Works Departments etc. 

Mr. Doyle moved to also amend the second paragraph: 
A person representing the public interest in water ser- 
vices, to be appointed by the Moderator.. Mr. Doyle's mo- 
tion begins here... and plus three citizens not members of 
Departments covered by D.P.W. study.. 

A voice vote on the motion to amend left the chair in 
doubt. The Moderator asked for a show of hands Motion 
Carried to amend. 

Article 41 now reads as amended: Selectman William 
R. Murphy moved that the Town Meeting authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to form an Advisory Public Works 
Council whose function it shall be to review and actively 
pursue those activities and services and needs of existing 
Public Works Departments commonky regarded as 
"public works" in nature and related matters on common 
interest to member agencies, make determination of what 
represents the Town's Total balanced interest and make 
advisory recommendations to the appropriate Town 
Agencies. The member representatives of the Council 
shall be: 

Chairman, Board of Selectmen 

Chairman, Park Commission 

Chairman, Recreation Commission 

Chairman, Conservation Commission 

Chairman, Planning Board 

Chairman, Board of Health 

Chairman, Sewer Commission 

Tree Warden 

Chairman, Sidewalk/Highway Advisory Committee 

A person representing the public interest in water ser- 
vice, to be appointed by the Moderator. And plus three 
citizens not members of Departments covered by the 
D.P.W. Study 

Each representative shall have the privilege of 
designating an appropriate alternate if necessary. The 



Council shall have a presiding officer elected annually by 
its member representatives, shall meet at least quarterly, 
and shall submit a report to the Annual Town Meeting. 
The Council will expire on June 30, 1981. 

Selectman Carson moved to disolve this Town Meeting at 
11:20 PM. 

Motion carried 



Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. 
Town Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



TOTAL R & A $22,069,461.37 

TOTAL TRANSFERS $643,112.00 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



TOTAL R & A $1,200.00 

TOTAL TRANSFERS $81,889.68 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 5-11-78 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

June 29, 1978 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 7:45 
PM by the Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin Jr., who 
recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 730 
voters present. Selectman Hart moved that the reading of 
the Constable's return of service and the posting of the 
warrant be waived. It was so voted. Selectman Murphy 
then moved that the reading of the entire warrant be 
waived. It was so voted. 

Under Article 1 Selectman William R. Murphy moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$18,471.00 for the purchase of one sidewalk snowplow 
tractor, such purchase to be made under the supervision 
of the Board of Selectmen. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 2 Selectman William R. Murphy moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$6,650. to incur the services of an appraiser to appraise 
all takings within the Proposed Middlesex County Layout 
of Graniteville Road. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 3 The Moderator moved to waive the 
reading of the nets and bounds of the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

John McCormack moved that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $8,750.00 and transfer the 
sum of $8,750.00 from the Conservation Trust Fund to 
acquire in fee simple in accordance with Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 132 A and Chapter 40, a certain 



46 



parcel of land located off Acton Road, Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts, said land being a portion of the premises 
described in a deed to CCC Realty Company, Inc. 
recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry of 
Deeds in Book 2175 Page 473, described as follows: A cer- 
tain parcel of land, with the buildings thereon, situated 
in said Chelmsford on the southeasterly side of Acton 
Road, being shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in 
Chelmsford, Mass., belonging to Ralph E. and Harriette 
F. House, February 21, 1968, Brooks, Jordan & Graves 
C.E's which plan is recorded with said Registry of Deeds, 
Plan Book 108, Plan 44, and bounded: 



NORTHWESTERLY : 
NORTHEASTERLY: 
NORTHEASTERLY: 
NORTHERLY: 
NORTHWESTERLY : 

NORTHWESTERLY : 

NORTHWESTERLY: 

NORTHERLY: 

NORTHEASTERLY: 



NORTHEASTERLY: 

SOUTHEASTERLY: 

SOUTHWESTERLY: 
WESTERLY: 

WESTERLY: 

SOUTHWESTERLY: 

SOUTHEASTERLY: 



by Acton Road, forty-one and 
3/100 (41.03) feet; 

ninety-four and 34/100 (94.34) 
feet; 

again, fifty and 97/100 (50.97) 
feet; 

twenty-one and 43/100 (21.43) 
feet; 

sixty-one and 92/100 (61.92) 
feet, said last four courses be- 
ing by land now or formerly of 
Matthew A. Sestito as shown on 
said plan; 

by last named land and by land 
now or formerly of Frank C. 
and Bessie Wiggin, as shown on 
said plan, three hundred forty- 
seven and 20/100 (347.20) feet; 

seventy-six and 63/100 (76.63) 
feet; 

fifty-four and 10/100 (54.10) 
feet; 

by two courses, fifty-seven and 
11/100 (57.11) feet and three 
hundred fifty-eight and 89/100 
(358.89) feet, respectively, said 
last four courses being by a 
stone wall by land now or 
formerly of Charles W. and 
Mary B. Alcorn, as shown on 
said plan: 

again by last named land, ten 
hundred fifty (1050) feet, more 
or less; 

by other land of the grantors, 
one hundred forty-five (145) 
feet; 

seventy-six (76) feet; 

one hundred fifty-seven (157) 
feet; 

again, one hundred fifty (150) 
feet; 

two hundred nineteen (219) 
feet; 

one hundred (100) feet; 



WESTERLY: 



SOUTHWESTERLY: 



SOUTHEASTERLY: again fifty (50) feet; 

SOUTHEASTERLY: again two hundred forty-five 
(245) feet, said last seven 
courses being by other land of 
the grantors, as shown on said 
plan; 

eight hundred sixty-seven (867) 
feet; and 

one hundred thirty (130) feet, 
said last two courses being by 
other land of said Ralph B. 
House and Harriette P. House. 

Containing according to said plan 15.8 acres. 

This land is to be held, managed and controlled by the 
Conservation Commission for the promotion and 
development of the natural resources and for the protec- 
tion of the watershed resources of said Town, and further 
for the pruposes of acquiring said land, that the Conser- 
vation Commission be authorized to enter into a contrac- 
tual self-help agreement with the Executive Office of En- 
vironmental Affairs. 

John Balco of the Conservation Commission, explained 
the meaning of the Article. The Finance Committee was 
in favor of the article. The moderator attempted to take a 
vote by voice, the following tellers were appointed: 



Ruth Delaney 
Dorothy Lerer 
Alfred Coburn 
Edward Hillaird 

Yes 478 No 32 Motion Carried. 



Margaret Johnson 

David McLachlan 

Richard Burtt 

Julian Zaberiek 



Under Article 4 John McCormack moved to withdraw 
the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 5 The Moderator moved to waive the 
reading of all the nets and bounds. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

John McCormack moved that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $25,000.00 and authorize the 
expenditure of $25,000.00 from the Conservation Trust 
Fund to acquire in fee simple, in accordance with 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 132 A and Chapter 
40, three certain parcels of land located off Summit 
Avenue and Byam Road, owned by Francis J. Donoghue 
and Helen R. Donoghue described as follows: 

PARCEL 1. The land described in a deed to Francis J. 
Donoghue and Helen R. Donoghue recorded in Mid- 
dlesex North District Registry of Deeds at Book 1344 
Page 493 as follows: the land in said Chelmsford, being 
lot number 2 as shown on a "Subdivision Plan of land in 
Chelmsford, Mass. belonging to Marie C. Warren, 
Surveyed January 1955 byJ.C. & W.T. Monahan, Civil 
Engineers and Surveyors" which plan is to be recorded in 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, and bounded 
as follows: 



SOUTHEASTERLY: 



by land of Francis J. and Helen 
R. Donoghue as shown on said 



47 



plan 457.64 feet; 

NORTHERLY: by land of Royce M. and 

Madge I.L. Parker and Hans 
H. Schliebus, as shown on said 
plan, 277.41 feet; 

NORTHWESTERLY: by lot number 1 as shown on 
said plan, 326.54 feet; 

WESTERLY: by Summit Avenue by a curved 

line as shown on said plan 36 
feet; and 

SOUTHWESTERLY: by other land of said Francis J. 
and Helen R. Donoghue, as 
shown on said plan, 266.56 
feet. 

Being all and the same premises conveyed to us by Marie 
C. Warren by deed dated February 14, 1955, and record- 
ed in said Registry, Book 1285, Page 42. 

There is excepted from this conveyance however so 
much of the premises hereinabove described as consists of 
a square fifty feet on each side shown on said plan which 
is supposed to belong to the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, and this conveyance is also made subject 
to any and all rights of way as shown on said plan. 

PARCEL 2. The land described in a deed to FrancisJ. 
Donoghue and Helen R. Donoghue recorded in the Mid- 
dlesex North District Registry of Deeds at Book 1142, 
Page 164 as follows: A certain parcel of land situated in 
said Chelmsford, bounded and described as follows: 
Beginning at the northwesterly corner of the granted 
premises at the corner of two walls at land now or former- 
ly of one Mansfield; thence S 89.5° E. Two hundred sixty 
and 7/10 (260.7) feet along a wall to a corner in the wall; 
thence N 82°24' E one hundred twenty and 7/10 (120.7) 
feet along said wall and land now or formerly of one 
Mansfield; thence still along said wall and Mansfield land 
N 79°32' E One hundred seventy one and 2/10 (171.2) 
feet; thence still along said wall and Mansfield land N 
85°53' E Three hundred sixty three and 3/10 (363.3) 
feet; thence still along said wall and Mansfield land N 
84°48' E One hundred eighty one (181) feet to another 
wall and land now or formerly of one Warren; thence 
southeasterly along said Warren land and last mentioned 
wall about Two hundred three (203) feet; thence 
southwesterly still along said Warren land and wall about 
One hundred twenty (120) feet; thence northwesterly still 
along said wall and Warren land Seventy one (71) feet; 
thence southwesterly still along said Warren land about 
Nine hundred fifty three (853) feet; thence southeasterly 
along land of one Hunter, now or formerly, and wall 
about Two hundred ninety four (294) feet to Locust 
Avenue; thence in a varying northwesterly direction 
along said Locust Avenue about Four hundred forty six 
(446) feet to the end of the wall; thence northeasterly in a 
straight line about Two hundred thirty seven (237) feet to 
the corner of a wall and fence; thence northeasterly along 
said wall about Five hundred seventy five (575) feet to 
another wall; thence along said named wall and land of 
one Armitage, now or formerly, about Four hundred 
thirty six (436) feet in a northwesterly direction; thence 
across Summit Avenue to the end of a wall and land now 
or formerly of said Mansfield; thence along said last men- 



tioned wall and Mansfield land about Three hundred 
three (303) feet to the point of beginning. 

Being the same premises shown on a plan recorded in said 
Registry of Deeds, Book 29, page 10, entitled "Plan of 
land in Chelmsford, surveyed for Frederick Bailey, 
January 1911, Smith and Brooks, Civil Engineers" con- 
taining fifteen and 583/1000 (15.583) acres. Excluding 
that parcel of said land conveyed by Adele Saunders to 
Hudson R. Warren and Marie C. Warren by deed dated 
May 29, 1947 and recorded in said Registry of Deeds in 
Book 1069 Page 141. 

PARCEL 3. A portion of the land described in a deed 
to FrancisJ. Donoghue and Helen R. Donoghue recorded 
in Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 
1277 Page 268 as follows: the land in Chelmsford situated 
North of but not adjacent to Locust Road, containing 
two and 81/100 Acres and bounded: Beginning at the 
Southwesterly corner of the premises at a Stone wall at 
land formerly of C.W. Byam and now of Frank J. 
Donoghue et ux: thence Northerly by said stone wall two 
hundred eighty-two and 87/100 feet to a drill hole in a 
stone wall at Summit Avenue shown on a plan hereinafter 
mentioned; thence Easterly by a stone wall by various 
courses by said Summit Avenue and by land formerly of 
one Simons and now supposed to belong to Marie C. 
Warren, four hundred thirty-eight and 38/100 feet, more 
or less, to a drill hole in another stone wall at land 
formerly of said Simons and now of Frank J. Donoghue et 
ux; thence Southerly along the wall by said Donoghue 
land three hundred sixty feet, to a drill hole in the wall, 
which point is distant Northerly from said Locust Road, 
four hundred four feet, more or less; thence Westerly by 
other land of said Ray D. Case et al, three hundred 
thirty-four and 63/100 feet to the point of beginning. 
The aforesaid premises are shown on a plan of land en- 
titled, "Plan of a Portion of Land in Chelmsford, Mass., 
belonging to Ray D. Case & George F. Hicks surveyed Oc- 
tober, 1954, byJ.C. & W.T. Monahan, Civil Engineers & 
Surveyors," which plan is to be recorded. 

Excluding that parcel of said land conveyed by Francis 
J. Donoghue and Helen R. Donoghue to Robert Hague 
by deed dated October 31, 1972 and recorded in said 
Registry of Deeds in Book 2738 Page 288. This land con- 
tains approximately 15.86 acres and is to be held, manag- 
ed and controlled by the Conservation Commission for 
the promotion and development of the natural resources 
and for the protection of the watershed resources of said 
Town, and further for the purpose of acquiring said 
land, that the Conservation Commission be authorized to 
enter into a contractural self-help agreement with the Ex- 
ecutive Office of Environmental Affairs. 

John Ba'co of the Conservation Commission explained 
the article. The Finance Committee is in favor of passage. 
A % vote is required. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 6 William R. Murphy moved that the 
Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to convey 
to Charles W. and Jean B. Rook, husband and wife, both 
of Chelmsford, for a consideration to be determined, all 
right, title and interest, if any, held by the Town in Lot 
numbered 27B Westford Street as shown on Chelmsford 



48 



Assessors' Plan 179 Block 42 containing approximately 
7500 square feet of land. Being the same premises con- 
veyed to the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
deed of Marguerite E. Perham and Robert S. Curtiss 
recorded in Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in 
Book 1853 Page 578^ 

A discussion followed. Selectman Lovering explained 
the meaning of the article. More discussion followed. The 
Finance Committee supports the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 7 William R. Murphy moved that the 
Town vote to accept Chapter 90, section 20C of the 
Massachusetts General Laws: Violation of Parking 
Regulations, etc., in Certain Cities-and Towns; Notice; 
Appearance; Schedule of Fines; Proceedings not 
Criminal. 

The Finance Committee supported the article. 

A voice vote MOTION DEFEATED. 

Selectman Murphy moved for reconsideration of the 
article. Stating that the article had the support of the 
Local Police and the Board of Selectmen. 

MOTION DEFEATED to reconsider by voice. 

Under Article 8 Selectman William R. Murphy moved 
that the Town vote to accept Chapter 60 Section 23A of 
the Massachusetts General Laws: Fees Charged for Fur- 
nishing Certificates of Liens. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 9 The Moderator moved to waive the 
reading of the article. Motion Carried, unanimously. 
Selectman Lovering explained the purpose of the article. 
The Finance Committee recommended the article. A 
voice vote was taken, MOTION DEFEATED. 

*see warrant for wording of the article, (Chap. 40 Sec. 
21D M.G.L.) 

Under Article 10 Selectman moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $11,879.00 to be 
transferred to the following accounts: 

Line Item 2. Accounting Department - Senior Clerks 
1771.00 

Line Item 15. Assessors' Dept. - Senior Clerk/Clerk 
1651.00 

Line Item 24 Building Inspector's Dept. - Senior 
Clerk 591.00 

Line Item 66 Fire Dept. - Officers and Administra- 
tion 591.00 

Line Item 138 Police Dept. - Officers and Administra- 
tion 1180.00 

Line Item 139 Police Dept. - Regular and Special 
487.00 

Line Item 149 Public Bldgs. Dept. - Janitor's Salary 
545.00 

Line Item 162 Registrars' Dept. - Clerk 591.00 

Line Item 212 Selectmen's Dept. - Part time 373.00 

Line Item 234 Town Clerk/Senior Clerk 591.00 

Line Item 235 Town Clerk's Dept. - Clerk - part time 



246.00 
Line Item 244 Treasurer & Collector's Dept. - Senior 

Clerk 2360.00 
Line Item 245 Treasurer & Collector's Dept. - Clerks, 

part time - 310.00 
Line Item 275 Veteran's Benefits Dept. - Clerical 

-591.00 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 11 Mary Ann Jones moved that the 
Town vote to direct the Board of Selectmen to request ap- 
proval from the State Reclamation Board and following 
such approval, if granted, to take such action as may be 
necessary for that Town to join the Central Massachusetts 
Mosquito Control Program. 

Mrs. Jones explained why she felt the town should re- 
join the program. A representative from the Central 
Massachusetts Mosquito Control Program gave a brief 
presentation on the Program itself. Much discussion 
followed Diane Lewis of the Environmental Advisory 
Council spoke on why the council was against the article. 
Mr. Maher moved the question to stop debate. Yes 482 
No 128 motion carried. A voice by vote left the chair in 
doubt. A hand count was taken. Yes 396 No 205 Motion 
carried. Mary Ann Jones made a motion to reconsider. 
Ina Greenblatt spoke in favor of reconsideration of the 
article stating that the Environmental Council wished to 
add a amendment to the article. A voice vote left the 
chair in doubt. Yes 158 no 437 Motion defeated to recon- 
sider. 

Under Article 12 Mr. Michael Stott moved that the 
Town vote to instruct the Board of Selectmen to initiate a 
program of aerial spraying to control mosquitoes. 

Mr. Scott explained why he was in favor of passage of 
the article. Paul McCarthy of the Board of Health said 
that the Board of Health would comply to the peoples 
wishes. The Finance Committee was against the article. A 
lengthy discussion followed, Frank McDonald moved the 
question to stop debate. A % vote is required a voice vote 
was taken motion carried, unanimously. A voice vote was 
taken on the article, Motion Carried. Mr. Marioles mov- 
ed for reconsideration on article 12, again a voice vote 
was taken MOTION DEFEATED to reconsideration. 

Under Article 13 Mr. Michael Stott moved that the 
Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Ten thou- 
sand ($10,000.00) Dollars to be expended by the Board of 
Health for the purpose of aerial spraying to control mos- 
quitoes. A discussion followed. Dennis Stott moved the 
question to stop debate. Motion carried, unanimously. A 
voice vote was taken on the article. Motion carried. 
Charles Reynolds moved for reconsideration of article 13. 
MOTION DEFEATED. 

Under Article 14 Mr. Alexander Wier III moved that 
the Town vote to approve the following resolution: 
"RESO L VED that the Board of Selectmen of the Town of 
Chelmsford be advised that the traffic problem in 
Chelmsford's Central Square needs to be solved without 
undue delay and that the Board of Selectmen be further 
advised to choose whatever method or practical solution 
including the use of traffic signals or traffic lights they 



. A. 

deem advisable to solve that problem." ,\ - lijL^^" 

A discussion followed. Mr. Edward "ttittaire made a 
motion to exclude the use of traffic signals or traffic 
lights. Motion made to stop debate by Kenneth Waters. 
Motion Carried, unanimously ^ ft x ^ M i 

A voice vote was taken on Mr. Hillairds' motion to 
amend MOTION DEFEATED. Ann LewHpoke against 
the use of traffic lights and offered the suggestion of 
pedestrian lights instead of traffic lights. A vote by voice 
was taken. Motion Carried. 

Selectman Lovering moves to adjourn the Special 
Town Meeting at 10:30 pm. sine die. MOTION CAR- 
RIED. 

Total R & A 80750.00 
Total Trans 33750.00 



49 



Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. 
Moderator 



Mary E. St. Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



land located off Acton Road owned now or formally by 
CCC Realty Company, Inc., described as follows: 

Plat Number 165 and Lot 53A as described in 
a plan entitled "Plan of land in Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts belonging to Ralph E. and 
Harriette F. House, February 21, 1968, 
Brooks, Jordan and Graves, C.E.'s" which 
plan is recorded with said Registry of Deeds, 
Plan Book 108, Plan 44. 

This land contains approximately 15.8 acres and is to be 
held, managed and controlled by the Conservation Com- 
mission for the promotion and development of the 
natural resources and for the protection of the watershed 
resources of said Town, and further for the purpose of ac- 
quiring said land, that the Conservation Commission be 
authorized to enter into a contractual self-help agree- 
ment with the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, 
and that the Town raise and appropriate a sum to be 
determined and authorize the expenditure to be deter- 
mined from the Conservation Fund; or act in relation 
thereto. 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



WARRANT FOR 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

June 29, 1978 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in the McCarthy Junior High 
School Auditorium on Thursday, the twenty-ninth day of 
June, 1978, at 7:30 PM o'clock in the evening, then and 
there to act upon the following articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purchase of one sidewalk snowplow 
tractor, such purchase to be made under the supervision 
of the Board of Selectmen; or act in relation thereto. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to incur the services of an appraiser to ap- 
praise all takings within the Proposed Middlesex County 
Layout of Graniteville Road; or act in relation thereto. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by fee simple or emi- 
nent domain, in accordance with Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 132 A and Chapter 40, a certain parcel of 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by fee simple or emi- 
nent domain, in accordance with Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 132A and Chapter 40, a certain parcel of 
land located off Acton Road owned now or formally by 
Robert E. Hague and described as follows: 

Plat Number 172 and Lots number 100 
and/or 104 as described in the deed dated 
January 27, 1975, Book 2139, Page 33. 

This land contains approximately 8.23 acres and 1.66 
acres, respectively, and is to be held, managed and con- 
trolled by the Conservation Commission for the promo- 
tion and development of the natural resources of said 
Town, and further for the purpose of acquiring said 
land, to authorize an expenditure not to exceed $15,000 
and to raise and appropriate 50% of the negotiated price 
and authorize the expenditure of 50% of the negotiated 
price from the Conservation Fund; or act in relation 
thereto. 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by fee simple or emi- 
nent domain, in accordance with Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 132 A and Chapter 40, a certain parcel of 
land located off Summit Avenue and Byam Road, owned 
now or formally by Francis J. and Helen R. Donoghue 
and described as follows: 

Plat Number 172 and Lot 99 described in the 
deed dated June 8, 1950, Book 1142, Page 
164. 

Plat Number 172 and Lot 99 A as described in 
the deed dated August 6, 1956, Book 1344, 
Page 493. 

Plat Number 173 and Lot 116A, as described 
in the deed dated December 2, 1954, Book 
1277, Page 268. 



50 



This land contains approximately 15.86 acres - Lot 99, 
11.73 acres; Lot 99A, 2.24 acres; and Lot 116A, 1.89 
acres - and is to be held, managed and controlled by the 
Conservation Commission for the promotion and 
development of the natural resources and for the protec- 
tion of the watershed resources of said Town, and further 
for the purpose of acquiring said land, that the Conserva- 
tion Commission be authorized to enter into a contrac- 
tual self-help agreement with the Executive Office of En- 
vironmental Affairs, and that the Town raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $25,000 and authorize the expen- 
diture of $25,000 from the Conservation Fund; or act in 
relation thereto. 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to convey to Charles W. and Jean 
B. Rook, husband and wife, both of Chelmsford, for a 
consideration to be determined, all right, title and in- 
terest, if any, held by the Town in Lot number 27B, 
Westford Street; or act in relation thereto. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to accept 
Chapter 90, Section 20C of the Massachusetts General 
Laws: Violation of Parking Regulations, etc., in Certain 
Cities and Towns; Notice; Appearance; Schedule of 
Fines; Proceedings not Criminal; or act in relation 
thereto. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to accept 
Chapter 60, Section 23A of the Massachusetts General 
Laws: Fees charged for Furnishing Certificates of Liens; 
or act in relation thereto. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
General By-Laws Article I General Provisions by adding 
the following section pursuant to Chapter 40 Section 21 D 
of the Massachusetts General Laws: 

Section 2 - Noncriminal Disposition of Violations of 
any Ordinance, By-Law or Regulation of any Municipal 
Officer, Board or Department. 

Any person taking cognizance of a violation of a 
specific ordinance, by-law, rule or regulation which he is 
empowered to enforce, hereinafter referred to as the en- 
forcing person, as an alternative to initiating criminal 
proceedings may pursuant to Chapter 40 Section 21D of 
Massachusetts General Laws, give the offender a written 
notice to appear before the clerk of the District Court of 
Lowell, or any other Court having jurisdiction thereof, at 
any time during the office hours, not later than twenty- 
one days after the date of such notice. Such notice shall 
be in triplicate and shall contain the name and address, if 
known, of the offender, the specific offense charged, and 
the time and place for his required appearance. Such 
notice shall be signed by the enforcing person, and shall 
be signed by the offender whenever practicable in 
acknowledgment that such notice has been received. 



The enforcing person shall, if possible, deliver to the 
offender a copy of said notice at the time and place of the 
violation. If it is not possible to deliver a copy of said 
notice to the offender at the time and place of the viola- 
tion, said copy shall be mailed or delivered by the enforc- 
ing person, or by his commanding officer or the head of 
his department or by any person authorized by such com- 
manding officer, department or head to the offender's 
last known address, within fifteen days after said viola- 
tion. Such notice as so mailed shall be deemed a sufficient 
notice, and a certificate of the person so mailing such 
notice that it has been mailed in accordance with this sec- 
tion shall be prima facie evidence thereof. 

At or before the completion of each tour of duty, or at 
the beginning of the first subsequent tour of duty, the en- 
forcing person shall give to his commanding officer or 
department head those copies of each notice of such 
violation he has taken cognizance of during such tour 
which have not already been delivered or mailed by him 
as aforesaid. Said commanding officer or department 
head shall retain and safely preserve one copy and shall, 
at a time not later than the next court day after such 
delivery or mailing, deliver the other copy to the clerk of 
the court before which the offender has been notified to 
appear. The clerk of the District Court shall maintain a 
separate docket of all such notices to appear. 

Any person notified to appear before the clerk of a 
district court as hereinbefore provided may so appear and 
confess the offense charged, either personally or through 
a duly authorized agent or by mailing to such clerk with 
the notice such specific sum of money not exceeding two 
hundred dollars as the town shall fix as penalty for viola- 
tion of the ordinance, by-law, rule or regulation. Such 
payment shall if mailed be made only by postal note, 
money order or check. The payment to the clerk of such 
sum shall operate as a final disposition of the case. An ap- 
pearance under this paragraph shall not be deemed to be 
a criminal proceeding. No person so notified to appear 
before the clerk of a district court shall be required to 
report to any probation officer, and no record of the case 
shall be entered in any probation records. If any person 
so notified to appear desires to contest the violation alleg- 
ed in the notice to appear, he may avail himself of the 
procedure established in Chapter 40 Section 2 ID; or act 
in relation thereto. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to be transferred to the following accounts: 

2. 

15. 

24. 

66. 

138. 

139. 

149. 

162. 

212. 

235. 

244. 

245. 



Accounting Department - Senior Clerks 
Assessors' Department - Senior Clerk/Clerk 
Building Inspector's Department - Senior Clerk 
Fire Department - Officers and Administration 
Police Department - Officers and Administration 
Police Department - Regular and Special 
Public Buildings Department - Janitor's Salary 
Registrars' Department - Clerk 
Selectmen's Department - Part-time Clerk 
Town Clerk's Department - Clerk, part-time 
Treasurer & Collector's Department - Senior Clerk 
Treasurer & Collector's Department - Clerks, 



51 



part-time 
275. Veterans' Benefits Department - Clerical 

or act in relation thereto. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to direct the 
Board of Selectmen to request approval from the State 
Reclamation Board and following such approval, if 
granted, to take such action as may be necessary for the 
Town to join the Central Massachusetts Mosquito Control 
Program; or act in relation thereto. 

PETITION 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the 
Board of Health to initiate a program of aerial spraying 
to control mosquitoes; or act in relation thereto. 

PETITION 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
Ten Thousand ($10,000.00) Dollars to be expended by 
the Board of Health for the purpose of aerial spraying to 
control mosquitoes; or act in relation thereto. 

PETITION 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to approve 
the following resolution: "RESOLVED that the Board of 
Selectmen of the Town of Chelmsford be advised that the 
traffic problem in Chelmsford's Central Square needs to 
be solved without undue delay and that the Board of 
Selectmen be further advised to choose whatever method 
or practical solution including the use of traffic signals or 
traffic lights they deem advisable to solve that problem." 

PETITION 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this 12th day of June, A.D., 
1978. 

S/William R. Murphy, Chairman 

S/Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr. 

S/John W. Carson 

S/ Arnold J. Lovering 

S/Paul C. Hart 

Chelmsford Board of Selectmen 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



JUNE 15, 1978 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: McFarlin School - All Purpose Room; North 
Elementary School Auditorium; Colonel Moses Parker 
Junior High School and Band Room; East Chelmsford 
School; Byam School Cafetorium; Westlands School 
Cafeteria; North Elementary School Auditorium; Small 
Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High School; 
South Row School Auditorium; South Row School 



Auditorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; Fire House 
-Old Westford Road, fourteen days at least before the 
time appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

A True Copy Attest: 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 

TOWN WARRANT 
FOR STATE PRIMARY 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby re- 
quired to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town 
who are qualified to vote in Primaries to vote at 

Precinct 1. McFarlin School-All Purpose Room 

Precinct 2. North Elementary School Auditorium 

Precinct 3. Junior High School (West) Band Room 

Precinct 4. East Chelmsford School 

Precinct 5. Byam School Cafetorium 

Precinct 6. Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 7. North Elementary School Auditorium 

Precinct 8. Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy 

Junior High School 

Precinct 9. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 10. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 1 1 . Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 12. Fire House - Old Westford Road 

On Tuesday, the 19th day of September, 1978 from 
8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the following purposes: 

To cast their votes in The State Primary for the 
nomination of candidates of political parties for the 
following offices: 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

GOVERNOR 

Lt. GOVERNOR 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

SECRETARY 

TREASURER 

AUDITOR 



for this Commonwealth 
for this Commonwealth 
for this Commonwealth 
for this Commonwealth 
for this Commonwealth 
for this Commonwealth 
for this Commonwealth 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

Fifth Congressional District 
COUNCILLOR Third Councillor District 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

Fifth Middlesex District 
REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Sixteenth Representative District 
DISTRICT ATTORNEY Northern District 

REGISTER OF PROBATE AND INSOLVENCY 

Middlesex County 
COUNTY COMMISSIONER Middlesex County 

COUNTY TREASURER Middlesex County 



52 



The polls will be open from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this 8th day of September, 
A.D. 1978. 

A true copy. ATTEST: 

Selectmen of Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

William R. Murphy 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr. 

John W. Carson 

Arnold J. Lovering 

Paul C. Hart 



Pursuant to the within warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: McFarlin School - All Purpose Room; North 
Elementary School Auditorium; Junior High School 
(West) Band Room; East Chelmsford School; Byam 
School Cafetorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; North 
Elementary School Auditorium; Small Gymnasium, C. 
Edith McCarthy Junior High School; South Row School 
Auditorium; Fire House - Old Westford Road; South 
Row School Auditorium; Westlands School Cafeteria, 
seven days at least before the time appointed for holding 
the meeting aforesaid. 



William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



A true copy, Attest: 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, SS. September 8, 1978 



William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



COUNCILLOR 3rd Dist 

Herbert L. Connolly 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 5th Mldx Dist 

Carol C. Amick 

Paula K. Lewellen 

Kenneth Douglas Freda 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 16 Mldx Dist. 

Bruce N. Freeman 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY Mldx Cty 

John J . Droney 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

REGISTRAR OF PROBATE & INSOLVENCY Mldx Cty 

Paul J. Cavanaugh 

Robert V. Campo 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER Mldx Cty 

John L. Danehy 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

COUNTY TREASURER Mldx Cty 

RoccoJ. AntonelH 

S. Lester Ralph 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



QUESTION 1 
Yes 



Blanks 
TOTAL 



Pet 1 


Pet 2 


Pet 3 


775 


602 


957 


3 





1 


318 


157 


398 


1096 


759 


1356 


645 


496 


865 


319 


184 


325 



Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet 11 Pet 12 Total 



509 
563 



405 
330 



294 
1133 



693 
314 



236 
879 



877 
362 



218 
1356 



524 1368 1133 



226 
1368 



210 
1386 



359 


201 


440 


127 


454 


340 


216 


1096 


759 


1356 


524 


1368 


1133 


831 


480 


442 


600 


295 


611 


559 


458 


456 


245 


571 


174 


583 


430 


292 



450 
1386 



643 
692 



524 1368 1133 



518 
565 



435 
369 



396 
413 



618 
746 



279 
879 



420 
363 



433 
415 



777 
327 



3401 
12292 

7517 
3267 
854 
2 
652 
12292 



742 1049 10349 



201 1928 
1251 12292 



322 


177 


392 


117 


406 


297 


176 


263 


221 


397 


259 


384 


3411 


1096 


759 


1356 


524 


1368 


1133 


831 


888 


821 


1386 


879 


1251 


12292 


614 


530 


763 


348 


748 


698 


524 


463 


508 


790 


512 


691 


7189 


270 


137 


338 


99 


371 


244 


195 


230 


181 


363 


224 


305 


2957 


1 











1 























2 


211 


92 


255 


77 


248 


191 


112 


195 


132 


233 


143 


255 


2144 


1096 


759 


1356 


524 


1368 


1133 


831 


888 


821 


1386 


879 


1251 


12292 



759 1356 524 1368 



449 3869 
1251 12292 



5827 
4912 



170 1548 
1251 12292 



5852 

6157 

283 

12292 



53 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

Kathleen Sullivan Alioto 

Paul Guzzi 

Elaine Noble 

Howard Phillips 

Paul E. Tsongas 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

GOVERNOR 
Michael S. Dukakis 
Barbara Ackermann 
Edward J. King 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

Thomas P. O'Neill III 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Francis X- Bellotti 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

SECRETARY 

Michael Joseph Connolly 

David E. Crosby 

John Fulham 

William James Calvin Jr 

James W. Hennigan Jr 

Lois G. Pines 

Anthony J. Vigliotti 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



DEMOCRATIC STATE PRIMARY 

September 19, 1978 

Pel 1 Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet 1 1 Pet 12 Total 



872 
4303 



953 
265 
218 

397 
308 



696 
4303 



Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet 11 Pet 12 Total 



TREASURER 
Robert O. Crane 
Lawrence E. Blaeke 
Paul R. Cacchiotti 
Latrence S. DiCara 
Thomas D. Lopes 
Dayce Philip Moore 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

AUDITOR 
Thaddeus Buczko 
Peter G. Meade 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 5th Dist. 

Ronald A. Burba 

Robert F. Hatem 

John F. Markey 

Michael E. McLaughlin 

Raymond F. Rourke 

James M. Shannon 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

COUNCILLOR 3rd Dist. 

Herbert L. Connolly 

Raymond P. McKeon 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



440 


4303 


216 


2242 


171 


1587 








53 


474 


440 


4303 



1069 
589 



1244 
566 



570 
3205 



528 
4303 



54 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 5th Mldsx Dist. 

Carol C. Amick 

Richard Robert Caplcs 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



307 


2934 


97 


1037 





5 


Sfi 


327 


440 


4303 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 16th Mdlsx Dist. 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

John J. Droney 

Guy A. Carbone 

L. Scott Harshbarger 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

REGISTRAR OF PROBATE & INSOLVENCY 

Paul J. Cavanaugh 

Edward J. Bishop Jr 

Francis C. Donahue 

Leonard F. Deacon Doyle 

John R. Harvey 

Ralph R. Hogan 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER 

John L. Danehy 

William C. Chisholmjr 

Michael T. Cunningham 

Bernard J. Hennessy 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

COUNTY TREASURER 
Rocco J. Antonelli 
James F. Brennan 
Thomas F. Coughlin 
Donald A. Fantini 
Charles A. Gallagher 
Richard D. Mahoney 
John J. Twomey 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 



Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet 11 Pet 12 Total 



352 436 4303 



440 


4303 


173 


1848 


49 


438 


163 


1568 





4 


55 


445 


440 


4303 


120 


1106 


54 


581 


17 


213 


31 


393 



895 
4303 



1006 
543 



926 
4303 



489 
269 
297 



749 
4303 



SENATOR IN CONGRCSS 

Edward W. Brooke 

Avi Nelson 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

GOVERNOR 
Francis W. Hatch Jr 
Edward F. King 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

William I. Cowin 

Peter McDowell 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 
William F. Weld 
All Others 



REPUBLICAN STATE PRIMARY 

September 19, 1978 



Pet 1 Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet 11 Pet 12 Total 



1076 
856 



1036 
624 



489 
2033 



55 



SECRETARY 
John W. Sears 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

TREASURER 
Lewis W. Crampton 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

AUDITOR 
William A. Casey 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 5th Dist 

John J. Buckley 

Nicholas D. Rizzo 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



451 
2033 



510 
2033 



523 
2033 



1075 
789 



Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet 11 Pet 12 Total 



COUNCILLOR 3rd Dist. 

No Candidate 

All Others 2 

Blanks 240 

TOTAL 242 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 5th Middlesex Dist. 

Paula K. Lewellen 178 

All Others 4 

Blanks 64 

TOTAL 242 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 16th Mdlsx 

Bruce N. Freeman 212 

All Others 

Blanks 30 

TOTAL 242 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY Northern District 

Guy Carbone (Write-in Candidate) 5 

All Others 4 

Blanks 233 

TOTAL 242 

REGISTRAR OF PROBATE & INSOLVENCY Mdlsx County 

Matthew Veneziano (Write-in Candidate) 6 

All Others 2 

Blanks 234 

TOTAL 242 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER Mdlsx County 

No Candidate 

All Others 7 

Blanks 235 

TOTAL 242 

COUNTY TREASURER 

No Candidate 

All Others 3 

Blanks 239 

TOTAL 242 



248 
249 



246 
249 



249 
249 



246 
249 



249 
249 



2014 
2033 



292 
2033 



2000 
2033 



2010 
2033 



2002 
2033 



2023 
2033 



No Candidates running in any office 
SENATOR IN CONGRESS 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

GOVERNOR 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



AMERICAN STATE PRIMARY 

September 19, 1978 

Pet 1 Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet 11 Pet 12 Total 

A A 

0000000000202 

A A 

0000000000202 



56 



LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

SECRETARY 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

TREASURER 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

AUDITOR 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

COUNCILLOR 3rd Dist. 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 5th Mldsx Dist. 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 16 Mldsx Dist. 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY Northern Dist 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

REGISTRAR OF PROBATE & INSOLVENCY Mdlsx Cty 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER Mldx Cty 
Blanks 



COUNTY TREASURER Mldx Cty 

Blanks 

TOTAL 











2 



0000000000 



000000000020 



000000000020 



0000000000 



0000000000 



000000000 



0000000000 



0000000000 



0000000000 







0000000000202 



57 



TOWN WARRANT FOR 
STATE ELECTION 

November 7, 1978 

THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To The Constable of the Town of Chelmsford or any 
other suitable person: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby re- 
quired to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town 
who are qualified to vote in elections to vote at the polling 
places, viz: 

Precinct 1 . McFarlin School - All purpose room 

Precinct 2. North Elementary School Auditorium 

Precinct 3. Colonel Moses Parker Junior High School 

Band Room 

Precinct 4. East Chelmsford School 

Precinct 5. Byam School Cafetorium 

Precinct 6. Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 7. North Elementary School Auditorium 

Precinct 8. Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy 

Junior High School 

Precinct 9. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 10. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 11. Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 12. Fire House - Old Westford Road 

On Tuesday, the 7th day of November, 1978, at 8:00 
a.m. to 8:00 p.m., for the following purposes: 

To cast their votes in the State Election for the Election 
of Candidates for the following offices: 

Senator in Congress for this Commonwealth 

Governor & Lieutenant 

Governor for this Commonwealth 

Attorney General for this Commonwealth 

Secretary for this Commonwealth 

Treasurer for this Commonwealth 

Auditor for this Commonwealth 

Representative 

in Congress for 5th Congressional District 

Councillor for 3rd Councillor District 

Senator in 

General Court . . .for 5th Middlesex Senatorial District 
Representative in General 

Court for 16th Middlesex Representative District 

District Attorney for Northern District 

Registrar of Probate 

& Insolvency for Middlesex County 

County Commissioner for Middlesex County 

County Treasurer for Middlesex County 

The polls will be open. from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 



Given under our hands this 30th day of October, A.D. , 
1978. 

S/William R. Murphy 

S/Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr. 

S/John W. Carson 

S/ Arnold J. Lovering 

S/Paul C. Hart 

Selectmen of Chelmsford 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
October 31, 1978 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: McFarlin School All Purpose Room; North 
Elementary School Auditorium; Colonel Moses Parker 
Junior High School Band Room; East Chelmsford School; 
Byam School Cafetorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; 
North Elementary School Auditorium; Small gym- 
nasium; C. Edith McCarthy Junior High School; South 
Row School Auditorium; South Row School Auditorium; 
Westlands School Cafeteria; Fire House - Old Westford 
Road, seven days at least before the time appointed for 
holding the meeting aforesaid. 

A true copy, Attest: 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

November 30, 1978 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order by the 
Moderator Daniel Coughlin, who recognized the presence 
of a quorum, at 7:50 PM. Selectman Murphy moved to 
waive the reading of the Constable's return of services of 
the posting of the warrant. Motion carried. Selectman 
Murphy moved to waive the reading of the entire war- 
rant. Motion carried. 

The Moderator then gave a brief review of the rules 
and regulations governing Town Meeting action. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Murphy moved that the 
Town vote to amend the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law and 
Zoning Map as follows: 

"The Zoning Map and accompanying Ordinance pass- 
ed and as most recently amended by establishing new 
lines and striking out the designation "RB" District as 
shown on said zone map and deleting the change adapted 
at the 1978 Annual Town Meeting and substituting in 
place thereof new lines and designation "RM" District for 
Town -houses type condominiums insofar as said zone 
map related to the following described premises: 



58 



A certain parcel of land, located in Chelmsford, 
Middlesex County, Massachusetts, being shown on 
a plan of land entitled "Lorum Estates" subdivi- 
sion plan of land in Chelmsford, Mass., Dana F. 
Perkins, & Sons, Inc., Engineers and Surveyors, 
dated September 15, 1972, recorded with Mid- 
dlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 
115, Page 155, being bounded and described as 
follows: 

Beginning at the southwesterly corner of said parcel at 
a point on the northeasterly line of Prescott Drive; 
thence, northeasterly by Lot A, as shown on said plan, 
368.8 feet ot land now or formerly of Eastern Dry Wall 
Assoc, Inc. thence south 82°36'36" east by land now or 
formerly of Eastern Dry Wall Assoc, Inc.; 415.39 feet to 
a bound as shown on said plan; thence south 57 °46'46" 
east by land now or formerly of Claude J. Harvey, as 
shown on said plan to land now or formerly of Charles F. 
and Joanne D. Philbrook, as shown on said plan; thence 
southerly to a Massachusetts Highway bounded, as shown 
on said plan; thence north 73°16'30" west by the north- 
easterly line of Route 3, as shown on said plan to a point 
on the southwesterly line of Prescott Drive; said point be- 
ing located where the course first above mentioned, if ex- 
tended in a straight line south 19°29'8" west would in- 
tersect said southwesterly line of said Prescott Drive; 
thence 19°29'8" east 50 feet to the point of beginning. 

Said premises being a portion of Lot B, as shown on the 
plan, hereinbefore mentioned. 

Attorney Howard Hall, representing Mr. Robert 
Hicks, owner of the above mentioned parcel of land, ex- 
plained the construction, and layout and reason for re- 
appearing before the Town Meeting body. 

Bernard Masters gave a brief explanation on why he 
was against passage of this article. Mr. Clarke and Ken 
Tarbox asked questions concerning the overhead layout 
and septic system, of the complex. 

The Moderator attempted to arrive at a unanimous 
vote, and failed, a hand count had to be taken. A % vote 
is required for passage, the following tellers were ap- 
pointed: 

David McLachlan Jane Drury 

Edward Marshall Dorothy Lerer 

Richard Burtt Connie Fabien 

Margaret Johnson Norman LaBreque 

The result was: 156 in favor, 31 against, motion passes 

Gene Roberts of 75 High Street questioned the 
quorum, Mr. Roberts decided to withdraw his motion. 
Edward Cady of Crockett Drive, then questioned the 
quorum. The tellers came forward and a head count was 
taken of the voters present. There were 227 voters, Town 
By-Law requires a quorum of 300 voters present. Select- 
man Murphy moved to adjourn the meeting till Wednes- 
day, December 6, 1978, 7:30 PM at the McCarthy Jr. 
High Gym. Motion Carried. Meeting adjourned at 8:30 
PM. 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

NOVEMBER 30, 1978 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in the McCarthy Junior High 
School Gymnasium on Thursday Evening, the thirtieth 
day of November, 1978, at 7:30 pm o'clock, then and 
there to act upon the following articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Chelmsford Zoning By-law and Zoning Map as follows: 

"The Zoning Map and accompanying Ordinance pass- 
ed and as most recently amended entitled "Zoning By- 
Law of the Town of Chelmsford" is hereby amended by 
establishing new lines and striking out the designation 
"RB" District as shown on said zone map and deleting the 
change adapted at the 1978 Annual Town Meeting and 
substituting in place thereof new lines and designation 
"RM" District for Townhouse type condominiums insofar 
as said zone map related to the following described 
premises: 

A certain parcel of land, located in Chelmsford, 
Middlesex County, Massachusetts, being shown on 
a plan of land entitled "Lorum Estates," subdivi- 
sion plan of land in Chelmsford, Mass., Dana F. 
Perkins & Sons, Inc., Engineers and Surveyors, 
dated September 15, 1972, recorded with Mid- 
dlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 
115, Page 155, being bounded and described as 
follows: 

Beginning at the southwesterly corner of said parcel, at 
a point on the northeasterly line of Prescott Drive; 
thence, northeasterly by Lot A, as shown on said plan, 
368.80 feet to land now or formerly of Eastern Dry Wall 
Assoc, Inc., thence south 82° 36' 36" east by land now or 
formerly of Eastern Dry Wall Assoc, Inc., 415.39 feet to 
a bound as shown on said plan; thence south 57° 46' 46" 
east by land now or formerly of Claude J. Harvey, as 
shown on said plan to land or formerly of Charles F. and 
Joanne D. Philbrook as shown on said plan; thence 
southerly to a Massachusetts Highway bound, as shown 
on said plan thence north 73° 16' 30" west by the nor- 
theasterly line of Route 3, as shown on said plan to a 
point on the southwesterly line of Prescott Drive; said 
point being located where the course first above mention- 
ed, if extended in a straight line south 19° 29' 8" west 
would intersect said southwesterly line of said Prescott 
Drive; thence north 19° 29' 8" east 50 feet to the point of 
beginning. 

Said premises being a portion of Lot B, as shown on the 
plan, hereinbefore mentioned; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
School Committee for the Town of Chelmsford to 
transfer to the Chelmsford Housing Authority, through 



59 



the Board of Selectmen, the McFarlin School — B 
Building and land therewith, for the purpose of 
rehabilitating said structure for elderly housing and said 
conveyance shall take place not later than June 30, 1979, 
or take any action in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to approve the 
following resolution: 

"RESOLVED that the Board of Health of the 
Town of Chelmsford be advised that the Town ap- 
proves of their current policy to refuse to issue new 
licenses to authorize the establishment of a business 
of massage." 

or act in relation thereto. Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the 
balance of $270,786.00 from "Loans Authorized" as ap- 
proved under Article 22 of the Annual Town Meeting 
held March 12, 1973. Said Article authorized borrowing 
of $950,000.00 for the reconstruction of Crystal Lake and 
only the sum of $679, 214.00 of required borrowing was 
necessary to complete this project, or act in realtion 
therto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote, pursuant to 
Section 9 of Chapter 258, Mass. G.L., as inserted by 
Chapter 512 of the Acts of 1978, to transfer from 
available funds a certain amount of money to effect in- 
surance providing indemnity for each officer and 
employee of the town, including the school department, 
from personal financial loss and expense, including legal 
fees, if any, in the amount of $1,000,000.00, arising out 
of any claim, action, award, compromise, settlement or 
judgement by reason of an intentional tort, or by reason 
of any act or omission which constitutes a violation of the 
civil rights of any person under federal or state law, if 
such employee or officer at the time of such intentional 
tort of such act or omission was acting within the scope of 
his official duties or employment, and provided that no 
such employee or officer shall be indemnified for viola- 
tion of any such civil rights if he acted in a grossly 
negligent, willful or malicious manner, or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Health to engage a professional engineer for the 
purpose of preparing a study and report on the feasibility 
of a septage disposal system for the Town of Chelmsford, 
said facility to be located at the Swain Road landfill, and 
to transfer from available funds the sum of Six Thousand 
Five Hundred Dollars ($6,500) for the preparation of the 
professional engineering study and report, and transfer 
from available funds the sum of Two Thousand Dollars 
($2,000) for the purpose of subsurface and geotechnical 
exploration and borings in connection with said study 
and report, with the total expenditure not to exceed a 
combined cost of Eight Thousand Five Hundred Dollars 
($8,500), and to determine whether the funds shall be 
raised by taxation, by appropriation or transfer from 
available funds in the Treasury, or by borrowing under 
the provisions of Chapter 44 of the General Laws of the 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, or to take any action 
related thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Health to engage a professional engineer for the 
purpose of preparation of construction plans and 
specifications for a septage disposal system at the Swain 
Road landfill, contingent upon the demonstration of the 
feasibility of system construction in the previously 
authorized report and study, and to transfer from 
available funds the sum of Six Thousand Dollars ($6,000) 
to be utilized by the Board of Health in having construc- 
tion plans and specifications prepared for said disposal 
system and to determine whether the funds shall be raised 
by taxation, by appropriation or transfer from available 
funds in the Treasury, or by borrowing under the provi- 
sions of Chapter 44 of the General Laws of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts, or to take any action 
related thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to transfer by a good and sufficient 
bill of sale, title to one (1) 1972 Chevrolet pickup truck 
with snow plow now being used by the Fire Department, 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from 
available funds a certain sum of money for the purchase 
of equipment for the Highway Department, such purpose 
to be made under the direction of the Board of Select- 
men, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to dispose 
of equipment presently being used by the Highway 
Department as follows: 

(a) To purchase one (1) truck chassis (for waste 
collections) for the Highway Department; 

(b) To purchase one (1) packer body (for waste 
collections) for the Highway Department; 

(c) To sell by good and sufficient bill of sale two 
(2) waste collection trucks used by the 
Highway Department in the recycling pro- 
gram; 

or act in relation thereto. Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
from available funds a certain sum of money to pay the 
teachers of the Chelmsford Public Schools, said amount 
to honor the balance of salaries due them for the 1977/78 
school year under the terms of the Agreement nogotiated 
by them with the School Committee for the 1977 to 1980 
school years and signed October 25, 1978, or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 1 1 . To see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
and transfer a certain sum of money from Antirecession 
Fiscal Assistance funds to various accounts for the 
maintenance of basic services, or act in relation thereto. 

Board oF Selectmen 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Personnel, Wage and Salary Administration By-law Sec- 



60 



don 4 Subsection (c) by adding the following sentence 
after the first sentence of the second paragraph: 

"The appointing authority shall select the step of 
the salary scale at which the employee shall com- 
mence employment within the salary range 
established for each position." 



or act in relation thereto 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to approve the 
filing of a petition in the General Court under the provi- 
sions of Section 8 of Article 89 of the Amendments to the 
Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for 
a special act: "Enabling the Town of Chelmsford to pay 
the sum of $5,495.98 to Highway Department 
employees for overtime worked during the fiscal years 
1976, 1977, ard 1978," or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to convey to Thomas O'Brien all 
right, title and interest, if any, held by the Town in a por- 
tion of a public way known as Green Way, for considera- 
tion to be determined or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this 13th day of November 
A.D., 1978. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, SS. November 16, 1979 

Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 



warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: McFarlin School — All Purpose Room: North 
Elementary School Auditorium; Colonel Moses Parker 
Junior High School Band Room; East Chelmsford 
School; Byam School Cafetorium; Westlands School 
Cafeteria; North Elementary School Auditorium; Small 
Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High School; 
South Row School Auditorium; South Row School 
Auditorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; Fire House — 
Old Westford Road, fourteen days at least before the 
time appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 



ADJOURNED 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

December 6, 1978 

The Adjourned Special Town Meeting was called to 
order at 7:45 PM, by the Moderator Daniel Coughlin, 
who recognized the presence of a quorum. Bernard 
Masters of Hornbeam Hill Road, questioned the quorum. 
The following tellers were appointed to take a head count 
of the voters present. 



Carolyn Bennett 
Richard Burtt 
David McLachlan 



Margaret Johnson 

Dorothy Lerer 

Edward Marshall 



The result of the count was 245 voters present. Town 
By-Law requires 300 voters for a Special Town Meeting. 
The moderator therefore declared the Special Town 
Meeting of December 6th, 1978 adjourned sine die. 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

Edward W. Brooke 

Paul E. Tsongas 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

GOVERNOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

Hatch & Cowin 

King & O'Neill 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Francis X. Bellotti 

William F. Weld 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

SECRETARY 

Michael Joseph Connolly 

John W. Sears 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

TREASURER 
Robert Q_. Crane 
Lewis S. W. Crampton 
All Others 



STATE ELECTION 

November 7, 1978 



Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet 11 Pet 12 Totan 



233 
515 



550 
796 



429 
686 



289 
528 



279 
530 



495 
860 



342 
527 



457 
273 



666 
626 



524 1368 1133 



623 
676 



488 
308 



383 

453 



719 
598 



434 
416 



479 
757 



4635 
7463 



1096 


759 


1356 


524 


1368 


1133 


831 


888 


821 


1386 


879 


1251 


12292 


559 


223 


547 


162 


634 


461 


303 


443 


327 


612 


361 


574 


5206 


510 


515 


744 


348 


690 


626 


507 


412 


458 


717 


486 


625 


6638 


6 


9 


31 


2 


17 


18 


7 


12 


24 


15 


10 


22 


173 


21 


12 


34 


12 


27 


28 


14 


21 


12 


42 


22 


30 


275 


1096 


759 


1356 


524 


1368 


1133 


831 


888 


821 


1386 


879 


1251 


12292 


765 


585 


992 


423 


982 


857 


637 


598 


655 


1034 


631 


908 


9067 


308 


162 


328 


88 


356 


259 


176 


275 


145 


325 


234 


318 


2974 


1 











1 























2 


22 


12 


36 


13 


29 


17 


18 


15 


21 


27 


14 


25 


249 


1096 


759 


1356 


524 


1368 


1133 


831 


888 


821 


1386 


879 


1251 


12292 


476 


492 


685 


347 


657 


606 


494 


378 


468 


673 


468 


579 


6323 


546 


230 


586 


143 


636 


463 


291 


458 


307 


631 


374 


583 


5248 

















1 











1 





1 


3 


74 


37 


83 


34 


75 


63 


46 


52 


46 


81 


37 


88 


718 



879 1251 12292 



6206 
5465 



61 



Blanks 
TOTAL 

AUDITOR 
Thaddeus Buczko 
Timothy F. O'Brien 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 5th Dist 

John J. Buckley 

James M. Shannon 

James J. Gaffney III 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



QUESTION 2 
Yes 



Blanks 
TOTAL 

QUESTION 3 



Blanks 
TOTAL 

QUESTION 4 



Blanks 
TOTAL 

QUESTION 5 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

QUESTION 6 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

QUESTION 7 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

QUESTION 8 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



689 
299 



104 
1096 



684 
306 



426 
522 



663 
334 



524 1368 1133 



476 
526 
318 



499 
540 
294 



460 
310 



445 
377 



296 
212 



512 
255 



232 
373 



765 
524 



423 
607 



497 
336 



252 
355 
253 



81 620 

1251 12292 



663 
484 



448 
514 
253 



. 827 
12292 



5144 
2955 



1096 759 1356 524 1368 1133 831 888 821 1386 879 1251 12292 
Pet 1 Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet 11 Pet 12 Total 



205 
1096 



933 
335 



572 
243 



556 
225 



524 1368 1133 



853 8034 

330 3217 

68 1041 

1251 12292 



895 
380 



704 
299 



570 
240 



930 
390 



525 
252 



3532 



7937 
3372 
61 983 
1251 12292 



462 
203 



465 
256 



529 
270 



543 
207 



330 



1368 1133 



230 


570 


500 


325 


358 


204 


634 


448 


385 


423 



524 1368 1133 



922 
362 



547 
214 



556 
216 



356 
377 



569 
216 



729 
526 



606 
399 



739 
555 



524 1368 1133 



7654 
3455 
80 1183 
1251 12292 



543 5129 

604 5627 

104 1536 

1251 12292 

814 8030 

387 3345 

50 917 

1251 12292 

688 6502 

498 4688 

65 1102 

1251 12292 



478 949 

135 206 

146 209 

759 1356 



919 
252 



200 
225 
1133 



875 
212 



8158 
2137 
164 1997 
1251 12292 



62 




SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



William K. Sharpley, Jr., Vice-Chairman 
John W. Peters, Secretary 



Myra J. Silver, Chairman 



Cynthia L. Teele, Student Member 
Thomas L. Rivard, Superintendent 

THE ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1978 



Stan Norkunas 
CarolC. Cleven 



Years 

1973 
1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978-79 



Teachers 

512 
548 
553 
565 
550 
539 



-Teachers 1 


Budget 2 


Expenditures 


Enrollment 


296 


14, 767, 112. 3 


14,328,428. 


9,059 


324 


10,660.533. 


10,532,793. 


9,627 


331 


11,719,467. 


11,719.112. 


9,555 


336 


12,348,725. 


12,337,877. 


9,311 


298 


13,024,958. 


13,008,530. 


8,936 


273 


13,608,419. 




8,395 



'Includes Part Time Personnel 

includes Federal Funds 

3 Eighteen Month Budget (1/1/73-6/30/74) 

4 Not Finalized until 6/30/79 



Each year begins with its own sense of promise, pro- 
blems and hope. 1978 was no exception. Declining enroll- 
ment, staffing, evaluation, curriculum, collective 
bargaining, and inflation were all part of the challenge 
which the School Department tackled with vigor and pur- 
pose. 

Declining enrollments continue to be a major issue in 
the Chelmsford Public Schools. Kindergarten through 
sixth grade enrollments stood at 4,046 on October 1, 
1978 — a decline of 390 from the previous year, and a 



decline of 1,222 from the 1974 high of 5,268. The birth 
rate to Chelmsford residents has fallen more than 50.4% 
in the past nine years and in-migration and housing 
development have slowed considerably. 

The enrollment projections, which are calculated using 
the latest birth and enrollment figures in a formula con- 
sistently applied since 1970, proved once again to meet 
the actual school enrollment. The summary of these pro- 
jections follows: 



63 



Grade 

K 

1-6 

7-9 

10-12 

Sp. Class 

TOTAL 



Projected 

1978 

404 

3691 

2186 

2077 

65 



8423 



79 



New Projections for 1979-83 

80 81 82 



83 



365 


362 


342 


313 


300 


3394 


3119 


2783 


2495 


2311 


2044 


1908 


1875 


1820 


1732 


2087 


2030 


1936 


1809 


1692 


65 


65 


65 


65 


65 


7955 


7484 


7001 


6502 


6100 



Chelmsford's official enrollment of 8,395 students for 
the school year 1978-79 represents a decline of 541 
students or 6.4% from the 8,936 enrolled in 1977-78. 



The specific enrollment details for all schools by grade 
level is depicted below: 



STUDENT ENROLLMENT 



Gr. 3 Gr. 4 



Byam 


73 


78 


87 


102 


118 


109 


119 


Center 


43 


63 


69 


93 


97 


92 


105 


Harrington 


52 


85 


97 


103 


123 


101 


127 


Highland 












105 




North 


95 


101 


116 


124 


135 






South Row 


47 


45 


78 


86 


102 


84 


84 


Westlands 


81 


116 


133 


120 


116 


120 


103 


McCarthy 
















Parker 














119 


High 
















TOTALS 


391 


488 


580 


628 


691 


611 


657 



Jr. 8 


Gr. 9 


G 


r. 10 


G 


r. 11 


G 


r. 12 


Sp. Ed. 

12 

26 
14 


Total 

686 
574 
688 
105 
571 
552 
803 


410 


378 
















1172 


329 


338 














18 


1132 








725 




722 




663 


PG 2 


2112 


739 


716 




725 




722 




663 


72 


8395 



Dealing with declining enrollments presents many pro- 
blems along with many opportunities and requires even 
greater managerial skills and comprehensive planning by 
the School Department. 

In January of this year, the School Committee received 
its first report from the Ad Hoc Committee on Declining 
Enrollment which had been formed by the School Com- 
mittee in the fall of 1977 to study declining enrollments 
and related issues. The final report from this committee 
is due in February 1979, and will provide the basis of 
long-range planning to accommodate a thoughtful and 
rational approach to dealing with declining enrollments. 
Some of the issues that have already surfaced and are be- 
ing addressed because of declining enrollments are: 
reduction in teaching and support staff, class size and sec- 
tions per grade, utilization of buildings, cost-effective use 
of school buildings, and the number of elective courses 
available to secondary students. 

On September 5, 1978, the School Committee voted to 
return the McFarlin School "B" Building, which became 
vacant this past June, to the Board of Selectmen for use 
by the Chelmsford Housing Authority. 

Two years of negotiations with first the Chelmsford 
Teachers' Association, and then the Chelmsford Federa- 
tion of Teachers ended on October 25, 1978, after a short 
acrimonious strike, with an agreement on a three year 
contract retroactive in salaries to July 1, 1977. The salary 
increase was set at 4.8% plus step increase for teachers on 
Step 1-10 of the salary schedule and 6% for teachers on 
Setp 11 (top step) for 1977-78; the identical percentage 
increases were granted for the current school year, 
1978-89; and a 6% plus step increase for teachers on Step 
1-10 of the salary schedule and 6% for teachers on Step 
11 (top step) for 1979-80. The teachers were on strike for 



two days. A major issue in the negotiations was reduction 
in force (RIF) procedures applicable to tenured teachers 
in view of declining enrollments. 

Over the past several years the new problems, ideas and 
concerns which developed have led to an increased 
awareness in the community and within the school staff 
for an even greater need to work together to achieve the 
goals of the school system. 

In order to establish a closer relationship among ad- 
ministrators, teachers, students and parents, a House 
Plan was successfully implemented at the McCarthy 
Junior High School in September. The new policies in- 
stituted to assist the students in assuming their respon- 
sibilities have been very effective. 

The School Committee continues to work with the 
school administration, faculty and community on policy 
matters, especially as they relate to instructional pro- 
grams. The improvements in the instructional programs 
can be attributed to the school system's efforts over the 
past few years to organize the curriculum more effective- 
ly, to analyze individual student's needs and learning 
styles, to utilize instructional materials appropriately and 
to work in closer understanding and cooperation with 
parents. Goals and priorities, together with evaluation 
procedures, are being clarified or developed for every 
subject area. A manual for the improvement and evalua- 
tion of administrators is being developed, and work is be- 
ing done to improve the evaluation procedures for other 
members of the school staff. 

As has been stated in earlier reports, planning teaching 
strategies and materials to permit students to progress ac- 
cording to their needs requires a dedicated commitment 
of effort and time from all. The following excerpts which 
are taken from reports written by school personnel will 



64 



help readers of this report to understand better some of 
the learning experiences their children are having in our 
schools today. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF 
LANGUAGE ARTS 

Curriculum development in language arts is a process 
of articulating the nature and scope of the program and 
of providing appropriate materials and assessment in- 
struments for achieving and measuring success. Accor- 
dingly, guides and programs are continuously developed 
to meet the needs of students at all levels from 
kindergarten to grade 12. 

At the elementary level, The Language Arts Com- 
petencies Guide for Mechanical Skills in Writing, 
developed in a summer workshop by Chelmsford 
teachers, provides the structure and direction for 
teaching grammar, punctuation, and capitalization in 
grades K-6. This guide consists of a Skills Development 
Chart which provides by grade level the specific objectives 
for students in mechanical skills, the materials available 
for achieving the objectives, and a pretest for each of the 
objectives listed. An annotated list of all language arts 
materials available at the elementary level and a Profile 
Sheet for charting the individual progress of students are 
also included and can be used at the discretion of the 
teacher. 

The Merrill Spelling Program adopted last year at the 
elementary level continues to prove successful. This pro- 
gram is based on the following two ideas: 

1. Students learn to spell most efficiently by taking 
pretests and then studying the words they misspell- 
ed. 

2. Students must use the words they have learned to 
spell in meaningful activities. 

The second feature of the program is really the more 
attractive and important. The truth of the matter is that 
regardless of how well students learn to spell the words in 
their spelling lists, they must use these words in their 
writing. Students learn to write and to spell by writing, 
and this particular program is predicated on continuous 
writing assignments in each unit. 

This year, the Merrill Spelling Program is in the pro- 
cess of being extended to grades 7 and 8. To facilitate the 
implementation of this program, several workshops in 
spelling are planned for junior high school teachers. In 
addition to this formal spelling program, spelling lists 
generated from students' compositions are and will con- 
tinue to be part of teaching spelling in the junior high 
schools. 

The writing program at the junior high schools in- 
cludes using diagnostic and mastery tests in mechanical 
skills at each grade level and monitoring a student's pro- 
gress in writing by keeping writing folders for each stu- 
dent in grades 7 through 9. In addition to writing 
samples, forms listing the books students have read for 
class and for outside reading are included in these 
folders. The forms were developed by the junior high 
school English department. 

The English program at the high school continues to 



provide a reasonable balance between elective and re- 
quired courses. The elective program does not apply to 
the sophomore year where students must take one of three 
levels of English which run parallel to the three levels of 
English at the junior high schools. It is not until the 
junior year that students can choose between year-long 
curriculum level courses or semester-long elective courses. 
Seniors have the greatest amount of flexibility in the elec- 
tive program, but even here departmental guidelines in- 
sure an appropriate balance of the skills being taught: no 
more than one of the courses elected can be from any one 
of three of the following categories — reading, writing, or 
performance. 

Elective courses provide for interests and needs beyond 
those offered in the regular program. Two new elec- 
tives — Science Fiction and Periodical Literature — meet 
these criteria. The interest in science fiction is largely 
related to the recent success and popularity of films like 
Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind. 
Periodical Literature, on the other hand, provides 
students who need help in reading with the opportunity 
to improve their basic skills by reading and discussing 
newspapers and magazines. 

A new Honors program in English is for the first time 
being offered this year at the high school. Twenty-five 
students were selected from the entire sophomore class to 
participate in the junior Honors program which will lead 
to Advanced Placement in the senior year. Advanced 
Placement refers specifically to the senior year where a 
student following a course consistent with the College En- 
trance Examination Board Advanced Placement Pro- 
gram does work which is the equivalent to college 
freshmen English. The Honors program will be offered in 
grade 10 in September, 1979. 

One of the major system-wide concerns in curriculum 
for the next two or three years is to meet the guidelines for 
minimum standards in English mandated by the State 
Department of Education. Although not all of the 
ramifications of competency testing in Massachusetts are 
known, it is clear that local school districts will play a ma- 
jor role in developing the details of their own basic skills 
competency assessment. This means that subject to state 
approval local school districts will determine the perfor- 
mance standards and learning objectives to be achieved 
in reading, writing, listening, and speaking and will 
develop their own instruments for measuring the progress 
made in these areas. 

Composition: KT2, a guide developed during a six-day 
workshop this past summer, provides the first component 
of a minimum competency program in writing statements 
of specific skills by grade level that students should 
master. As part of the process of implementing this 
writing program, workshops and meetings are and will 
continue to be held throughout the year. To facilitate the 
effectiveness of these meetings and to meet the state's 
guidelines for monitoring the progress of each student in 
basic skills, all teachers in grades 3-12 are following these 
procedures: 

1 . Keeping a writing folder for each student which will 
be passed on to his/her next year's teacher. 

2. Including in the writing folder — 

A. one paper each marking term, including 



65 



drafts and final copies illustrating stated 
paragraph objectives 
B. a Profile Sheet for each student. 

Incidently, this guide is available not only to teachers 
but also upon request to parents. Each page is in 
language that is understandable to the layman, enabling 
parents to understand more about the expectations of 
Chelmsford's writing program and of how they can assist 
in the development and growth of their child's writing. 

The writing program, however, is only a start; there is 
still much to do: sharing concerns about strategies and 
approaches for correcting compositions, working with 
other departments to reinforce one another, improving 
articulation within each grade and from grade to grade, 
and trying whenever possible to integrate reading, 
writing, speaking, and listening skills. With the con- 
tinued support and concern of the community, staff, and 
students, these and similar goals of the language arts pro- 
gram in Chelmsford will be achieved. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF MATHEMATICS 

The mathematics program in the Chelmsford Public 
Schools strives to develop the creativity and competence 
of all its students in the application of mathematical 
knowledge. As in previous years, computational skills and 
problem solving abilities continue to be integral to the 
program. By establishing a careful equilibrium between 
the abstract understanding of concepts and the mastery 
of basic computational processes, teachers, parents and 
administrators are working diligently to develop 
mathematically literate citizens in the schools. 

The results of academic research continue to play an 
important role in the development of the mathematics 
curriculum. At the initial learning level, it has been 
shown that mathematical concepts are more easily 
understood if they are introduced through concrete 
representations. In order to integrate this finding into the 
curriculum, the Mathematics Resource Center has been 
expanded since its inception last year. The Center now 
contains many materials and curriculum resources that 
are valuable for instruction. A great majority of the 
teachers currently borrow materials from this Center to 
help improve their instructional techniques. In addition, 
this more efficient allocation and sharing of materials has 
not only resulted in a lower budget request for 
mathematics, but is has also increased the use of current 
and innovative materials in the classrooms. Because the 
use of many manipulative materials requires teacher 
training, additional workshops have been held for 
teachers. At the primary level during the past year, near- 
ly 80% of the instructional staff attended these voluntary 
workshops. 

The careful introduction of the metric system of 
measurement continues to be realized at the elementary 
level. In the last year, metric materials and curriculum 
information have been introduced to the intermediate 
level. Each elementary classroom is now equipped with 
the metric materials appropriate for the grade level. In 
addition, workshops to suggest effective teaching 
strategies have been held and will continue to be con- 
ducted for the benefit of the instructional staff. The con- 



version to the metric system will be very gradual in the 
society. In the schools, however, the conversion may pro- 
ceed more rapidly because many of the textbooks and 
teacher materials currently available emphasize heavily 
the metric system of measurement. 

The mathematics curriculum continues to make provi- 
sions for children with varying levels of ability in 
mathematics. For the most talented children, the MATH 
HORIZONS program continues to provide challenging 
materials to broaden and expand the mathematical 
knowledge of these students. For the remedial or learning 
disabled student, many of the schools now have special 
programs in mathematics to assist these students in learn- 
ing the basic mathematical skills. In addition, various in- 
dividualized learning programs are underway which en- 
courage children to explore mathematics at their own 
rate. 

At the secondary level, the mathematics program 
maintains numerous levels of instruction in largely 
homogeneous classes. Although mathematics is not a re- 
quired subject at the high school, nearly 90% of the 
students once again elected to study mathematics at some 
level. Students are able to choose courses ranging from 
Advanced Placement Calculus to Practical Living, a 
course emphasizing tax, banking, insurance and money 
management. In the next year additional semester 
courses will be implemented to provide a broader choice 
for students who do not anticipate further work in 
mathematically related fields. At the junior high level, 
new textbooks are being considered and in some cases 
adopted in order to reflect the inclusion of new content in 
the curriculum and to integrate the increased emphasis 
on basic skill acquisition. 

Increased interest in computers has caused the 
mathematics laboratory at the high school to become ex- 
tremely active this year. An average of 130 students visit 
this room each day in order to work with computer ter- 
minals and programmable calculators. Under the super- 
vision of the mathematics aide, the laboratory has 
become an integral part of Chelmsford High School. 
Semester courses utilizing the computer are offered not 
only by the mathematics department but also by the 
social studies and data processing departments. In addi- 
tion, a computer literacy unit has been developed which 
is now integrated into all basic geometry and algebra I 
classes. This unit is an attempt to provide an introduction 
and initial experience with the computer for all students 
who will graduate from Chelmsford High School. 

Increasing publicity is being given to minimal com- 
petency requirements which may be mandated by the 
Commonwealth. In anticipation of this possibility, two 
significant activities have taken place in the mathematics 
program. At the elementary level, a summer workshop 
was held during 1978 to develop a listing of basic skills to 
be taught at each grade level. This development sequence 
of learning tasks was distributed to all members of the 
elementary staff and will form the basis for any skills 
evaluation procedures. At the secondary level the 
Criterion Referenced Test of Basic Computational Skills 
continues to be improved. The initial form of this test was 
developed in 1974 and has been revised each subsequent 
year to provide increased reliability and validity. The test 



66 



is currently administered to all eighth graders with a 
slightly different form being given to ninth graders. At 
the present time, the results of the test are used to assist 
teachers in diagnosing the skill deficiencies of the 
students. 

Mathematics is both a highly organized system of 
abstract ideas and a series of functional and utilitarian 
tools. The mathematics program in Chelmsford 
recognizes these two extremes and is committed to 
establishing a dynamic parity between them. In this way, 
our goal to develop mathematically competent citizens 
will be realized. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF SCIENCE 

The Science curriculum in the Chelmsford Public 
Schools ia a well articulated program of inquiry and con- 
cept. 

The active participation of the student in the learning 
process is encouraged through multi-stimuli 
methodology. 

The K-6 program is divided into physical science and 
life science content area. A laboratory centered approach 
combining content, process, and attitude is the hallmark 
of the elementary SCIS program. The scientific content is 
reinforced through exposure to supplemental units, as 
well as scientific articles and readers designed for the 
elementary student. The science program at the sixth 
grade level deals with ecology and environmental studies. 
One segment of the program includes a unit dealing with 
the northeastern environment and is used in conjunction 
with a week-long outdoor environmental experience on 
Cape Cod. 

The secondary program continues the student's 
development by offering a comprehensive study of life, 
earth and the physical sciences at the junior high level. 
Emphasis at this level has been placed on basic concepts 
and skill building. The Health Education program at 
grade seven continues to strengthen the student's 
knowledge of the body systems and medical systems. The 
affective domain is stressed in dealing with the factors 
that change the individual's physical and chemical 
systems. The Honors Biology program in grade nine con- 
tinues to stress the environmental and ecological aspects 
of biology. 

In grade 10 through 12 the science program continues 
to emphasize a strong laboratory orientation. This past 
year through the efforts of the Health Education Cur- 
riculum Committee, a three week unit in Human Sexuali- 
ty was designed after an intensive in-service program. 
The in-service program was held at the University of 
Lowell and was attended by Health Education Cur- 
riculum Committee members and faculty representing all 
levels from the Chelmsford system. The resulting three 
week unit was then included in the sophomore biology 
curriculum. Although the unit was optional, it was over- 
whelmingly received by parents and students. 

The chemistry sequence is a highly structured program 
combining laboratory experiments and lectures. An in- 
dividualized program at the senior level prepares students 
for future success in chemical careers. This Advanced 



Chemistry program also prepares the students to take the 
College Board Advanced Placement test in chemistry. 

The Health Education program at the senior level pro- 
vides the student training in American Red Cross Basic 
First Aid and CPR. Students are also taught certain 
aspects of Family Living, Medical Insurance, and health 
related topics that will be of immediate use as they enter 
the world of work. CPR training is also being extended to 
as many senior students as possible. 

The photography classes continue to show increased 
enrollment. Students with a wide range of abilities con- 
tinue to achieve success and show heavy involvement in 
the photography project. 

Botany continues to be taught with a dual emphasis on 
plant physiology and structure as well as techniques for 
the human gardener. 

The Biology II course in Anatomy has shown increas- 
ing enrollment. Students are taught dissection skills on a 
laboratory speciman. The skeletal, muscle, circulatory, 
intestinal, and renal systems, all of these systems are then 
related to the human anatomy. 

The Science Program in the Chelmsford Public Schools 
attempts to provide each student with the necessary 
background .to perform his future role in society. The 
non-scientist must be as equally well-prepared as the 
scientist. All students must be exposed to the logic, 
simplicity and beauty of science. 



FROM THE COORDINATOR OF 
SOCIAL STUDIES 

Social Studies in the Chelmsford Schools continues to 
develop informed citizens who are prepared to par- 
ticipate intelligently in community, national or interna- 
tional concerns. 

Thus, our social studies curriculum has a dual, yet in- 
terrelated focus: recognizing the interdependence of all 
peoples and improving society in both community and 
greater world at large. 

In investigating the betterment of society, students use, 
among many activities, the rich heritage of Chelmsford. 
Through both field experiences and in-school utilization 
of local resources, students in many grades learn to ap- 
preciate and participate in their community. A few ex- 
amples follow. 

Many kindergarten students walk to nearby "com- 
munity helper" locales such as a fire or police station. 
Most second graders experience a day in the life of a col- 
onial child at the Old Garrison House, observing colonial 
craft demonstrations, tools, and touring a period house 
and barn. Other children in the same grade spend a mor- 
ning as colonial students reading and writing with 
primers and slates at the 1803 School House. These se- 
cond grade field experiences help to make "A Family of 
Early New England" a particularly effective social studies 
unit. 

As part of a unit which contrasts the communities of 
New York City and Chelmsford, many third grade 
students visit the Barrett -Byam Homestead. 



67 



Social studies in grades four and five focus on 
ecomomics and related technology in many communities 
- local, national and international. Some students visit 
businesses in the Greater Lowell area to observe our 
economic system at work. 

Grades seven and eight students may tour the Lowell 
Museum or prepare a Thanksgiving meal at the Old Gar- 
rison House. Prior to state or national elections, many 
grade nine students participate in a mock election com- 
plete with Chelmsford voting machines and voting 
booths. Results are published in local newspapers and 
then compared to subsequent official tabulations. Many 
grade nine students tour the State House and meet with 
State Representative Bruce Freeman. 

Last year a mock election for town and school officials 
took place at the high school. More than eighty students 
ran for offices such as Selectman, Police Chief or 
Superintendent of Schools. Those elected filled these of- 
fices for one day. 

Few of these Chelmsford educational experiences could 
take place without the donations of time and services 
from town residents and businesses. The Garrison House, 
Barrett-Byam Homestead and School House visits alone 
involve nearly 100 volunteers - parents, retired educators 
and members of historical groups. 

Firemen give their time to explain their community 
role. Marinel Transportation donates bus service to the 
1803 School House. Town officials visit the schools to ad- 
vise in mock elections. The Chelmsford Elks sponsor the 
mock election for town officials at the high school. The 
Adams and MacKay libraries become a hub of research 
activity for student reports. 

Chelmsford school children and teachers are grateful 
for this, and other, community support of social studies 
programs. 



FROM THE COORDINATOR OF 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS: 

With the direction of Dr. Gilchrist and the cooperation 
of the nurses and the physical education staff, a program 
of postural screening was initiated in the Chelmsford 
Schools this past Spring. 

The program involves screening children in Grades 5 
through 8 and is directed toward detecting any postural 
defects of the spine; namely, scoliosis, kyphosis, or lor- 
dosis. Any detections are referred to the parent for 
follow-up with their own physicans. 

Through a federal grant, a project called "Build Up" 
was instituted. This provided us with our first part-time 
physical educator working full time with adaptive 
physical education. Special needs children in five dif- 
ferent schools now have a physical education program in- 
volving testing, goalsetting, and evaluations. 

ATHLETICS: 

In 1978 the Chelmsford Schools have reached full 
equality of the sexes. We now have 11 varsity teams for 
boys and 11 for girls. This year we added Girls' Soccer 
and Girls' Swimming. 



1978 found us winning Conference Championships in 
Wrestling, Girls' Basketball, Boys' Tennis, and Football. 
For the first time ever, Chelmsford went to the Super 
Bowl for the high school football championship. 

It was a great year for Chelmsford Athletics, and we 
had the best overall won-loss record of any other Division 
II school in the state. A real credit to the student athletes, 
coaches, and the townspeople. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR 
OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

For the first time, foreign languages felt the impact of 
declining overall enrollments, especially at the junior 
high level. The department is attempting to meet this 
challenge by diversifying its offerings and by emphasizing 
the practicality of languages as an auxiliary skill for 
careers. 

The junior high French curriculum entered its second 
year of the conversion program to new audio-lingual- 
visual materials. If last year's experience is a reliable in- 
dicator, the new materials are working well in creating 
more verbally fluent students. 

Latin made significant gains in enrollments this year 
when Level I jumped from 40 students to 100. We now 
have 130 students enrolled in Latin I, II, and III. We 
believe these gains are the result of more appealing 
materials which make the study of the language accesible 
to a broader spectrum of student ability. The "back-to- 
basics" movement was also probably a factor in helping 
enrollments, inasmuch as Latin study has never ceased to 
improve grammatical awareness and English vocabulary 
acquisition. 

A Spanish IV Advanced Placement course was added 
to the curriculum in order to challenge highly-gifted 
students of this language. The Level IV curriculums in 
French and Spanish are now exactly parallel. 

Last year's exchange with a French high school was a 
most profitable experience for the American students. 
The exchange will continue next year with a new French 
high school located in Grasse, France. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR OF ART 

The Art Department has had an effective year. We 
now have an Art Specialist in every elementary school. 
We have added an Art Room at the South Row School, 
bringing the elementary total now up to four. These 
rooms have proven to be very successful, because we can 
see a space where the students can become fully involved 
in their work, but we can also find classroom teachers 
coming in with their classes to work on special projects. 
Of even greater importance are the many small groups of 
children that the Art Specialists can work with to try to 
improve manipulative and perceptual problems. 

The Junior High Schools have a new schedule which 
allows us to have the seventh and eighth graders for a 
period every day for one ten -week cycle during the year. 
This has met with great success, as it has permitted much 
greater concentration in daily contact with the visual pro- 
blems that are dealt with. 



68 



The ninth-grade program and the High School Art 
courses give evidence of areas where students are seriously 
involving themselves, learning skills and techniques of 
various media as they progress through the various pro- 
blems of color and design — and preparing them to go on 
to many professional art vocations. 

We are proud to report that our students have been ex- 
hibited and have won awards of varied degrees in 
Chelmsford, Lowell, Boston, and New York this past 
year. We have had small groups go on field trips to 
Boston's museums, and several local school groups have 
graciously assisted students to take Museum trips to 
Boston on some full grade levels. Every school had an Art 
Exhibit or show, and McCarthy Junior High joined with 
other departments in an Arts and Humanities Night. Our 
students have painted scenery for plays, made costumes, 
printed posters, made murals, created puppet theatres, 
made filmstrips, and in some way have worked with every 
other learning area in our continuing effort to make 
visual education improve the life and meaning of educa- 
tion of every student. 

This year will see us working on Humanities Days in 
both junior highs and the high school. Our year will 
culminate in Festival Day in May when we will sponsor a 
day when all our schools and all our community organiza- 
tions can proudly show what the year has produced. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR 
OF MUSIC 

The purpose of music education in the public schools 
of Chelmsford is to assist students to appreciate, unders- 
tand, participate, and respond with sensitivity to the 
aesthetic effect of music, according to their individual 
capacities. 

The Music Department is committed to excellence in 
music at all levels and strives to help students discover 
and develop their musical talents for better understan- 
ding and enjoyment of all kinds of music. 

Most elementary schools have a resident music 
specialist who is responsible for all music education in the 
building, with the exception of instruction on band and 
orchestral instruments. Each school has weekly lessons in 
music along with a performing choral group. All schools 
have song flute ensembles and/or recorder consorts. 
Some schools have guitar clubs, dance groups, or Orff 
bands. 

Our curriculum guide is based on the conceptual ap- 
proach. We have a spiral curriculum that begins in 
kindergarten and continues through junior high school . 

General music in the junior high school is required of 
all seventh and eighth graders, and is available to ninth 
graders on an elective basis. General music in seven and 
eight is basically designed for non-performing students 
and, for many, it is their last formal contact with school 
music. Choral groups are available on an elective basis to 
all junior high students. 

The high school has course offerings for both perform- 
ing and non-performing students.. A staff of two and 
one -third instructors offers courses in music appreciation, 
theory, guitar class, small and large vocal and instrumen- 



tal ensembles, instrumental instruction, and practice 
rooms for individual study. The Music Department pro- 
duces a broadway musical each spring. 

Instrumental music in our schools provides an ex- 
perience not found in other areas within the music 
department. Orchestral string instruments are offered 
starting in Grade 3, while all band and orchestral in- 
struments are included from Grades 5 through 12. Every 
interested student has an opportunity to participate in 
small-group instruction during school time, and 
ensembles during school time, or after school as part of 
the extra-curricular program. We have seen a declining 
student population with an increasing number of in- 
strumental students — from 362 in June of 1971 to over 
900 as of January, 1979. 

Instrumental ensembles participate in school and com- 
munity programs throughout the school year. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR 
OF CAREER EDUCATION 

Simply stated, Career Education is educating people to 
awareness of work and the range of career options open to 
them. Career Education links together education and the 
world of work. 

In last year's Town Report, I covered what our depart- 
ment was doing to help students link their education with 
the world of work. This year's report will deal with cur- 
riculum improvements. 

Business Education, Distributive Education, Home 
Economics, and Industrial Arts Curriculums require cer- 
tain expenditures of monies to make curriculum changes. 
This in part is necessitated by the type of equipment re- 
quired in these areas. To reduce the cost to the school 
system, teachers of the Career Education Department 
wrote four federal projects for equipment and supplies 
which were approved by the Massachusetts Department 
of Education in the amount of $37,932. One of the pro- 
jects included $18,132, for business education. This 
money was expended to provide two word processing 
typewriters which have the capacity to store information 
for use in the Typing III course and eight Lanier 
Transcribers for use in the Stenography 1 1 /Transcription 
Course . 

Citizens attending the Adult Evening Education 
Classes and who are updating their skills in order to meet 
today's labor demands will also have use of this new 
modern equipment. 

The Distributive Education Department received 
$7,800. of federal funds to update its curriculum area. 
The funds were spent in the areas of instructional sup- 
plies and equipment. The Distributive Education Depart- 
ment curriculum area concerns itself with introducing 
the students to the fields of distributing goods, both retail 
and wholesale, along with the service occupations related 
to these areas. A large amount of the profit of any retail 
or wholesale organization is reinvested in advertising. 
Visual display of one's product is very important in pro- 
moting and selling the product. Therefore, federal funds 
were expended to purchase audio-visual materials for this 
area. Since our students will be dealing with the visual 



69 



arts when they are working in their career fields, we want 
students aware of the proper techniques for meeting the 
needs of their prospective employers. 

Our project in Home Economics called "Development 
of Consumer and Homemaking Program Which Will 
Eliminate Academic and Sex Stereotyping for Home 
Economics" was for $5,500. 

The above funds were expended to increase the 
number and type of students who take Home Economics. 
We have been trying over the last few years to encourage 
students, both male and female, to take one or two 
courses in Home Economics which would help them when 
they graduate from high school and become "on their 
own." This first experience away from home can be quite 
a traumatic experience for some students. It is our objec- 
tive to help students make a smooth transition from the 
protected home/school environment to their first ex- 
periences away from home. 

The fourth federal project approved dealt with Industrial 
Arts. $6,500. was received to purchase a metallograph 
needed to complete the metallurgical laboratory. When 
the high school was built, the Building Committee voted 
not to purchase a metallograph for the metallurgical 
laboratory. With the purchase of this piece of equipment, 
the metallurgical laboratory is now fully equipped and 
students will be able to appreciate the total concept of the 
study of materials. 



70 



FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR 
OF INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA 

The 1977-78 school year was a very productive and suc- 
cessful one in the Chelmsford Public Schools' library pro- 
gram. This report is concerned with the activities in all 
the libraries. Because the Graphic Artist, Repair Techni- 
cian and Television Aide fall under the umbrella of the 
Instructional Materials Department, their reports are in- 
cluded. 

This year saw the completion of a program aimed at 
informing the elementary teachers in Chelmsford of the 
materials and services made available to them by the 
Chelmsford School library network. 

A total of five workshops were held for the elementary 
library assistants which were aimed at increasing their ex- 
pertise in librarianship, public relations with their 
clientele, and storytelling abilities. In addition to these 
workshops, five of our library assistants took a course in 
Children's Literature which broadened their knowledge 
of the field. Instruction in library skills continued this 
year at the elementary level. A very positive effect on the 
SRA scores has been made through this program, for the 
"use of sources" segment of the test showed the sixth 
grade's composite score at the 8th grade 5th month level, 
a two month growth over last year's scores. 

During the spring months preparation was made to re- 
assign the collection at the McFarlin school. The whole 
task was completed by the last week in July. 

A very satisfactory tea in honor of the volunteer parents 
was held at the Byam School on June 13th. It was most 
gratifying that two School Committee members were able 
to attend: Ms. Silva and Mr. Peters. Dr. Rivard was there 
and gave a gracious speech of thanks to the volunteers. 

The elementary librarians prepared book lists for sum- 
mer reading for the children. Copies of the lists were sent 
to the public libraries. 



The two junior high school libraries continued to be 
the scenes of much activity. Circulation and the use of the 
facilities by teachers and their classes increased greatly. 

The High School library is a fully functioning media 
center, made evident from the great variety of print and 
non -print materials available, and from the constant 
heavy use of these materials. For many teachers, the 
library was often a central feature of planning. Whole 
collections of books circulated to rooms and were main- 
tained on reserve. Student researchers took advantage of 
the extensive reference and periodical collections. 

With each year's passing, the demands upon the 
Graphic Artist increase as more and more teachers 
become aware of the services afforded by the Media 
Center and the greater utility of tailor-made software in 
the classroom. Transparencies, charts, posters, 35mm 
slides, video and audio tapes, slide-sync programs, letter- 
ing, scripts and many more items have been produced in 
great quantities. The lamination of teacher-made as well 
as commercially-produced materials prolongs their 
classroom life, resulting in a great saving of money. 

The television studio in the High School enjoyed a busy 
year, a total of 2,160 tapes were broadcast. 60 hours of 
new tapes were added to the collection. Language Arts, 
Social Studies and Science tapes were the most frequently 
used. The portapack was used to tape all soccer games 
and many basketball games. 

The Repair Technician was extremely busy during this 
past year. He repaired over 540 items of equipment, run- 
ning the gamut from video tape recorders to 16mm pro- 
jectors. During the summer months he, with the 
assistance of the Television Aide and a student worker, 
went to each school and checked all A/V equipment and 
television sets, cleaning and repairing when necessary. 

The statistics for circulation, total number of books in 
each school collection, the number of books added dur- 
ing this school year follow the main body of this report. 



SCHOO L 

WESTLANDS 

HARRINGTON 

BYAM 

NORTH 

CENTER 

SOUTH ROW 

HIGHLAND 

McFARLIN 

PARKER 

McCarthy 
high school 

TOTAL NO. 
BOOKS 



NO. BOOKS 

1977 

8,330 

9,702 

7.808 

7,700 

6,515 

7.094 
898 

7,375 

9,500 
10,900 
17,350 



NO. BOOKS 

1978 

8,986 
10,328 
9,323 
8,158 
7,100 
7,706 
1,023 
7,590 
10,950 
15,307 
22,115 



BOOKS ADDED 

1977-78 

656 

626 

515 

458 

585 

612 

125 

215 
1,450 
4,407 
4,765 



NO. OF 
STUDENTS 



765 

744 

588 

589 

572 

117 

270 

1,048 

1,272 

2,143 



BOOKS PER 
STUDENTS 

10.8 
13.5 
12.5 
13.6 
12 
13.2 
8.1 
55.2 
10.3 
12.2 
10.3 



C IRCULATIO N 

22.213 
26,448 
25,917 
20,470 
17.350 
18,820 

2,455 

5.229 
12.822 
11,270 

9,815 



FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR 
OF GUIDANCE 

Following are facts and Figures on the past graduating 
class including a section of statistics on Chelmsford resi- 
dents who graduated from Nashoba Tech; the combined 



figures provide an overview of Chelmsford public school 
graduates. 

Statistics for this class and the previous two are nearly 
identical even though the number of graduates increased 
significantly in 1978. 



71 



1976 



Number of graduating students 

Four-year colleges 

Two-year colleges 

Tech specialized plus nursing 

Total post-secondary 

Employment 

Undecided 

Military 

Marriage 

There were fewer drop-outs in the senior class this year 
— 23 vs. 28 a year ago; and fewer students who did not 
graduate for academic reasons — 22 this year vs. 39 last 
year. The overall drop-out figure remained the same — 
59 a year ago and 60 this year. 

ALL CHELMSFORD PUBLIC SECONDARY 

STUDENTS, CHELMSFORD HIGH AND 

NASHOBA REGIONAL TECHNICAL 

HIGH SCHOOL 



603 




319 


53% 


68 


11% 


38 


7% 


425 


71% 


127 


21% 


34 


4.7% 


15 


.3% 


2 


.03% 





Total Post- 
Secondary 


Total (employment 
Others military, etc. 


Chelmsford High Seniors 
Nashoba (Chelmsford Srs.) 


484 

3 

487 

Percentages 


201 = 685 

65 = 68 

266 = 753 


Chelmsford High Seniors 
Nashoba (Chelmsford Srs.) 


70.5 
4.3 


29.5 
94.2 

Combined 

64.6 



PLANS OF TOP 50 STUDENTS — CLASS OF 1978 



College 


Major 


1. 


Brown University 


Biology 


2. 


University of Colorado 


Chemical Engineering 


3. 


Georgetown University 


Foreign Service 


4. 


Boston College 


Biology 


5. 


Case Western Reserve 


Metalurgy 


6. 


Catholic University 


Music 


7. 


Duke University 


Nursing 


8. 


M.I.T. 


Chemistry 


9. 


University of Lowell 


Liberal Arts 


10. 


Southeastern Mass. University 


Art 


11. 


Marquette University 


Liberal Arts 


12. 


Wesleyan University 


Pre-Law and French 


13. 


Suffolk University 


Bio/Chem 


14. 


University of Connecticut 


Undeclared 


15. 


Washington Bible College 


Bible 


16. 


Holy Cross College 


Pre- Med 


17. 


Boston College 


Political Science 


18. 


University of Vermont 


Physical Therapy 


19. 


M.I.T. 


Chemical Engineering 


20. 


Boston College 


Political Science 


21. 


Georgetown University 


Foreign Language 


22. 


Southern Methodist University 


Undeclared 


23. 


Trinity (Conn.) 


Mathematics 


24. 


Connecticut College 


Foreign Language 


25. 


University of Lowell 


Chemical Engineering 


26. 


Boston College 


Biology 


27. 


University of Lowell 


Liberal Arts 


28. 


Framingham State 


Food Science 


29. 


Tufts University 


Occupational Therapy 


30. 


Renssalear Poly-Tech 


Mathematics 


31. 


University of Chicago 


Bio/Chem 


32. 


Union College 


Engineering 


33. 


Delhousie University (Canada) 


Biology 



1977 

609 
308 

93 

38 

439 

151 

7 

10 

2 



50.6% 
15.2% 
6.2% 
72% 
24.6% 
1.6% 
1.5% 
.03% 



1978 

685 
375 

79 

30 
484 
178 

11 

12 



54.7% 

11.5% 

4.3% 

70.6% 

26% 

1.6% 

1.7% 



34. Cornell University 

35. University of Massachusetts 

36. University of Lowell 

37. Air Force Academy 

38. Wesleyan University 

39. Colby College 

40. Mass. College of Pharmacy 

41. Middlebury College 

42. University of Massachusetts 

43. University of Massachusetts 

44. University of Lowell 

45. University of New Hampshire 

46. Fordham University 

47. Burdett College 

48. Bates College 

49. University of New Hampshire 

50. West Point 



Chemistry 

Liberal Arts 

Undeclared 

Engineering 

Music/English 

Liberal Arts 

Pharmacy 

Psych/Bio 

Business Administration 

Undeclared 

Undeclared 

Political Science 

Business Administration 

Secretarial 

Pre-Law 

Hydrology 

Engineering 



SUMMARY OF CAREER PLANS 
TOP 50 STUDENTS 



Undeclared 5 

Liberal Arts 5 

Biology 4 

Chemical Engineering 3 

Engineering 3 

Political Science 3 

Bio/Chem 2 

Business Administration 2 

Chemistry 2 

Foreign Service 2 

Mathematics 2 

Art 1 

Bible 1 

Food Service 1 



Foreign Language 

Hydrology 

Metalurgy 

Music 

Music and English 

Nursing 

Occupational Therapy 

Physical Therapy 

Pharmacy 

Pre-Law 

Pre-Law and French 

Pre-Med 

Psychology and Biology 

Secretarial 



TOP FIFTY STUDENTS 



University of Lowell 5 

Boston College 4 

University of Mass. (A) 3 

Mass. Institute of Tech. 2 

Georgetown University 2 

Service Academies 2 

Southeastern Mass. U. 1 

University of New Hampshire 2 
Wesleyan University 2 

Bates College 
Brown University 
Burdett College 
Case Western Reserve 
Catholic University 
Chicago, University of 
Colby College 
Colorado, University of 
Connecticut College 



Connecticut, University of 
Cornell University 
Delhousie University 
Duke University 
Fordham University 
Framingham State College 
Holy Cross College 
Marquette University 
Mass. College of Pharmacy 
Middlebury College 
Renssalear Poly-Tech 
Suffolk University 
Trinity College, (Conn) 
Tufts University 
Union College 
Vermont, University of 
Washington Bible College 
Southern Methodist 



72 



CAREER AND COLLEGE COUNSELING CENTER 

The Career and College Counseling Center at the High 
School continues to attract large amounts of students. An 
on-going schedule of speakers representing schools, col- 
leges and career topics continue to be of high interest to 
the students. In addition, there are two computer ter- 
minals, the GIS system and the MOIS system, which give 
instant information on colleges, careers, financial aide 
and career testing. 

There are many other resources available to the 
students; among them are bookshelves of college 
catalogs, reference books of all types, armed forces infor- 
mation and an A/V cassette viewer. The center is open 
every school day from 8:00 AM to 2:00 PM. Students may 
use these resources anytime during the day on their free 
mods. 



WORK-STUDY 1977-78 

During the school year, approximately ninety-five 
students participated in the Work -Experience Program 
for school credit. The majority of these students were 
seniors. About half of these seniors are planning to attend 
college. 

About ten of these will stay at their jobs after gradua- 
tion. A few have indicated an interest in military service, 
while the remainder are predictably undecided about 
their immediate futures. 

During the year, approximately eighty or ninety non 
work-study placements were also made. The bulk of the 
Work-Study Director's time is spent visiting employers for 
evaluations and job prospecting. 

This program continues as a very popular and 
beneficial part of the curriculum; beneficial to all con- 
cerned parties. 

For the first time, our local Rotary Club has become 
involved in our Work -Experience Program. They have 
invited interested students to participate in a vocational 
experience. This will be accomplished by the student 
"shadowing" a Rotarian for part of his work day to learn 
what his job entails so as to be in a better position to make 
a career decision. 



SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TEST 
(S.A.T.) STATISTICS 





Verbal 


Math 


Number Tested 




Mean Scores 






1972 - 








CHS Seniors 


464 


509 


355 


Other groups not available that year 






1973 - 








CHS Seniors 


459 


498 


315 


New England Seniors 


447 


482 


112.000 


Nation-wide Seniors 


445 


481 


1.014,704 


1974 - 








CHS Seniors 


458 


491 


394 


Greater Boston, HS Seniors 


445 


478 


32,669 


Mass. HS Seniors 


445 


477 


54,317 


New England Seniors 


447 


479 


111,307 


Nation-wide Seniors 


444 


480 


985.115 



1975 - 








CHS Seniors 


442 


487 


425 


Greater Boston HS Seniors 


434 


469 


34,576 


Mass. HS Seniors 


434 


469 


56,878 


New England Seniors 


437 


471 


115,734 


Nation-wide Seniors 


434 


472 


996,391 


1976 - 








CHS Seniors 


432 


478 


481 


Greater Boston HS Seniors 


433 


470 


35,081 


Mass. HS Seniors 


432 


469 


57,892 


New England Seniors 


435 


472 


117,163 


Nation-wide Seniors 


431 


472 


999,829 


1977 - 








CHS Seniors 


435 


476 


461 


Greater Boston HS Seniors 


432 


469 


34,195 


Mass. HS Seniors 


429 


465 


38,060 


New England Seniors 


432 


468 


116,185 


Nation-wide Seniors 


429 


470 


979,344 


1978 - 








CHS Seniors 


439 


487 


523 


Metro-Boston HS Seniors 


434 


470 


33,819 


Mass. HS Seniors 


430 


465 


57,827 


New England Seniors 


433 


468 


115,671 


Nation-wide Seniors 


429 


468 


989,185 



FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

Chelmsford High School has continued to provide 
meaningful educational opportunities for the young 
adults of the community. As a comprehensive high school 
charged with the responsibility of meeting the needs of all 
youngsters, pride is taken in the educational experiences. 
Honor and distinctions have been won in academic, 
athletic and extra-curricula areas. 

The Chelmsford High School Community was honored 
for the second straight year by being cited by the IAA 
Basketball Officials of Greater Lowell for "the highest 
degree of sportsmanship, character and ethics among its 
players, coaches and spectators in the conduct of its 
basketball programs". 

The Math Team continued to excel by capturing its 
sixth consecutive Merrimac Valley Championship as well 
as going undefeated in the conference for the fourth con- 
secutive year. The team placed third in the State, fourth 
in New England and sixteenth on the National Math Ex- 
am. 

Our Performance Arts Program had another banner 
year. The students presented an outstanding production 
of "Brigadoon". The Concert Band was judged best band 
at the Annual Fort Devens Band Festival. The orchestra 
placed second at the Annual MICA Band and Orchestra 
Festival. Many of our students participated as members 
of orchestras and bands in district and state festivals. Ten 
of them were part of the eighty (80) member "Greater 
Bostonians". 

The American Field Service Program continued to 
provide cultural exchanges for foreign students and 
Chelmsford High School students. Last year we hosted a 
student from Germany, one from New Zealand and a 
domestic student from California. This year students at- 
tend Chelmsford High School from Chile, Cyprus and Sri 
Lanka, and a domestic student from New York. 
Chelmsford students this year attended school in 
Belgium. California and Wisconsin. A program new to 
Chelmsford was introduced this year whereby we hosted 



73 



students from Finland and France under the auspices of 
Youth for International Understanding. 

Academically, the Class of 1978 continued the fine 
tradition of excellence in achievement by having three 
(3) National Merit Finalists and twenty-one (21) Letters 
of Commendation. 

The National Honor Society inducted one hundred 
fourteen (114) young men and women, forty (40) addi- 
tional members of the Class of 1978 and seventy-four (74) 
members of the Class of 1979. 

Seniors going on to higher education were awarded 
$27,000 in scholarships, exclusive of monies awarded by 
the universities to individual students. 

The already rich curriculum was enhanced by the ad- 
dition of Advanced Placement Programs in Spanish IV 
and American History. 

The High School Faculty and Administration 
presented the play "See How They Run" with all proceeds 
donated to the Town of Chelmsford Scholarship Fund. 

Chelmsford seniors again showed their concern for the 
needs of the community by sponsoring a Red Cross Blood 
Drive and donating over two hundred (200) pints of 
blood. 

The school is constantly in transition as attempts are 
made to provide the best possible educational oppor- 
tunities for our young people. There are still strides to be 
taken, efforts to be made, in order to fully realize the 
goals and philosophy of Chelmsford High School, but 
progress is being measured each year. 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Since September 1974, the Special Education Depart- 
ment has been implementing Chapter 766, the 
Massachusetts Comprehensive Special Education Law of 
1972. This past September, P.L. 84-142, the Federal 
Special Education Law, became effective. Both laws enti- 
tle special needs students to the right of a free and ap- 
propriate education. Students between the ages of three 
through twenty-one years, who have had a team evalua- 
tion and have not received a high school diploma or its 
equivalent, and for whom it has been determined by the 
Administrator of Special Education to have a special 
need, are eligible for special education services. 

As of September 1978, 640 students have been receiv- 
ing services provided by the Chelmsford Special Educa- 
tion Department. This represents 7.6% of Chelmsford's 
total school population. 

Chelmsford has developed a comprehensive special 
education department to serve the special needs of 
children in our community. To develop and implement 
the individual educational plans, the staff includes 
specialists in the areas of learning disabilities, speech 
pathology, adaptive physical education, occupational 
therapy, teacher of the visually impaired, tutors of the 
hearing impaired, psychological services, and social ser- 
vices. In addition, to serve the needs of students who re- 
quire a more specialized educational program there are 



twelve resource classes instructed by special education 
teachers who are assisted by instructional aides. 

To provide effective and cost efficient programs for 
children with low incidence disabilities, Chelmsford is a 
member of the Merrimack Special Education Col- 
laborative, sponsored by the Merrimack Education 
Center. The Collaborative serves the towns of 
Chelmsford, Billerica, Dracut, Tewksbury and Westford. 

A source of revenue to provide more comprehensive 
special education programs to special needs students has 
come from federal and state grants. Grant allotments for 
school year 1978-1979 totalled $101,617. and furnished 
capital for programs which would otherwise have been 
provided with local funds. It is hopeful that the federal 
government will continue its effort to provide financial 
support for development and expansion of programs for 
special needs students. 

One area of program expansion has been to provide 
vocational education for special needs students whose in- 
dividual educational plans outline this experience as an 
essential component to the student's total development, 
and to prepare the student for work experience at the ter- 
mination of his school career. 

The Special Education Department continues to place 
emphasis upon the early identification of preschool 
children within the three through four year old age 
range. Early identification and intervention will provide 
the necessary educational opportunity for success in 
school and, possibly, curtail the length of special services 
a child would need to receive. 

The Chelmsford School Committee believes that 
special needs students should have an opportunity to suc- 
ceed in school. The Committee is ever mindful of the 
fiscal responsibilities and is continually exploring means 
to provide effective programs while maintaining a 
responsible budget. 

FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
THE TITLE I PROGRAM 

Title I Project Independence is now in its fourth year in 
Chelmsford with target areas being the North and 
Westlands Schools. 

The Project includes pupils in Kindergarten through 
the fourth grade which offers supplemental instructions 
in basic skills pertaining to Reading through Language 
Arts and Mathematics. 

Team teaching is conducted by a group of 5 certified 
teachers with assistance from an instructional aide who is 
also a certified teacher, a full-time clerical aide, and is 
guided by a full time Director. The ratio of pupil-teacher 
is not to exceed 5 to 1 to insure individualization. 

Schedules on a pupil basis are created to avoid a con- 
flict with regular classroom instruction in critical areas of 
Math, Reading, and Language Arts. 

Normal Title I attendance comprises 30 minute 
periods daily in a specified area away from the classroom. 

The purpose of this Project is the implementation of an 
educational process for individual students which will 



74 



focus on reinforcing of academic weaknesses shown in 
pre-testing or by classroom teacher referrals. 

The specific goals of the Project are: 

1 . To product a measurable effect on pupil growth in 
Reading, Language Arts, and Mathematics. 

2. To diagnose, design, and implement individualized 
instruction. 

3. To improve the students self-image and confidence. 

4. To provide reinforcement and feedback to each stu- 
dent and appropriate classroom teacher so that they 
are aware of successes rather than failures. 

5. To make available high motivating material as a 
stimulus for learning. 

The above listed materials are multi-media and multi- 
level, such as, overhead projectors, filmstrips, previewers, 
head-sets, language masters, listening centers, record 
players, film projectors, and contracts which are in turn 
augmented by teacher or pupil prepared subject matter. 

P.A.C. (Parent Advisory Council) is a very necessary 
part of any Title I Program. Chelmsford has been most 
fortunate in the support from its target school areas. 

The group is led by a Home-School Coordinator work- 
ing in conjunction with your Title I Director. Her func- 
tions include the establishment of monthly P.A.C. 
meetings and the preparation of the informative news 
releases as well as making personal contacts. 

Outside evaluation contracted for each year by the 
Director has been awarded M.E.C. (Merrimack Educa- 
tion Center) located in Chelmsford and has resulted in 
outstanding "reports" based on Post-testing results of 
pupils, questionnaires submitted to staff, as well as mon- 
thly on-site observations. 

Chelmsford has been fortunate to have been selected 
for additional federal monies known as Collaborative 
Part B — C.A.I. (Computer Assisted Instructions) Pro- 
ject. This project includes the utilization of computers as 
tools of education. The program will be conducted at the 
Westlands School. 



IN CONCLUSION 

The year 1979 will bring new challenges and problems: 
improving the abilities of the school staff to match the 
needs of individual students with instructional programs, 
keeping instructional needs in balance with taxpayers' 
abilities, responding to increased state demands to pro- 
vide more services, coping with declining enrollments, 
and the like. 

There must continue to be shared responsibilities with 
students, parents, teachers, administrators, and school 
committee working together. With the commitment of 
Chelmsford school personnel, parents, students and 
citizens, one cannot help but feel a sense of confidence 
that Chelmsford can and will meet these challenges. 

Sincere thanks are once again extended to the town of- 
ficials and boards, to the school personnel, to the Parent - 
Teacher Organizations, to advisory study committees, 
school volunteer workers, and to the citizens for their 
cooperation and assistance this past year. 



The School Committee is most appreciative of the 
assistance rendered by the Chelmsford Jaycee-ettes when 
its members coordinated the efforts of local organizations 
and citizens in sponsoring the town-wide Pre-School Vi- 
sion Screening Clinic on September 16, 1978. 

The School Committee issued budget guidelines to the 
school administrators so that they could return to the 
Committee with realistic requests for personnel, services, 
equipment and supplies sufficient to maintain quality 
education while respecting citizen concerns about the ris- 
ing tax rate. These requests and their effect on schools 
were carefully studied by the School Committee. The fac- 
tors most responsible for the increase in the 1979-80 
school budget are: increases in salaries attributable 
primarily to negotiated increases in employee compensa- 
tion packages, increased cost in fuel and utilities, and in- 
creased cost in the 766 program largely due to numerous 
special services mandated by the state. The budget 
recommended for the 1979-80 school year is contained in 
the Finance Committee's Annual Report. 

Special reference is made to the retirement of the 
following members of the staff. Their service remains 
esteemed in the hearts and minds of the many who knew 
them. 

Mrs. Mildred Brown, Grade 3 Teacher, Westlands 

School 
Mrs. Ruth Costello, Art Teacher, Elementary Schools 
Mrs. Betty F. Coster, Grade 2 Teacher, North School 
Mr. Ignatius Greska, Custodian, McCarthy Jr. High 

School 
Mrs. Evangeline Holmes, Secretary, Center School 
Mr. Raymond N. Kydd, Head Custodian, Harrington 

School 
Mr. Edgar O. Larson, Head Custodian, McCarthy Jr. 

High School 
Mrs. Phyllis Lundgren, Secretary, McFarlin School 
Mrs. Dorothy Sexton, Business Education Teacher, 

Chelmsford High School 
Mrs. Ann Shanahan, Remedial Reading Specialist, 

Westlands School 
Mr. Joseph Sullivan, Head Custodian, Byam School 

IN MEMORIAM 

As we knew him in life, so shall we remember him. 
Mr. Kenneth Shaw, Custodian, Highland School 
Retired May 12, 1978, and died June 22, 1978. 



75 



NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL 
HIGH SCHOOL 

This past year has been an unusual year for the 
Nashoba District since one of the overtones was the con- 
tinuation of effort to add to the existing building, and br- 
ing the students from rented quarters into the main 
building. During this process a very interesting develop- 
ment occurred. First the Town of Ayer and the Town of 
Shirley showed interest and took the initiative to apply as 
new members to the Nashoba District. Following their ac- 
tion Townsend and Pepperell also showed an interest in 
joining the District. At the closing months of the year 
much work was being done to coordinate the efforts of 
the District Committee, the new towns interested in join- 
ing, and the different State Agencies contacted concern- 
ing the expansion of the District, may become a reality. 

The year ahead seems very promising with the thought 
the District in fact will be expanded for the benefit of all 
towns, and especially for the District students. The 
general programs in the school continued as usual, the 
house building project for this year was a home built for 
Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Kuja, Spectacle Pond Road, Lit- 
tleton, and the following departments were involved: 
Millhouse Carpentry, Drafting, Electrical, Painting & 
Decorating, Plumbing & Heating, and Metal Fabrica- 
tion. 

PUPIL SERVICES 



Director of Pupil Services 

Secretary 

Counselor 

Counselor 

Counselot 

Director of Special Needs 



Paul J. Royte 
Irene Hulslander 
Bruce Carpenter 
Doris Copoulos 
Vernon MacDonald 
Paul J. Royte 



Pupil Services Activities: 1978-79 

During the past year, the Department of Pupil Services 
of Nashoba Tech has engaged in a full school achieve- 
ment testing program which include grades nine through 
twelve. All pupils were examined as to their reading and 
mathematics skills with reports going to pupils, their 
parents and the school staff. 

Other services included: group and individual counsel- 
ing and guidance; an active job placement program 
which traditionally has been instrumental in placing an 
average of 92% of Nashoba graduates in jobs and/or fur- 
ther educational institutions; an emerging Career Infor- 
mation Center which will be open to all junior and senior 
school pupils in the district during the day and to adults 
four evenings a week. Additional activities are: an ag- 
gressive scholarship program making thousands of dollars 
available to graduating seniors; an innovated advanced 
study program with Middlesex Community College 
whereby Nashoba seniors with honor grades may take 
their studies at the college while continuing in their trade 
and receive credit for a freshman year at college while 
earning their high school diplomas and vocational cer- 
tifications. 



elude: Health Services with its Health Care Programs for 
all Nashoba pupils and staff; attendance and family and 
home consultation service; and a Special Services Depart- 
ment which is currently serving the special needs of 75 
pupils and is engaged in assessing 6 pupils for possible 
development of individualized educational plans under 
Massachusetts Public Law 766 and Federal Law 94-142. 

The following programs are available to these youngsters: 



Auto Body 


Automotive 




Culinary Arts 


Data Processing 




Drafting 


Electrical 




Electronics 


Graphic Communication 




Arts 




Health Occupations 


Machine 




Metal Fabrication 


Millhouse Carpentry 


Painting & Decorating 


Plumbing & Heating 


Academic 








Budget 


Budget 




1978-79 


1979-80 


Operating and Maintenance Budget 




1000 Administration 


110,692 


116,006 


2000 Instruction 


1,289,252 


1,370,395 


3000 School Services 


194,838 


213,137 


4000 Operation of Plant 


277,632 


296,389 


5000 Fixed Charges 


143,681 


135,856 


Total Operating 


2,016,095 


2,131,783 


6000 Community Services 








7000 Equipment 


62,000 


27,890 


8000 Debt Retirement and 






Debt Services 


277,700 


264,475 


Total Capital 


339,700 


292,356 


9000 Adult Education 


42,100 


41,900 



Grand Total Budget 



2,397,895 2,466,048 



Other departments represented by Pupil Services in- 



76 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen: 

I herein respectfully submit for your information and 
review, the Annual Report of the Police Department for 
the Fiscal Year 1978. 

At the present time the department is made up of 50 
permanent men. 

Chief of Police 

Robert E. Germann 

Deputy Chief of Police 
James C. Greska 

Sergeants 

Leslie A. Adams John J. Mack 

ArmandJ. Caron William R. McAllister 

Walter E. Edwards, Jr. Phillip N. Molleur 

Pennryn D. Fitts Raymond G. McCusker 

Raymond McKeon 

Patrolmen 



Richard A. Adams 
Edgar L. Auger 
John J. Bell 
Mark L. Burlamachi 
Robert M. Burns 
Steven A. Burns 
David C.Campbell 
Lance Cunningham 
Patrick W. Daley 
Bruce A. Darwin 
Frederick G. Dillon 
John J. Donovan 
Kenneth R. Duane 
BlairJ. Finnegan 
John G. Harrington 
Charles D. Harvey 
Edwin P. Hodgson 
James J. Kerrigan 
Ronald A. Leach 

Ernest R. 



Roland E. Linstad 

Russell H. Linstad 

Henry R. McEnany 

James F. Midgley 

Thomas A. Niemaszyk 

Timothy F. O'Connor 

Robert A. Popplewell 

John E. Redican 

Francis X. Roark 

Edward C. Rooney 

Michael E. Rooney 

John B. Sousa 

William A. Strobel, Jr. 

Robert J. Trudell 

Howard R. Ubele 

Daniel J. Walsh 

Eugene W. Walsh 

JohnO. Walsh 

William R. Walsh 

Woessner, Jr. 



Intermittent Patrolmen 



Francis M. Conlon 
William C. Davis 
James T.H. Finnegan 
Jared Finnegan 
William J. Floyd 
Joseph R. Gamache 

Police Matrons 

Grace Auger 
Nora Clifford 



Francis P. Kelly 

John M. McGeown, Jr. 

James F. Palmer 

Chandler Robinson 

William R. Ryder 

Michael W. Stott 



Mary Long 
Emily Peake 



MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 

1977 

Calls Answered by Cruisers 12,732 

Summons Served 1,265 

Licenses Suspended 42 



1978 

15,146 

1,554 

53 



Accidents Reported 

Personal Injuries Reported . . . 

Fatal Accidents 

Mileage of Cruisers 

Special Property Checks 

Station Lockups 

Citations Issued 

Parking Violations 

Doors and Windows found open . 
Detoxification Unit 



1,269 


1,430 


331 


312 


4 


1 


11,072 


436,243 


4,164 




1,017 


487 


1,478 


3,541 


854 


638 


194 


189 


400 


335 



RECEIPTS TURNED OVER TO THE TOWN 

1977 1978 

Photocopying Machine $2,742.00 $3,470.00 

Firearm Permits 

Bicycle Registrations 

Firearm Identification Cards . . . 

Court Fines 

Photographs 

Police Detail Account 

Service Charge 



844.00 


2,030.00 


22.75 


50.25 


544.00 


457.00 


1,858.55 


2,153.50 


162.00 


386.00 


4,627.46 


3,767.69 



Training and Education are still very important within 
our department. At this time we have men attending the 
following: 

Northeastern'University 5 Men 

Middlesex Communtity College 2 Men 

Lowell University 2 Men 

Nashoba Tech 1 Man 

Other Training Courses that our men attended in 1978 

Mass Criminal Justice Training Council 

Hostage Management Training School 

Breathalyzer Training School 

Criminal Offenders Record School 

Fingerprint School 

Police Training Academy 

Attorney Generals Office School 

Drug Abuse Education School 

Battered Women Conference 

Massachusetts Department of Public Safety . . . 

Arson Investigation 

Advanced Fingerprint School 

Crime Scene Search School 

Photography School 

File Conversion and Orientation 

Eastman Kodak Seminar on Law Enforcement . 

New England Narcotic Conference 

Crime Reporting Seminar 

Hold Up Alarm Seminar 



3 Men 

5 Men 
1 Man 
1 Man 

6 Men 

1 Man 

1 Man 

2 Men 

1 Man 

2 Men 

1 Man 

2 Men 

3 Men 

1 Man 

2 Men 
2 Men 



Permanent School Traffic Supervisors 



Grace Auger Karen Flynn 

Helen Chafe George Johnson 

Janet Connor Jean McPhail 

Irene Corsetti Diane Zebney 

Margaret Dillon Loretta Weaver 

Alternate School Traffic Supervisors 

Estelle Abely Barbara Gibb 

Martha Barrett Carol Haley 

Sheila Riley 



Secretaries 



Nora F. Clifford 



Pauline B. Gervais 



77 



Custodian 

John P. Curran 

ARRESTS 

Crimes Against Persons 57 

Crimes Against Property 134 

Crimes Against Public Order 1,444 



DISPOSITION OF CASES IN 1978 

Fined 836 

Placed on Probation 63 

Suspended Sentence and Placed on Probation .. 15 

Placed on File 112 

Not Guilty Finding 10 

Dismissed with Probable Cause for Arrest 27 

Ordered to Pay Court Costs and Continued 

W/O Finding 54 

Committed to Youth Service Board 5 

Committed to M.C.I. Walpole 5 

Committed to M.C.I. Concord 2 

Committed to M.C.I. Billerica 12 

Turned over to out of town Police Dept's 

and Courts 99 

Cases Continued without a Finding 3 

Placed on Alcohol Safety Program 60 

Ordered to Pay Restitution 22 

Deferred Sentences 13 

Cases Pending and Continued in the Courts .... 297 



This year we have had two men retire from the Police 
Department. Charles Hadley retired after 20 years as a 
permanent full time Police Officer. Richard Simpson 
after more than 7 years as a permanent full time Police 
Officer. 



Officer John Campbell deceased in February 1978 after 
17 years with the Police Department. 



Louise Pigeon, Clerk at the Police Department retired 
after 11 years with the Police Department and 4 years 
previous to that at the Accounting Office for the Town of 
Chelmsford. 



Two new sergeants were appointed in November, Sgt. 
John Mack and Sgt. Philip Molleur. Appointed tem- 
porary sergeant was Raymond McCusker. 



This year, 1978, while patrolling the highways and 
roadways of our town, the mobile units covered 436,243 
miles in our cruisers. 



At this time we would like to express our thanks and 
appreciation to the Bournival Plymouth Company of 
Lowell for the donation of our safety car. Our Safety 
Department is very active and very important to us. 

In conclusion, I would like to offer my sincere ap- 



preciation and thanks to the various officials and depart- 
ment heads, the Captain, the Sergeants, and the Patrol- 
men and also the citizens of the town for their continued 
help and cooperation. Because of their combined effort, I 
am sure Chelmsford is a safer, better place in which to 
work and live. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert E. Germann 
Chief of Police 



AUXILIARY POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Director — Walter W. Edwards Jr. Deputy Chief 
Coordinator— Basil Larkin, Sgt. (retired) 

The Chelmsford Auxiliary Police served the town on 15 
occasions during 1978. Duty ranged from parades, road 
races, halloween, dog show, band concerts, fires to the 
Blizzard of '78. During the blizzard the auxiliary 
transported nurses and doctors to the various hospitals 
and nursing homes, assisting disabled motorists, deliver- 
ing prescriptions to citizens in need of medications and 
assisting Civil Defense during the state of emergency. 

The Vacation Housecheck program was expanded to 
cover the schools, 4736 house checks and 821 school 
checks were made. Over 16,000 miles were logged during 
the 154 nights of patrol operation. 

Training continued with the unit being recertified in 
CPR. 

Total man hours for 1978 are 6167 of which 4306 were 
duty, 1220 training and 641 on work projects. 



Roster 



Emil Aberizk 
Robert Abreu 
Loyd Anstey 
William Aresnault 
Craig Brigham 
George Brown 
Paul Dean 
Richard Demers 
Douglas Drobnis 
James Ernst 
Leroy Fielding 
Leo Flanagan 
Roger Gregoire 
Alan Grekula 



Anne Grekula 

John Hartnett 

William Keenan 

Leland Kelly 

Costas Kevghas 

Richard Meaney 

Frederic Mehan 

Edward Norton 

Bruce Pemberton 

Bradford Poole 

James Quinn 

David Ramsay 

Nicholas Stratis 

Paul Villare 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

The following is a report of the Highway Department 
for the year 1978: 

Year No. Reg. H'way No. Reg. Waste 
Employees Col. Employees 

1955 21 3 

1966 27 13 



78 



1978 



37 



16 



The following streets were accepted at the Annual 
Town Meeting: 

Higate Road Ext. 
Industrial Ave., Ext. 

Spring Clean Up Days were conducted during the week 
of May 1 through May 5 and Fall Clean Up Days were 
conducted during the week of October 16 through Oc- 
tober 20. 

Drainage projects include the following: 

Colonial Terrace - 486 feet - 18" R.C. Pipe, 3 catch 
basins, 3 manholes installed. 

Riverneck Road 256 feet - 12" R.C. Pipe, 2 catch 
basins installed. 

Montview Road - 60 feet - 12" Asphalt Coated Pipe. 

Freeman Road - 130 feet - 12" R.C. Pipe, 2 catch 
basins installed. 

High St. (at R.Rd.) - 96 feet - 12" R.C. Pipe, 4 catch 
basins installed. 

Bowl Road - 32 feet steel pipe - 12", 1 catch basin in- 
stalled. 

Waverly Ave. - 86 feet - 8" corrugated pipe, 1 catch 
basin installed. 

Ripley Street - 40 feet - 8" corrugated pipe. 

Butterfield Street - 20 feet - 31" x 50" Pipe Arch Cul- 
vert, two stone headwalls. 

Mill Rd. @ Domonic Dr. - 30 feet - 12" corrugated 
pipe, 1 stone headwall. 

Middlesex Street - 232 feet - 10" asphalt coated pipe, 2 
catch basins, 1 manhole installed. 

Gregory Road - 135 feet - 15" R.C. Pipe. 

Trotting Road - 35 feet - 10" corrugated pipe, 1 catch 
basin, 1 manhole installed. 

Noble Drive - 180 feet - 12" asphalt coated pipe, con- 
struction of swale to brook, removal of willow tree. 

Under Chapter 825 the following drainage projects 
that were designed by the Consulting Engineers, Em- 
mons, Fleming & Bienvenu, Inc. and awarded to con- 
tractors for construction were completed; North Road at 
Linwood Street; Janet Road; Swain Road; Dunstable 
Road and High Street. 

The town wide Recycling Program was implemented 
on April 24, 1978 which included recycling a combina- 
tion of mixed glass and cans, and papers on a weekly 
basis. On May 17, 1978 the Board of Selectmen announc- 
ed suspension of the program due to a change in the 
market place conditions for mixed glass and cans. How- 
ever, the town has continued with the monthly pickup of 
papers. 

New equipment approved and purchased for the 
Highway Department are as follows: (1) Dump Truck; (1) 
Truck Cab & chassis; (1) Sander Body; (1) Pickup Truck; 
(2) Snow Plows; (1) Front End Loader; (1) Sidewalk Trac- 
tor Snow Plow. 



rebuilding and repairing sunken catch basins, sanding, 
snow plowing and snow removal, sweeping streets, 
drainage and general maintenance was performed 
throughout the year. 

I wish to thank the townspeople for their kind consid- 
eration and cooperation and the Police Department for 
notifying the department of dangerous road conditions 
during the winter months. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Louis Rondeau 
Supt. of Streets 



CIVIL DEFENSE COMMITTEE 

Walter R. Hedlund, Director 

George J. Brown William W. Edge 

Melvin P. Dejager Walter W. Edwards 

George R. Dixon Donald Savage 

Joseph E. Staveley 

The Office of Emergency Preparedness Civil Defense 
Committee, which has been meeting regularly on the se- 
cond Tuesday of each month, all necessary papers and 
reports for State and Federal Civil Defense have been 
reviewed and completed, making the town eligible for 
surplus government equipment at the Taunton Surplus 
Property Depot. 

The Communications Center has participated in mon- 
thly drill with the Mass. CD. Headquarters, Area 1 in 
Tewksbury, and other cities and towns Emergency 
Operating Centers. 

The Town Emergency Operating Center, in Town Hall 
was activated, Feb. 7th, following a State of Emergency 
declared by the Board of Selectmen, for The Blizzard of 
'78, all department heads and personnel are to be com- 
plimented for their excellent response and cooperation 
during the period of the Emergency, much assistance and 
help was provided by the Mass. and Area CD. Agencies, 
heavy snow removing equipment from the U.S. Army 
Corps, of Engineer's. 

The Auxiliary Police, have been most effective this past 
year, members having volunteered countless hours during 
the Blizzard, The Vacation House Check and various 
Celebrations in the Town. 

We wish to thank the Board of Selectmen, the Admin- 
istrative Assistant, all departments and personnel in the 
town for their cooperation received this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund 
Director 



The usual oiling of streets, including mix-in-places, 
brush cutting, fabricating, replacing and installing street 
signs, painting traffic lines, cleaning catch basins, 



79 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen: 

I hereby submit my report of the Fire Department for 
the year ending December 31, 1978. 

The "Great Blizzard of 1978" caused some anxious 
moments for the Fire Department as many streets were 
impassable. However, with the doubling of manpower in 
all stations we did not incur any serious incidents. 

Two major fires in December, 1978, the State Line 
Lumber Co. and The Fiske House show the greatest loss 
in the departments history. 

This year the Fire Department recommends that we 
replace a 1972 Pick-up and a 1973 Sedan. 

I wish to express my thanks to all town officials and 
employees for the excellent cooperation given to the fire 
department during the past year, and again like to con- 
gratulate and thank the men of the department for conti- 
nuing to maintain the high standard of courage and 
ability that has been shown in the past. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frederick H. Reid 
Fire Chief 



Fire Chief 

Frederick H. Reid 

Deputy Fire Chief 

Edward G. Quinn 



Allen C. Mello 
Charles S. Galloway, Jr. 



Captains 



James M. Spinney 
Ronald J. Sawicki 



Ronald O. Wikander 
Secretary 

Mary Ann Koulas 

Firefighters 

Thomas P. Miskell 
Arthur G. Anderson 
Bertrand E. Dixon, Jr. 
Charles Ferreira 
Robert K. Adams 
Alvin F. Wetmore 
JackD. Hadley 
Harvey M. Miller 
Robert A. Bennett 
Robert R. Gagnon 
Harold J. Pierce, Jr. 
Donald A. Weber 
Paul D. Henderson 
Peter T. Wetherbee 
Francis J. Conlin 
Donald A. Drew 
James T. Cutter 
Gerald D. Tonks 
Richard P. O'Neil 
Robert L. Hughes 
Thomas J. Curran 
James P. Flaherty 
Joseph F. Lynch 
Paul D. Hayes 
Terrance A. Goode 
William H. Hadley 
Leo A. Martin 
Emil P. Magiera 



Philip Dube 

Joseph E. Staveley 

John P. DePalma 

Walter F. Adley, Jr. 

Dennis Vargeletis 

Richard L. Grenon 

Ronald L. Johnson 

Wallace V. Maybury, Jr. 

William V. Cady.Jr. 

James A. Sousa 

William F. Curran 

Daniel T. Reid 

Joseph J. Spinazola 

Michael McTeague 

Ernest J. Frobese 

James P. Curran 

Charles A. Schramm 

Peter C.Johnson 

William M. Burke, Jr. 

Edward J. Nolet 

Michael F. Curran 

Michael D. Ridlon 

William H. Jamer 

Raymond R. Kydd 

James Boermeester 

William Dalton 

Thomas D. Miskell 

David Gelineau 



Mechanic 

Jack Smith 



CALLS FOR ASSISTANCE 1978 



Vehicle Accidents 

Brush 

Building 

Dump 

False — Malicious 

False — Accidental 

Misc. 

Lock Out 

Medical Assistance 

Vehicle 

Mutual Aid 

Total 



1 


to 
4 


4 


< 
2 


s 

3 


3 
1 


3 

4 


< 
3 


V 

6 


O 
7 


Z 
7 


Q 
5 


3 


1 


4 


55 


45 


21 


20 


4 


4 


39 


34 


9 


18 


8 


6 


11 


8 


10 


8 


7 


4 


39 


34 


9 














1 























3 


1 


4 


5 


3 


4 


3 


3 


8 


6 


10 


9 


4 


3 


2 


3 


6 


6 


2 


6 


4 


3 


4 


7 


34 


17 


23 


33 


39 


29 


28 


23 


27 


36 


22 


19 








1 


2 





1 


1 





2 


1 


1 


2 


24 


25 


17 


13 


19 


18 


22 


10 


22 


18 


25 


13 


3 


7 


2 


6 


11 


12 


8 


7 


12 


8 


15 


11 


2 


1 





7 


1 


2 


1 





3 





2 






92 67 63 137 136 105 97 63 92 126 134 
Total Number of Calls for the year 1978—1198 



80 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Paul McCarthy, Chairman 
Peter Dulchinos PaulJ. Canniff, D.D.S. 

Health Department Personnel 

Director of Public Health Health Inspector 

Thomas W. Morris, R.S. John P. Emerson, Jr. 

Jr. Clerk 

Kathleen E. Jones 



Board of Health Physician 
Michael A. Gilchrist M.D. 

Water Pollution Control 



Town Nurse 
Linda Lawlor, RN B.S. 



In 1978 the water pollution control program continued 
its effort to clean up the streams. Director made 8 Court 
appearances relative to violations. The Board performed 
25 dye tests. Septic System permits issued (new) 77. Septic 
System permits issued (repair) 119. Four inspections were 
made of Nursing Homes. Thirty-seven inspections made 
for Article 2 Housing. School inspections 18. Complaints 
received and checked, 241. Stable inspections, 7. Camp 
Paul inspected 3. Bathing Beaches, 22 inspections. 
Streams tested for coliform, 64. Certify International 
Travel Vaccination Books, 53. Restaurants inspections, 
111. 

Administration and Management 

Income for various services and permits is listed below: 



Percolation tests — 74 
Sewage Permits— 177 
Miscellaneous licenses & Fees 



$1,110.00 
fl, 770.00 
$2,181.50 



Due to a mandate of a special Town Meeting the board 
of Health caused the Town to be sprayed by aerial ap- 
plication to rid the Town of mosquitos. 

Aerial spraying— $8,000.00 

Rabies Clinic 

Administered by Martin Gruber, D.V.M., a total of 
295 dogs were innoculated against rabies. 

Public Health 

Communicable Disease Program 

Part of the duties of the public Health Nurse include 
follow-up on certain reportable diseases as mandated by 
the Ma. Department of Public Health. An epidemiologic 
investigation is undertaken by the Town Nurse and the 
report is submitted to Department of Public Health. 
Reports on the following diseases were completed during 
1978. 



Tuberculosis 

Hepatitis 

Meningitis 

Salmonella 

Measles 

Encephalitis 

Mumps 



active cases 
7 reports 
5 reports 
3 reports 
1 report 
1 report 
1 report 



The testing of persons exposed to active tuberculosis 
and those persons whose employment require certifica- 
tion of freedom from that disease is another responsibility 
of the town nurse. Three hundred and twenty tests were 
given to the Town residents. Home visits are made to 
families with active tuberculosis on a periodic basis to in- 
sure understanding of the illness and that adequate 
medical follow-up is achieved. 

Maternal Child Health Services 

Home visits are made to families with newborns and 
premature infants by physician referral. Visits are made 
for health supervision, education and referral when in- 
dicated. There were twenty-seven visits made to families 
under this program, and referrals were made to Crippled 
Children's Program, Headstart, Solomon Mental Health, 
and Congenital Anomalies Clinic. 

Immunization Program (Preschool) 

The Board of Health offered immunization clinics this 
year. Lead testing was also offered at these clinics. There 
were 7 lead tests and twenty preschool children immuniz- 
ed. 

Immunization Program 

The Board of Health sponsored two flu clinics this 
year. The vaccine was offered to the elderly and chronic- 
ally ill persons as recommended by Mass. Department of 
Public Health. Four hundred and twenty persons were 
immunized with flu shots. Sixty persons were immunized 
with the pneumonia shot. 

Paul McCarthy, Chairman 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Property taxes and levels of assessment have been ma- 
jor issues in the minds of local, state and national govern- 
mental bodies during the past year and more attention 
has been focused on local assessing departments. During 
the November elections, many tax payers contacted our 
office to express their concern with the issue of classifica- 
tion and its effect on the local tax rate. An analysis of cur- 
rent assessing practice in Chelmsford showed that there 
would be little effect on the rate. 

Classification, if it is found to be constitutional, re- 
quires each city and town to first value properties at full 
and fair cash value and then to assess each category 
(residential, commercial, industrial and open land) at a 
different percentage. Chelmsford was revalued in 1972 
and the tax base equalized so that similar properties pay 
similar amounts of taxes. As property values have increas- 
ed, the assessment level has dropped from 100 percent 
but the tax base is still equalized so that bringing assess- 
ments to full and fair cash value should not affect the ac- 
tual tax dollars paid by the individual homeowner. 

In compliance with the state's requirement to move to 
full value, the Assessors have been engaged in a program 
of updating our record cards by physically visiting each 



81 



property in town. This does not constitute a revaluation 
per se, but a correcting of existing records which will con- 
tinue this year. 

Building permit activity remained at about the same 
level as last year with 380 permits taken out. The break- 
down is as follows: 60 new dwellings; 11 signs; 24 com- 
mercial; 61 repair/remodel; 18 sheds; 46 pools; 7 
demolish; 118 additions; 29 condominiums; 5 miscell- 
aneous and 1 void. There was an increase of $4,419,350 
in real estate and personal property valuation this year. 

Of the $24,153,304 to be raised to meet the costs of 
running the town and meeting our state and county 
assessments, $16,085,238 or 66.5% came from local taxa- 
tion. Another $1,178,211 was derived from motor vehicle 
excise. 



Exemptions granted were: 
Type 

Clause 41 (Elderly) 
Clause 41 A (Deferral) 
Clause 22 (Veterans) 
Clause 37 (Blind) 
Clause 1 7 (Widows) 
Clause 18 (Hardship) 



The Board has continued to pursue a professional 
education with all three Assessors and our new ad- 
ministrative assistant, Diane Phillips attending courses 
given by the Association of Massachusetts Assessors. Mrs. 
Delaney received her designation as Massachusetts Ac- 
credited Assessor while Chairman Janet Lombard has 
served on the executive boards of the State and County 
Assessors Associations and chaired a computer committee 
and a committee to update the laws pertaining to local 
taxation. 

DEPT. OF VETERANS' SERVICES 

I respectfully submit the Annual Report of the ac- 
tivities of this Department, as Veterans' Agent and In- 
vestigator for the year 1978. 



VETERANS' BENEFITS 
Cash and Material Grants 



No 


Total 


218 


$107,835 


9 


11,603 


513 


94,286 


15 


6,562 


24 


4,200 


28 


13,278 



Month 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



Amount 

6,135.00 
9,138.00 
5,798.00 
4,917.00 
6,112.00 
8,199.00 
3,627.00 
3,200.00 
5,733.35 
2,319.00 
2,800.00 
4,226.58 



VETERANS' SERVICES 

Autos and special equipment for disabled 
veterans $ 2,000 

Compensation to dependents for veterans service- 



connected death 
Dependents indemnity compensation 
Sons, daughters, wives and widows educational 

assistance 
Specially adapted housing for disabled veterans 
Veterans death pension 
Veterans disability compensation 
Veterans disability pension 



13,000 
156,000 

35,000 

2,000 

217,000 

1,204,000 

232,000 

Veterans insurance and indemnities 176,000 

Veterans readjustment training 469,000 

Veterans burial awards and other miscellaneous 

benefit payments 28,000 

Vocational rehabilitiation training for disabled 

veterans 17,000 



Total 



$2,551,000 



PROVIDED TRANSPORTATION 
FOR VETERANS 



To: Bedford V.A. Hospital 
Brockton 
Jamaica Plain 
West Roxbury 

Total 



75 

28 
20 



131 



Massachusetts Veterans' Services Department is con- 
tinually revising their directives to help the veteran and 
his family, and we have stayed on top of this by attending 
the quarterly meetings of the Middlesex County Veterans 
Agents Association and the Boston office of Veterans' 
Benefits. 

The types of assistance rendered by this office vary 
greatly and include: medical, educational, death 
benefits, financial aid, etc. In order to successfully ad- 
minister our duties, we have a constant line of com- 
munication with many other agencies such as the 
Veterans Administration, Social Security, Division of 
Employment Security, CETA Administration, Public 
Welfare, Council on Aging and others. We are grateful 
for their assistance and support. 

The Department of Veterans' Services wishes to thank 
the town officials, board members, employees, and all of 
the Veterans organizations for their fine cooperation dur- 
ing the past year. 

If anyone has any questions, please feel free to call the 
office at 256-8713 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 
4:30 p.m. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary K. McAuliffe 
Veterans' Agent 



Total 



$62,205.13 



82 



VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 

Treasurer's Report to the Board of Selectmen 
January 1, 1978 to December 31, 1978 
RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

Balance on Hand as of January 1st, 1978: $6,799.41 

Add Receipts: 

The Central Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

Interest $233.02 

The Commonwealth Federal Savings and 
Loan Association of Lowell, Mass. 
Dividends $177.00 

Total Receipts 410.02 

Total Balance on Hand as of January 1st, 1978 and 
Receipts $7,209.43 



ASSETS 

Central Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

On Deposit, Bank Book Number 128790 . . .$4,609.43 

The Commonwealth Federal Savings and Loan Asso- 
ciation, Lowell, Mass. 
Savings Term Certificate, Account Number 
901-035-01 2,600.00 

Total Assets $7,209.43 

LIABILITIES 

Total Liabilities $ None 

Total Assets, Less Liabilities $7,209.43 



Respectfully yours, 

Alfred H. Coburn 
Treasurer 



Dr. Ablert W. Willis, retired from the committee during 
1978. Mr. Charles E. Jangraw was appointed by the 
Selectmen to fill this vacancy. 

Once again we list the members of our committee in 
the event that future applicants might care to submit re- 
quests for information and/or applications for assistance 
to them. The precinct representatives are listed as 
follows: 

Precinct 1 : Charles E. Jangraw 

Precinct 2: Victor W. Fetro 

Precinct 3: James J. Walker 

Precinct 4: John J. McNulty 

Precinct 5: George F. Waite 

Precinct 6: Algred H. Coburn 

Precinct 7: Thomas A. Ennis 

Precinct 8: Dr. Kenneth A. Cooke 

Precinct 9: Peter J. Saulis 

Precinct 10: Melvin P. dejager 

Precinct 11: Herbert T. Knutson 

Precinct 12: Gerard A. Vayo 

The Committee extends their appreciation to the 



Selectmen, to the town Veterans' Agent, Mrs. Mary K. 
McAuliffe, other town officials and employees for the 
kind assistance given to the committee during the past 
year. 

Respectfully yours, 

Alfred H. Coburn 
Chairman 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

Charles Higgins, Chairman 

Carolyn Bennett, Vice Chairperson 

Florence Kelley Alternates 

Daniel Burke Joe Dappel 

Marshall Arkin Dennis Valdenocci 

Michael Earhartic 

The Board of Appeals heard 60 requests for special 
permits/variances, and they were disposed of as follows: 



Granted 

Denied 

Withdrawn 

total 



38 

16 

6 

60 



The Board would like to take this opportunity to ex- 
press their thanks to all Town Officials and Town bodies 
who assisted us in our endeavors. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles Higgins 

Chairman 

Board of Appeals 




CHELMSFORD PLANNING BOARD 

(L to R) Thomas E. Firth, Jr.; Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 
Chairman; Ann H. McCarthy; Charles A. Parlee; Paul F. 
Bartel, Clerk (Missing from photo: Carolyn J. Fenn, Vice 
Chairman; Eugene E. Gilet) 



83 



PLANNING BOARD 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. Chairman Ann H. McCarthy 

CarolynJ. Fenn, Vice Chairman Eugene E. Gilet 

Paul F. Bartel, Clerk Charles A. Parlee 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr. Judith E. Carter, Recording Clerk 

Due to the new Zoning By-laws passed at the 1977 An- 
nual Town Meeting and the revised Subdivision Rules 
and Regulations adopted in April, the Planning Board 
has spent much time during the past year working with 
applicants on their plans for Subdivision or Site Plan Ap- 
proval. 

Approval was granted to two large subdivisions— 18 
lots on Wiggin Street, off North Road, and 16 lots in 
Chapel Hill Estates, at the end of Cambridge and Mt. 
Auburn Streets. Two small subdivisions were also approv- 
ed, and the Board approved 29 plans under Subdivision 
Control Law Not Required. 

Under the Site Plan Review process, approval was 
granted to a 135-unit motel at Parlmont Plaza, 176 con- 
dominium units on Littleton Road, a third condominium 
type office building at Village Square, and 7 other 
industrial-warehouse buildings in various sections of the 
town. At the present time, the Site Plan Review process is 
required for any building containing over 3,000 square 
feet, although the Board is considering raising the size of 
the buildings requiring Site Plan Approval. 

The Board accepted with regret the resignation of 
former Chairman A. Robert Raab at the end of May, and 
wishes to acknowledge publicly the many contributions 
made by Mr. Raab, who moved out of town. Mr. Charles 
Parlee was appointed to finish Mr. Raab's term. At that 
time the Board re-organized for the coming year, with 
the following elected: Henrick R. Johnson, Jr., Chair- 
man; Carolyn J. Fenn, Vice Chairman; Paul F. Bartel, 
Clerk; Eugene E. Gilet, representative to the Northern 
Middlesex Area Planning Commission; and Ann H. Mc- 
Carthy, representative to the Capital Planning and 
Budgeting Committee. Board members were also ap- 
pointed to serve on other Town Committees: Mrs. Fenn 
on the HUD Flood Insurance Committee, Mrs. McCarthy 
on the Citizens' Advisory Committee to the Chelmsford 
Housing Authority, and Mr. Bartel to the Vinal Square 
Development Project Committee. 



The Board held several public hearings prior to the 
Annual Town Meeting on re-zoning articles, and the 
following locations were adopted for re-zoning by the 
Townspeople: Archer property, Billerica Road; Hicks' 
land on Richardson Road; and the Emerson property on 
North Road. The Board also presented three articles at 
Town Meeting: Zoning Cleanup and adoption of Chapter 
808, Major Business Complexes, and a new Sign By-law, 
which created the formation of a Sign Advisory Commit- 
tee. Another public hearing was held in the fall for Mr. 
Hicks to use the land on Richardson Road for 72 con- 
dominium units, rather than the apartment complex 
presented at the Annual Town Meeting, and this was ap- 
proved at the November Special Town Meeting. The 
Board also worked closely with its consultant, Philip B. 



Herr, the Board of Selectmen and the Historic District 
Commission in drafting a Preservation Restriction on the 
Emerson property. 

Plans for 1979 include having a new zoning and street 
map produced, incorporating the aerial maps of the 
Town. This new map should be of benefit to all Boards 
and Departments throughout the Town, as well as the 
residents of the Town. The Board hopes to have this new 
map ready for presentation to the Townspeople at the 
April, 1979 Annual Town Meeting. 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 

Chairman 

Chelmsford Planning Board 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES 

Adams Library, Boston, Road, Chelmsford Center 
Anna C. MacKay Memorial Library 
Newfield Street, North Chelmsford 

Library Trustees 

James Geary, Chairman Howard K. Moore 
Elizabeth McCarthy Dennis McHugh 

Roger Welch * David Kelch 

*(appointed to replace Mary Claire Phelan) 

The Carriage House renovation began in the fall of 
1978, and is scheduled for completion early next year. 
The multi-purpose meeting facility, capable of seating 
fifty people, and complete with kitchen facilities is being 
financed with Trust funds, contributions from the 
Friends of the Library, and donations from the com- 
munity solicited by the Carriage House Committee. 
Nashoba Valley Technical High School students are sup- 
plying the labor. Money raising projects conducted by the 
Carriage House Committee have invluded a lawn sale and 
the raffle of a watercolor of Adams Library by William 
Hynes, donated by Representative Bruce Freeman. 

For six months, the library had the services of two video 
artists-in-residence, Fred Simon and Karen Simon-Peter- 
sen. A project of the Massachusetts Arts and Humanities 
Foundation, the video project emphasized free workshops 
in the use of 1/2 inch video equipment and the creation 
of a locally produced video tape. More than 100 people 
learned how to use the 1/2 inch portapak equipment, 
and were certified, enabling them to check out the video 
equipment for home use. The $5,900 worth of video 
equipment purchased for the program, was federally 
funded with Library Service and Construction Act, Title 
I funds through the Massachusetts Bureau of Library Ex- 
tension. An outgrowth of the video program was an 
"Adams Library Independednt Video Competition" 
which offered 4 prizes of $50 each: 1 $50 award to a local 
resident (Chelmsford, Billerica, Lowell, Wilmington, 
Tyngsboro, Westford) and 3 $50 awards to Massachu- 
setts residents. Fred Barzyk, WGBH-TV producer/direc- 
tor and a pioneer of video art in the early 1960's judged 
the tapes and awarded three of the four $50 prize monies. 
Designed to encourage use of library's video equipment 
and to publicize our video program state-wide, the com- 



84 



petition drew more than 20 entries. 

Several outstanding projects and programs were com- 
pleted this year. The Friends of the Library contributed 
immeasurably to the library's development with the pur- 
chase of a new 144 drawer card catalog and a Gestaphont 
labeling machine which completes equipment necessary 
for the library's Graphic Arts Department. In this depart- 
ment, graphic arts services to community organizations 
increased dramatically, making volunteers necessary. 
The 5th edition of our Handbook of Chelmsford 
Organizations and a fully illustrated 1979 Calendar of 
Events given away by the Children's department at both 
Adams and MacKay were produced on the library's 
graphic arts equipment. Children's programs were high- 
lighted by the ever-popular Summer Reading Club which 
attracted more than 600 participants, the first annual pet 
show which was video-taped and can be viewed in our 
Fine Arts Department, and the "Little Red Wagon" pre- 
sentations sponsored by the Friends of the Library. For 
the first time, library personnel and Friends of the 
Library staffed a brightly bannered booth at the town's 
annual 4th of July Celebration; although rain cut short 
our stay, people were able to see themselves on TV, via 
the library's video equipment, and purchase "book 
worms" created by the Friends. 

Personnel changes have been significant. David Pan- 
ciera, Director since 1972, left in September to assume 
the Directorship of the Westerly Public Library, Wester- 
ly, Rhode Island. Under his leaderhip, the library realiz- 
ed increased in the collection, the physical space, and 
staff. Formerly Assistant Director since January, I assum- 
ed the position of Director and William Edge, Jr., 
formerly Branch Librarian, Westfield Athenaeum be- 
came Assistant Director. Together we hope to increase 
services to the community, reorganize budget priorities, 
and plan for expansion of physical facilities. 

As in the past few years, the library continues to show 
an increased circulation and of the 39 libraries in our 
population group, Chelmsford has the third most cost- 
effective library. In conclusion, I would like to acknow- 
ledge the faithful support of our community including 
library users, volunteers, Friends of the Library, staff and 
Trustees. 

Statistical Report 

Monies deposited with the Town Treasurer $17,379.07 
Circulation .262,702 

Cards Issued 2-^to fl,006 8 

Employees (full time including CETA) 1 5 

Employees (Part time) 19 

Department Heads: 

Goldie Creamer (MacKay Branch) 

Lillian Storey (Circulation) 

Bea Beaubien (Children's House) 

Linda Webb (Art & Music) 

Joan Allard (Reference) 

Marion Lord (Technical Services) 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Ann E. Gallmeyer 
Director 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 

Members Cemetery Superintendent 

Everett V. Olsen, Chairman George E. Baxendale 

Arthur J. Colmer 
Gerald L. Hardy 

To: The Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford 

Gentlemen: 

The Cemetery Commission of the Town of Chelms- 
ford is pleased to report on some of their ac- 
complishments during the past year, 1978. 

One of the most important accomplishments has been 
the micro filming of vital cemetery records. In prior years 
all cemetery records relating to burials, sale of cemetery 
lots and other related financial and vital statistical 
records have been kept in looseleaf books or in separate 
files in the office of the Superintendent. The very nature 
of the cemetery building and the files in it have provided 
only minimal protection against theft, vandalism, fire or 
other means of destruction. Now that these records have 
been microfilmed the microfilm record is kept in a bank 
vault in a safe deposit box. It is now comforting to know 
that these Town records are safe and exist as a second 
means of providing this vital information. 

Other accomplishments, which are every bit as impor- 
tant to the Cemetery Department as the foregoing, are 
these: 

a. —The West Chelmsford Cemetery has five roadways 
hottopped and the cemetery fence has been newly 
painted by the staff. 

b. —The West Chelmsford Cemetery has an additional 
acre of land developed, by the Cemetery department 
staff, into new gravesites. 

c. — The South Chelmsford fencing has been painted 
by the staff. 

d.— The Riverside Cemetery required placement of a 
large granite column and name cap following an auto- 
mobile accident that upset this gateway piece. At the 
same time repair work was accomplished on the granite 
wall adjacent to the column which was also damaged in 
the accident. The Commissioners have filed a claim for 
insurance reimbursement which claim has not yet been 
settled. 

e. — The Fairview Cemetery granite wall was repaired 
in 1978 also. In addition, the Superintendent and his 
staff have converted three additional acres in Fairview 
Cemetery into grave sites and more than 25 burials have 
already taken place in this new section. This is a most at- 
tractive addition and it will fill the demand for burial lots 
in this particular cemetery. 

f . — In the Pine Ridge Cemetery it has been necessary 
to reinstall wrought iron fencing on more than one occa- 
sion because automobile accidents have knocked the fen- 



85 



cing over. In these cases motorists have left without repor- 
ting the accidents. 

g. — The Pine Ridge Cemetery was the focal point for 
vandalism and damage to grave markers — many of them 
large and expensive. 

Over twenty' monuments were overturned and trees in 
the cemetery were uprooted. 

The Commission takes this occasion to express their 
thanks and appreciation to the Luz Memorial works and 
to the Colmer Monument Works for their speedy action 
in resetting all of the monuments — in one day — without 
charge to any of the lot owners or to the Town, without 
this generous help the job would have required several 
days to be finished and at a considerable cost. 

It is especially important too, at this juncture, to ex- 
press the Cemetery Commissioner's thanks to the Police 
Department, the Fire Department and to the several Ad- 
ministrative Departments in the Town for the excellent 
cooperation and assistance with this and the many other 
difficult situations requiring the cooperation of all of- 
ficials and employees. 

h.— The Cemetery Commission published a notice in 
1978 of intent to increase the cost of Gemetery Lots. 
Following this notice the Commission did vote to increase 
the rates to be charged. The new schedule of rates, now 
in effect, are listed below: — 

FEATURED SECTION 

4 and 8 graves only 

4 grave Lot-$600- Lot $200- P/C $400 

8 grave Lot-$1,200- Lot $400.00 P/C $800.00 

MONUMENT GRAVES 

$150 per grave- Must buy two graves to have monu- 
ment privileges 

4 GRAVE LOTS 

Pine Ridge, Hart Pond, Fairview and W. Chelmsford 
$600.00 - Lot $200.00 - P/C $400.00 

FLUSH MARKER GRAVES 

$100 per grave - Lot $40.00 - P/C $60 
Monument Grave - $150 - Lot $50 - P/C $100 

During the past year the Cemetery Superintendent and 
the staff were responsible for 98 burials. 

The Cemetery Commissioners as well as the Superin- 
tendent and the staff, take this occasion to express ap- 
preciation and thanks to the many Town Departments, 
officals and employees who have given the cooperation 
and help needed to make our Cemetery Department 
function smoothly and efficiently. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Chelmsford Cemetery Commission 

Everett V. Olsen, Chairman 

Arthur J. Colmer 

Gerald L. Hardy 



PARK COMMISSION 

Park Superintendent - Donald P. Gray 

The Park Commissioners reappointed Donald Gray as 
Park Superintendent and elected Bradford Emerson as 
Chairman at the annual organizational meeting. 

A new 1978 Chevrolet 3/4 ton truck was purchased by 
the voters for the department. 

The flagpole on the North Common had to be 
repaired and reset, as it had deterioriated badly at the 
base and the top. The annual maintenance of all 
flagpoles was carried out. 

The Park Department continues to maintain the 
Recreation areas, such as the ball fields, ice skating at 
Roberts Field, and Tot Lot. 

The new field at the High School was limed, fertilized, 
and seeded after the Army left. 

We would like to thank all Town Departments and 
Garden Clubs for their continued cooperation and 
assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Bradford O. Emerson, Chairman 

Arthur L. Bennett 

Joan Schenk 



RECREATION COMMISSION 

The Chelmsford Recreation Commission consists of a 
maximum of 9 appointed volunteers. The Board of 
Selectmen, on an annual basis, may re-appoint present 
members. However, any citizen wishing to be considered 
can do so by submitting a written request for considera- 
tion. The Commission is appointed by the Selectmen, 
and it is responsible for the administration of the budget 
which it submits to the voters of this Town at the Annual 
Meeting. This body is truly an independent body of 
volunteers, dedicated to the execution of the Town's 
recreational needs and to its long range fiscal and 
management goals. 

Most of the budget goes directly to programming. An 
equal amount of money is raised by the organizations 
which are Town supported. These supported organiza- 
tions contribute nearly 50,000 hours of their personal 
time, their automobiles for transportation and their own 
personal finances when they hold cook-outs or team par- 
ties at the end of the year. The approximate $100,000 
support of the Town is less than a third of the entire cost 
when considering the total Community responsibility 
shown by these volunteer citizens. 

The administration of these programs, plus the 
maintenance of fields, buildings and equipment, is done 
through the Recreation Commission. Some capital 



86 



outlays plus some salaries are required for those programs 
solely sponsored by the Town. The conversion of the old 
East School into a community complex is administered by 
CETA personnel and operated at a modest cost to the 
Town. Fortunately, the cost of CETA personnel is provid- 
ed through a Government program. The escallation in 
the utilization of this complex helps to bring in revenue 
which has off-set some of the operational costs to date. 

With over 4,000 registered youths in the recreational 
programs in Chelmsford, it is fair to say that interests are 
high, the quality is good, the facilities are good and pro- 
blems are comparably few. 

With the most rapid rise of interest in the Soccer Pro- 
gram it has become a prime requisite that the Recreation 
Commission secure new fields for Soccer. Where possible, 
we have endeavored to design these fields for both Soccer 
and Football. Through the cooperation of the School 
Building Committee, the School Board, the Fire Depart- 
ment, the North and the Center Water Districts, the 
Police Department, the Highway Department, the Fort 
Devens Army Corp of Engineers and a volunteer group of 
citizens, it has been possible to initiate a long range field- 
development program that will create a centralized 
Football-Soccer Complex in the Harrington-High School 
open fields closest to Route 3. 

The Town is indeed fortunate to have such a dedicated 
Community responsible for the recreational enjoyment of 
more than 50% of our eligible youth. It is a cooperative 
venture as it is most difficult to have such a successful 
program without the coordination of a central agency, 
such as the Chelmsford Recreation Commission, plus all 
of the interested Community participants. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Paul Murphy, Chairman 

Joan Murray, Vice Chairperson 

Robert Charpentier 

Harry Ayotte 

Jack Bilodeau 

Bette Ressel 

Bruce MacDonald 

James Crocker, Director 

Evelyn Newman, Administrative Assistant 

YOUTH CENTER 

The 1978-1979 year at the Youth Center has been filled 
with some triumphs and difficult times. The Board of 
Selectmen unanimously defined space in McFarlin School 
as the permanent Youth Center for our community. The 
Advisory Committee and staff cheered. Our program of 
youth development started in 1 972 through the Jaycees 
and other interested town groups had finally grown to 
have office space in the community. The Youth at the 
Center together with the staff and the Advisory Commit- 
tee painted the Center to give rise to an appearance of a 
Youth Center rather than of a school. 

Jim Woodman resigned on September 8. Jim's success 
as Youth Center Coordinator will long be remembered in 



Chelmsford. He has worked constructively with many 
town groups to help the Center. Most especially, his warm 
supportive approach to the young people of our com- 
munity will, through the successful development of them 
to adulthood, attest to his success. The town lost a very 
productive and resourceful person when Jim resigned to 
return to graduate school. 

The interview process resulted in an exciting replace- 
ment. Peter Saulis became Youth Center Coordinator. 
Peter has graduated from Chelmsford High School and 
Fitchburg State College. It was a delight for the Advisory 
Committee to make the offer to one of our own. 

The winter period brought us to a new area of success. 
The Center opened its doors during the late afternoon 
hours. This opening in February attracted a new larger 
number of persons. Arts and Craft, plant workshop and 
new gymnastic equipment were well used during the first 
week of operation. 

Throughout the year attendance increased. Specialty 
gymnastic programs and disco dance training has at- 
tracted many new members. The system of transporta- 
tion through use of the senior citizens shuttle bus has also 
been a benefit. 

Fund raising activity has increased to allow a stable 
budget projection for the coming year. The Advisory 
Committee has exercised careful budget control to in- 
crease programs, hours of operation with a zero in- 
cremental effect on the tax rate. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. Weinert, Chairman 
Advisory Committee 

Ernie Brown 

Phyllis Dougherty 

Jay Finnegan 

Robert Acheson 

Jan Greeno 

Judy Harrison 

Wendell Luke 

Trudy Wall 

Joanne Weinert 

Ronald Cannistraro 

SHARE INCORPORATED 

SHARE'S total income, January 1 — December 31, 
1977, is $667,842. During this same twelve-month 
period, SHARE actually expended $53,946.04 in services 
to the residents of Chelmsford ($47,739.86 direct; 
$6,206.18 indirect). That is 7.1% ($47,739.86 divided by 
$667,842) of SHARE'S income went to Chelmsford. 
Chelmsford contributed $23,747, which is 3.5% of 
SHARE'S income. For each dollar Chelmsford con- 
tributed, citizens received $2.27 in services. 

Service Delivery Summary: 

During 1978, 207 Chelmsford residents received 



87 



SHARE services in either treatment or education pro- 
grams. 

The Medication Clinic (methadone) has seen 2 clients 
from Chelmsford for a total of 83 weeks. 

The Morningstar Counseling Program has counseled 
93 youths and their families from Chelmsford for a total 
of 1530 counseling weeks. 

The Emergency Shelter Program has housed 10 indi- 
vidual adolescents from Chelmsford for 85 days of shelter 
care. 

Residents from Chelmsford have been seen at Central 
Intake for counseling, 12 individuals from Chelmsford 
have been seen this year. 

Other SHARE services provided to residents of Chelms- 
ford include 200 hours in-school counseling and training 
groups in Chelmsford High School and Junior High 
Schools. In-school counseling involves direct counseling 
of 45 adolescents who are usually referred by school 
department personnel. Many of these students have a 
problem with substance abuse, as well as other adoles- 
cent adjustment issues. 

SHARE, Incorporated is a multi-modality, drug treat- 
ment and rehabilitation program serving the Greater 
Lowell area. Eligibility requirements vary with each divi- 
sion. For more information, call the Central Intake Unit 
at 459-2306. 

Central Intake Unit — The Central Intake Unit (CIU) 
is a place where a person with an immediate crisis or con- 
tinuing problem can be seen quickly and without red 
tape. The client is personally evaluated to determine his 
or her treatment needs and then referred to an ap- 
propriate facility, whether it be one of SHARE'S pro- 
grams or an appropriate community agency. In addition, 
CIU offers short-term, outpatient counseling and crisis 
intervention. The Central Intake Unit is located at 660 
Middlesex Street, Lowell. CIU is open from 9:00 a.m. to 
5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, plus evening hours if 
necessary. For an appointment call Joan Hyde, Ph.D., at 
459-2306. 

Anabasis House — Anabasis House is a residential, 
therapeutic community for men and women who have 
been drug abusers with related emotional and/or legal 
problems. Residents live in a structured environment in 
which therapy includes group and individual counseling, 
an educational/vocaational component, recreation, 
medical care, and household tasks. Anabasis House is 
located at 21 Branch Street, Lowell. 

Morningstar— Morningstar is the division of SHARE 
which deals with the treatment of adolescents and their 
families, as well as young adults. Referrals from our cat- 
chment area come to Morningstar from a variety of 
sources: the courts, schools, mental health clinics, 
hospitals, parents, and self- referrals. Components of 
Morningstar include individual, group, and family 
counseling, as well as community and school consulta- 



tion. Morningstar is located at 150 Middlesex Street, 
Lowell, although counselors see most young people at 
schools or in their own community. 

Share Temporary Shelter (STS) — STS is a short-term 
shelter facility for adolescents. The target age group is 
the 13 and 16 year old who is having problems and needs 
a "cooling off place to stay. Young people are usually 
referred by an agency or the police. Some are also offered 
shelter when there is a question of child abuse. The 
Shelter is located at 206 Rogers Street, Lowell. 

Medication Clinic — is an outpatient adult program 
for opiate addicted individuals who need detoxification 
and psychotherapy. Admission requirements are strict 
and comply with Federal protocol. The Clinic is located 
at 660 Middlesex Street, Lowell. 

Consultation Training & Evaluation Team — pro- 
vides community consultation and training to schools, 
agencies, and community groups. The team also provides 
a comprehensive battery of psychological tests. The team 
includes Dr. Gerald Margolis, Alan M. Smith, Sc.D., 
Patricia A. Morin, ACSW, and Dr. Robert Caine. 

I trust this information will be of value to you in assess- 
ing SHARE'S contribution to needed services to the 
citizens of Chelmsford. I would be pleased to answer any 
questions you might have regarding this report or any of 
SHARE'S programs. Please do not hesitate to call me. 

With best regards, 

Douglas R. Murray 
Executive Director 

ESTIMATED COSTS TO PROVIDE SERVICES 
TO THE TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

January 1, 1978— December 31, 1978 



Medication Clinic (2 clients) 




84 client weeks x $40.84/week 


$ 3,430.56 


Emergency Shelter (10 clients) 




85 client days x $32.73/day 


2,781.20 


Central Intake Unit 




12 Intake Evaluations 




x $82.32/client 


987.84 


Morningstar Counseling (93 clients) 




1530 client weeks x $24.13/week 


36,918.90 


Other Morningstar Services 




In-school Counseling. 203.0 hours 




Health Education Committee 7.0 hours 




Jr. High Group 1.0 hours 




Chelmsford Clergy 22.0 hours 




Youth/Teen Center 1.0 hours 




Drug Committee 1.0 hours 




Police Department 2.0 hours 




Total 237.0 hours 




237 hours x $15.28/hour 


3,621.36 


Sub-Total 


47,739.86 


Ancillary and indirect costs, including 




Central Administration, Businesess 




Management, Clinical Supervision, and 




Program Evaluation (13% of above 




total) 


6,206.18 


GRAND TOTAL 


53,946.04 


Amount paid to SHARE, Inc. for 




12 months 


23,736.96 



For every dollar Chelmsford paid SHARE, it has received $2.27 in si 
vices. 



88 



PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

To: The Honorable Board of Selectmen 
From: William Shedd, Plumbing Inspector 

This being the third year that the Plumbing Inspector 
has been transferred from the Board of Health to the 
Building Inspector's office, continues to make an efficient 
operation. 

The Plumbing Inspector, Gas Inspector, Wire Inspec- 
tor and Building Inspector's work is very closely related; 
therefore the expenses are reduced considerably. 

I thank all the Inspectors, the townspeople and other 
departments for their cooperation. 

For the year 1978 there were 211 plumbing permits 
issued to do plumbing work. Of this number, 84 were for 
Hot Water Tanks, 12 were for Renovations, 115 were for 
New Construction. It took 230 plumbing inspections to 
complete the work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William Shedd 
Plumbing Inspector 

WIRE INSPECTOR 

To: The Honorable Board of Selectmen 
From: Harold M. Tucke, Jr., Wire Inspector 

1978 has been a year of increasing work load for the 
Wire Inspector. The new State Code law requiring smoke 
detectors in all new residential homes and other buildings 
require extra inspections to ascertain that they are pro- 
perly installed and that there is one detector for each 
1200 sq. ft. of living or using area. 

Pools require ground fault interrupters and all outside 
wiring assuring the safety of users. 

I have to work very closely with Mass. Electric Co. They 
are required to notify me of all meter changes. 

I must inspect all electrical signs, which require an 
electrical permit. 

The burning of the Fiske House was investigated exten- 
sively by both local and state authorities and by me to 
determine the cause of the fire, which was ruled not to be 
electrical. 

I am on call seven days a week, twenty four hours a 
day, in case of emergency; such as fire, flooding etc. 

There were 455 applications for wire permits issued in 
1978. The majority of these require several inspections. 



Residential Building 

Fire Alarms 

Service chgs., dryers, pools, relocation 

water service change-grounding, fire 

damage, etc. 



255 
190 



485 



Inspections made for wire permits 

Type of Inspections: 

Commercial & Industrial Buildings 



1160 

No. 
230 



Respectfully submitted, 

Harold M. Tucke, Jr. 
Wire Inspector 

GAS INSPECTOR 

To: The Honorable Board of Selectmen 
From: Neal Stanley, Gas Inspector 

1978 again has proven to be an eventful year with all 
the inspectors in the same office. My position as Gas In- 
spector has been made more efficient which means a 
more efficient department for the Town of Chelmsford. 
Added State requirements have increased my duties. 

I wish to thank all the people and departments that 
have cooperated so much to make this department what 
it is. 

There were 185 permits issued in 1978. 

There were 350 inspections made by the Gas 
Inspector. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Neal Stanley 
Gas Inspector 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 
Gentlemen: 

As Sealer of Weights and Measures for the town of 
Chelmsford, I wish to submit my report for the year 1978. 

In performing my duty, I have sealed the following: 



216 Gasoline Meters 

2 Scales 5,000-10,000 pounds 
21 Scales- 100 to 5,000 pounds 
44 Scales — more than 10 less than 100 pounds 
36 Scales— 10 pounds or less 
117 Avoirdupois Weights 
12 Apothecary Weights 
1 Fabric Measuring Device 



Monies received from seals, the sum of $1,052.81, has 
been turned over to the Town Treasurer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Anthony C. Ferreira 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 



89 



ANIMAL INSPECTORS REPORT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen: 

The following is the animal inspectors report for the 
year 1978. 



Number of dog bites 
Number of cattle inspected 
Number of horses inspected 
Number of swine inspected 
Number of sheep inspected 



69 
164 

55 
355 

12 

Respectfully submitted, 
Martin A. Gruber DVM 



DOG OFFICER 

The following is a report of my services as Dog Officer 
for the year 1978. 



Stray Dogs sold to individuals 
Stray dogs sent to Medical Schools 
Stray dogs disposed of 



Total stray dogs picked up 

Complaints investigated 

Miscellaneous calls 

Dead Animals picked up 

Miles traveled 

Lost dogs returned to owners 



53 

153 

6 



212 

697 

2,879 

331 

20,842 

92 



Respectfully submitted 

Frank Wojtas 
Dog Officer 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Members 



John McCormack 
Edward Duffy 
Donald House 



John Balco 

Judith Hass 

David Merrill 



Frank Siraco 



The past year was an extremely eventful one for our 
commission. We started the year with these prime objec- 
tives: 

(1) Acquire more town-owned conservation 
land and develop existing properties to in- 
crease public use. 

(2) Improve our Wetlands administration 
skills. 

(3) Promote inter-board cooperation on con- 
servation matters. 



(4) Expand on our working relationships with 
neighboring commissions. 

(5) Upgrade public knowledge and awareness 
of the importance of wetlands protection. 

We are proud to report the following progress on each 
of these objectives. 

Land Acquisition/Reservation Development 

Through town meeting approval, we added 36 acres to 
our previous total of 298 acres of conservation lands. This 
additional acreage cost $81,500 to purchase, but the net 
incremental cost to the town was zero (0) — because 50% 
was paid by our conservation fund and 50% was reim- 
bursed by the state self-help program. 

Our reservation development efforts centered on sign 
construction, trail marking, and overall clean up. A 
nature trail has been identified and labeled at the Wright 
Reservation and a guide booklet has been published. 
These booklets are available at the Town Hall and the 
public libraries. The trail marking, clean up, and sign 
construction work at the reservations were guided by our 
CETA employee, Richard Guaraldi. Jeff Ross, an Eagle 
Scout Candidate from Troup 77, directed the construc- 
tion of the Wright Reservation picnic area, trail mark- 
ings and clean up projects. 

Wetlands Administration 

The duties associated with administering the Wetlands 
Protection Act (WPA) easily absorbs most of the time and 
effort of our seven (7) members. During the year, we 
made two (2) great strides towards increasing our 
technical administration capabilities. 

First, we had a ground water study completed that 
identified the location of ground water suplies, and in- 
cluded recommendations on how this supply could be 
protected from pollution. This study and its conclusions 
are extremely useful because Chelmsford relies totally on 
ground water for its drinking water supply. We shared 
this study information with the Planning Board and the 
Water Districts. 

Secondly, we contracted engineering services to clearly 
define the boundaries of all our wetlands. Boundary 
definitions were generated based on the state statute and 
legal definition as to what constitutes a wetland. All of 
our wetlands were delineated on the Town's new two-foot 
contour maps. As a result of this project, we are in a 
much stronger position to determine both the accurate 
location and the value of the Town's wetlands. On 
December 12 we conducted a public presentation of the 
wetlands mapping project and we distributed copies of 
the new wetlands map to the Planning Board, Building 
Inspector, Board of Health, Appeals Board and Select- 



Inter-Board Cooperation 

Much closer cooperation now exists between our com- 
mission and the Planning, Health, Appeals, Building In- 



90 



spector, and Selectmen personnel. Although more work 
in this direction is always necessary, communications that 
already existed have improved, and new communication 
channels have, or are being established. We realize that 
the prime benefactor of inter-board cooperation are the 
Town people, and we pledge to accelerate our interfacing 
activities in 1979. 

Neighboring Commissions 

Recent wetlands incidents in the Littleton Road, Sleigh 
Road and Hart Pond areas have been nutually addressed 
by the Westford and Chelmsford Conservation Commis- 
sions. We have both concluded that public and wetlands 
protection can best bve served by our joint efforts. We 
will continue and expand this process with other neigh- 
boring commissions in 1979. 

Public Awareness of Wetlands 

Educating the public as to what the wetlands protec- 
tion act is all about continues to be one of our top priority 
goals. Proress towards this goal is slow because awareness 
requires understanding, which in turn requires education 
etc. One step we took during 1978 to help general under- 
standing was the publication of a wetlands brochure for 
the layman. Copies of this brochure are available at the 
libraries and offices of the Town Clerk and Building In- 
spector. 

Wetlands Protection Act Hearings 

There have been six hearings held under the Wetlands 
Protection Act (Chapter 131, Section 40, Massachusetts 
General Laws) for 1978. Conditions have been issued on 
all cases. There was one appeal by Parlmont Realty 
Trust. The final decision is state pending. Many outstan- 
ding cases have been or are being pushed by Town 
Counsel in hopes of resolving them. New Guidelines have 
been issued to assist applicants in their applications under 
the act. 

In closing our prime objectives in 1979 will be the same 
as those in 1978. We plan to build on the base established 
in 1978 and we are confident the final results will show 
that the public is better served. 



TREE DEPARTMENT 

This year the department has been continuing with its 
safety pruning, removal of broken limbs from previous 
storm damage, removing lower limbs too low for safe 
travel. 

A hearing was held for the removal of trees for work on 
Route 27 in South Chelmsford with a decision to leave the 
trees. 

A minimum of young trees were planted with hopes to 
plant more, if money can be made available. 

We plan to continue with safety and preventive 
maintenance our priorities, as well as taking care of the 



many calls throughout the year. We are here to serve you 
the best we can. 

Thanks to all town departments for their continued 
cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Donald P. Gray 
Tree Warden 



INSECT PEST CONTROL DEPARTMENT 

As in the past, this department has used its budget for 
the removal of dead and diseased trees. Most of the work 
is done during the winter months when the town has the 
use of the contractors at a considerable savings. 

The list of trees to be removed continues to grow as we 
continually view the town roads with safety our number 
one priority. The trees are topped first, at a later date the 
main butt is removed and when deemed necessary the 
stump is ground below finish grade. All the above is done 
with special equipment and well trained personnel of 
local contractors. 

We try to locate as many of the problems as we can and 
with your help our job can be done even better. If you see 
a problem don't hesitate to call as we are here to serve 
you. 

I would like to thank everyone for their assistance 
throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Donald P. Gray 

TOWN AIDE 

Throughout 1978, the Town Aide Department focused 
its efforts toward assisting the Townspeople by encourag- 
ing participating in all available anti-poverty programs. 
In addition to seeking increased awareness and participa- 
tion in programs such as: Vocational Advancement 
through Skill Training, Neighborhood Youth Corps, 
HeadStart, Family Day Care, Foster Grandparent Pro- 
gram, Retired Senior Volunteer Program, Senior Com- 
panion Program and the Section 8 Rental Subsidy Pro- 
gram, increased demand for assistance with energy 
related problems resulted in emphasis on the Winteriza- 
tion Program as well as the Emergency Energy Assist- 
ance Program. 

The demand for Winterization services (caulking, in- 
sulation, weatherstripping) did create a longer waiting 
period for applicants, but, many homes were completed 
during 1978. Emergency Energy Assistance funds were 
made available in the spring and assisted approximately 
44 Chelmsford residents in meeting their fuel needs. 

In June, this office relocated with the Council on Aging 
office to the Senior Citizen Drop In Center on Mill Road. 



91 



It is apparent that a greater proportion of time is being 
spent in providing assistance to the increasing elderly 
population of Chelmsford. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kathleen M. Robinson 
Town Aide 



CHELMSFORD COUNCIL ON AGING 

The Chelmsford Council on Aging had another busy 
year in 1978, attempting to expand services to assist the 
increasing number of older residents. The following 
report outlines the services which were available during 
1978. 

Senior Citizen Drop In Center 

With the Assistance of the Board of Selectmen and the 
Building Committee the Chelmsford Senior Citizen Drop 
In Center finally opened its doors in June 1978. The 
Council wishes to pay special tribute to the late Mr. Ed- 
ward Hood, Building Committee member, who devoted 
so many hours and much interest in the project. We will 
miss him. 

Since June, many seniors have taken advantage of the 
opportunity to be out of their homes and socialize. The 
Center is open Monday through Friday, from 8:30 am 
until 5:00 pm. Arts and Crafts are held on Monday morn- 
ings and exercise and group dancing in the afternoon. 
Bingo is enjoyed on Wednesdays and cards on Thurs- 
days. Special parties have been held on Fridays. In addi- 
tion to these scheduled activities, the Center has a televi- 
sion, stereo and library which has been furnished with 
donated books and magazines. The Council on Aging of- 
fice has also been relocated to the Center, offering in for- 
mation and assistance to the elderly. 

Transportation 

During 1978, the Council on Aging Van traveled 
21,278 miles and transported 3,329 persons to their 
destinations. 

Nutrition 

The Elderly Lunch Program continued in 1978 to offer 
nutritious luncheons three days a week at a cost of 50 c 
per meal. The program moved to the McCarthy Junior 
High in September and has adapted very successfully. In- 
creased demand for delivered meals has resulted in a 
tremendous response from volunteers who currently 
deliver 50 meals daily to home bound elderly in all sec- 
tions of Town. Volunteers also continued to deliver meals 
to the Chelmsford Arms during 1978. In total over 20,000 
meals were served in 1978. 

Health Maintenance 

The Elderly Health Clinics are sponsored by Elder Ser- 
vices of the Merrimack Valley in cooperation with the 
Lowell Visiting Nurse Association. Clinics are conducted 



beginning at 1:30 pm until 4:00 pm, according to the 
following schedule: First Wednesday — Drop In Center; 
Second Wednesday — North Congregational Church; 
Third Wednesday — Chelmsford Arms; Fourth Wednes- 
day—St. Mary's Church. 

Special clinics were offered in 1978. In September, a 
Diabetes Screening Clinic was held which serviced over 50 
persons. The annual Influenza Immunization Clinic was 
held in November and immunized over 300 persons, as 
well as administering approximately 60 doses of the new 
pneumonia vaccine. 



Elderly Services of the Merrimack Valley 

Through appropriation at the 1978 Annual Town 
Meeting the Town of Chelmsford continued as a sponsor- 
ing member of Elder Services, entitling Chelmsford's 
elderly to supportive services. Many elderly residents 
received the homemaker, home health aide, nursing and 
chore services available through the agency, enabling 
these persons to remain in their own homes. 



In addition, Elder Services employs Senior Aides who 
perform outreach and provide assistance to the elderly. 
In July 1978, a third Senior Aide was assigned to Chelms- 
ford and helped to reach the 300 clients visited by the 
Aides each month. 



Recreation 

In addition to the recreational activities held at the 
Drop In Center, the Council helped to sponsor various 
trips planned by the Senior Citizens Club. Senior citizens 
traveled to such places as Hampton Beach, Long Wharf, 
Deerfield Fair, Mohawk Trail, Rockport, Chateau de 
Ville, and the Manchester Mall in 1978. 

1978 Census 

During 1978, the Council on Aging compiled the 
following statistics relative to the 'over sixty' population of 
Chelmsford: 

60-70 years — 1,688 persons, 70-80 years — 996 persons, 
80-90 years — 538 persons, 90-100 years — 82 persons, over 
100 years — 6 persons. There is a total of 3,309 residents 
who are over 60 years of age, comprising approximately 
10% of the total Town population. 

Newsletter 

The year 1978 also saw the beginning of a monthly 
newsletter for the Town's senior citizens entitled 'The 
Chelmsford Senior Citizen Messenger'. This publication 
contains information about important programs and ser- 
vices for the elderly and is made possible through adver- 
tisements by local businesses. The 'Messenger' appears to 
be well received by residents and the Council is very 
grateful to the advertisers. 



92 



Looking toward 1979, the Council on Aging hopes to 
continue to expand services at the Drop In Center in 
order to reach as many persons as possible. The Council 
will also attempt to implement a 'respite care' program in 



cooperation with the Westford Council on Aging. Final- 
ly, the Council would like to thank the Townspeople and 
Town Officials for their continued support of its efforts to 
assist the elderly of Chelmsford. 



SENIOR CITIZENS DROP-IN CENTER 




BEFORE 




AFTER 



Respectfully submitted, 

Louise M. Bishop, Chairman 

Lillian Gould 

William Marson 

Mary McAuliffe 

Kathleen Robinson, Secretary 

H. Chadbourne Ward 

Christina Ahern 

Gula Boyce, Vice Chairman 

Clarence Dane 

Edna Nelson, Treasurer 

Sara Dunigan 



93 



HOME RULE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

The Home Rule Advisory Committee was founded by 
the March 1963 Town Meeting to examine state-local 
relations and report on such to the Selectmen. The seven 
members are appointed by the Selectmen. In addition to 
informing the Selectmen on state-local issues, the com- 
mittee has taken on other advisory tasks at the request of 
the Selectmen, and also advises other town official bodies 
of pending or newly passed state legislation as it may im- 
pact their official responsibilities. Copies of new legisla- 
tion were distributed to several town bodies during the 
year. Close liasion is maintained via correspondence and 
personal contacts with our state senator and representa- 
tive when specific matters deem it adviseable. 

Among the projects worked on or completed during 
the year are the following: 

1. Studied and prepared a proposed new by-law 
dealing with the recall of town elected officials for 
due-cause. This by-law to be presented to the 
voters at the 1979 Spring Town Meeting. 

2. Submitted and compiled a citizen's attitude 
survey on town meeting attendance. 

3. Proposed that a set of across-the-street banners be 
purchased for the Center and North Square an- 
nouncing town meeting. 

4. Reissued the Appointed Committee Handbook. 

5. Instituted studies on traffic commission and the 
possibility of zero quorum at town meeting. 

6. Revised and reissued the formal committee goals 
and operating procedures as follows: 

a. Alert affected town bodies about pending 
legislation on Home Rule; 

b. Make recommendations to affected town 
bodies as to response to pending legislation; 

c. Suggest Home Rule Legislation to be filed 
on behalf of the town; 

e. Conduct special studies as deemed advise- 
able on behalf of good town government. 

f. Initiate ideas and make recommendations to 
town bodies aimed at improving Home Rule; 

g. Review existing by-laws and town procedures 
and recommend changes to the town in the 
form of amended or proposed by-laws for 
town meetings' 

h. Coordinate as necessary with state and other 
public officials to support favorable and op- 
pose adverse Home Rule Legislation. 

7. Supported House Bill 4145 dealing with supplying 
the towns with total personal and business income 
data. 

8. Instituted the writing of a Town Meeting Citizens 
Guide. 

9. Submitted referendum questions for Spring Town 
Meeting. 

10. Studies of the town by-laws and other matters of 
importance to the town are continuing. 



I extend my thanks to all the members who par- 
ticipated and carried the work load this year and to the 
Selectmen for their support. In particular, this past year 
we have appreciated the close liaison and letters and visits 
with State Senator C. Amick and State Representative B. 
Freeman. 

The Home Rule Advisory Committee thanks the 
Chelmsford School Committee and School Administra- 
tion for making facilities available for some of our 
meetings. 

Jean-Paul J. Gravell 
Chairman 



ENVIRONMENTAL 
ADVISORY COUNCIL 

This report covers the CY78 activities of the Environ- 
mental Advisory Council. The council members are: 

Mrs. Ina Greenblatt 
Mrs. Diane Lewis 
Mrs. (Dr.) Ethel Kamien 
Mr. Gene Roberts 
Mr. Michael Zymaris 
Mr. Donald Kaless 
Mrs. Mary Wadman 
Mr. Gerald Locker 
Mr. Richard Coddling* 

During the CY78 season, Mrs. Ina Greenblatt with- 
drew as Chairwoman of the EAC and Mr. Gene Roberts 
and Mr. Mike Zymaris were elected to replace Mrs. 
Greenblatt. Mr. Roberts and Mr. Zymaris served as Co- 
Chairmen and Mrs. Greenblatt remained on the council 
as a member of the EAC. 

There was one major but recurring issue on which 
members of the council met and submitted a decision to 
the Selectmen. This was an EAC recommendation not to 
conduct a mosquito aerial spray program in the town. 
The town meeting disregarded the advice of the council 
and despite the potential ecological dangers, aerial spray- 
ing was conducted regardless. The council also met infor- 
mally to discuss the Chelmsford recycling program and 
reaffirmed their belief in continuing the program, even if 
it meant reducing its scope. Despite the work the council 
had done to establish the recycling program initially, the 
Selectmen discontinued the program without seeking the 
advice of the EAC. In addition, the council members in 
conjunction with consultant Dick Coddling prepared a 
written opinion favorably endorsing an area-wide refuse 
recycling proposal. The program would create reuseable 
metals and glass in an incineration process with the elec- 
tricity produced sold to electrical companies. The EAC 
opinion was presented to the Selectmen and was 
apparently favorably received. 

As a direct result of the experiences of last year as rein- 
forced with the futilities of previous years, the EAC 
members state their intention to resign as a group from 
the position of environmental advisors to the Board of 
Selectmen and to the Town of Chelmsford. Therefore, 



94 



this letter should be considered as both a report of 1978 
EAC activities and an instrument of resignation. In the 
last year, especially, it has become most obvious to coun- 
cil members that they are no longer serving a useful pur- 
pose and only seem to be an impediment in the path of 
the town's intentions. Despite our attempts to be totally 
responsive to the situation, our objectivity and 
pragmatism are usually overcome by townspeople driven 
by emotions of the moment. To those personnel on the 
council who are truly specialists in their field and also to 
those of us whose sole claim is an interest in maintaining 
their town's environment, it is truly disappointing. 
Although council members cannot object to adversity 
based upon logical reasoning, our judgements continue 
to be overtaken by easier and convenient non-solutions. 
We feel we can be heard better as individuals rather than 
as the keepers of the town's environmental conscience. 

Gene Roberts 
Michael Zymaris 

Co-Chairmen 
Environmental Advisory Council 

NORTHERN MIDDLESEX AREA 
COMMISSION 

The Northern Middlesex Area Commission serves the 
nine communities in the Northern Middlesex Area 
(Billerica, Chelmsford, Dracut, Dunstable, Lowell, Pep- 
perell, Tewksbury, Tyngsborough and Westford) as their 
comprehensive regional planning agency. The NMAC 
Commissioners, numbering three from each community, 
(one member of the planning board, on selectmen/city 
councillor, and one alternate) provide local representa- 
tion and policy guidance to the Commission's staff of pro- 
fessional planners and technicians. 

The Commission meets monthly (usually on the third 
Wednesday evening) at its offices, located at 144 Mer- 
rimack Street, Lowell (telephone 454-8021). The public 
is welcomed and invited to attend. 

Major planning efforts and progress in the past year in- 
clude: 

Housing 

During 1978 NMAC's Areawide Housing Opportunity 
Plan (AHOP) was adopted by the Commission and en- 
dorsed by eight of NMAC communities. The AHOP 
documents housing needs for the area by community and 
is currently being used by communities in the preparation 
of housing assistance plans. In addition to the extensive 
technical assistance provided to local housing authorities 
and other local officials, NMAC continued to gather the 
data necessary to satisfy the many requests for current 
housing information coming to the agency from public 
and private sources. An advisory committee consisting of 
local housing authority members, builders, tenants, 
bankers and minorities was consulted throughout the 
drafting of the Areawide Housing Opportunity Plan. 



Economic Development 

During 1978 the Commission updated its Overall 
Economic Development Plan for the Northern Middlesex 
Area. Through its Overall Economic Development Com- 
mittee, NMAC hopes to secure official designation as an 
Economic Development District. Obtaining this designa- 
tion would place the region in a competitively advan- 
tageous position for receiving Federal financial assistance 
for economic development projects. 

Transportation 

In cooperation with the State's Department of Public 
Works, the Lowell Regional Transit Authority and the 
Commonwealth's Executive Office of Transportation and 
Construction, NMAC continued to conduct a vigorous, 
comprehensive transportation planning program for the 
region. The final draft of NMAC's Comprehensive 
Transportation Plan, detailing long and short range im- 
provements to the area's transpomtation system, was com- 
pleted this year. This Plan will provide a continuing 
framework for future transportation planning and im- 
plementation efforts in the Northern Middlesex Area. 

With respect to the region's highway system, the Com- 
mission's major efforts included completing the Billerica 
Center Bypass Corridor Planning Study, substantial pro- 
gress on the Merrimack River Crossing Corridor Planning 
Study, and designing a model of existing transportation 
system which will facilitate forecasting the impact of 
future alterations in transportation activities within the 
region. 

The Commission also completed a number of transit 
studies in addition to continuing planning assistance to 
the Lowell Regional Transit Authority. Commission staff 
completed reports on a Transit System Inventory, outlin- 
ing ridership, revenue, expense figures and the like for 
area bus operators, and on a Service Permits and Licenses 
Study, detailing route permits currently held by local bus 
operators. Work continued on a paratransit study, deal- 
ing with methods to provide additional transit services to 
the transit dependent elderly and handicapped and in- 
dicates the best methods of coordinating these services. 

Environment 

During 1978 the Commission continued to be involved 
in a number of program areas designed to improve the 
region's physical and manmade environment. As in re- 
cent years, the major focus in this area remained the 
completion of a wastewater management study for the 
Lowell metropolitan area under Section 208 of the 1972 
Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments. 
Within the past year, technical work on that study was 
completed and staff is in the process of writing the final 
plan alternatives. Related efforts within the past year in 
this area also include the completion of water quality 
assessments for Pepperell and Dunstable, the undertak- 
ing of a Merrimack River Watershed Greenbelt Program 
in cooperation with the Merrimack Valley Planning 
Commission and the Merrimack River Watershed 
Association, sponsorship of a seminar with the two groups 
on land use development and its relation to septic tank 
regulations, and continued assistance on Nutting Lake 



95 



restoration. 

Outside of the water quality improvements efforts, the 
Commission also concerned itself with other efforts 
designed to improve the region's environment. The Com- 
mission received a grant from the Massachusetts 
Historical Commission for a study of the preservation of 
open space and recreational development of the Mid- 
dlesex Canal. In addition, work neared completion on a 
historical preservation study of the region, detailing ar- 
chitectural styles and variations in each community and 
making recommendations for the preservation of signifi- 
cant sites. 

Comprehensive Planning 

Because NMAC is a "comprehensive" regional plann- 
ing agency, it is the Commission's overall concern and 
responsibility to assure that its plans are based upon full 
recognition of all relevant significant social, economic, 
and physical considerations. A practical expression of the 
Commission's recognition of this responsibility is the fact 
that NMAC serves as the region's Federally-designated 
"A-95 Clearinghouse". In that capacity, the Commission 
reviews requests for Federal funding of projects in the 
areato insure consistency with areawide plans and goals. 
The result of this process is that by providing an advisory 
opinion on such grant applications, which are forwarded 
to the various Federal funding agencies, these requests for 
Federal assistance are further strengthened. In a similar 
manner, NMAC also reviews projects subject to the 
Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act. 

The Commission's involvement in the Center Develop- 
ment Program also reflects NMAC's comprehensive 
regional planning concerns. Acting in cooperation with 
local boards and citizen groups, NMAC applied a screen- 
ing process to identify older centers targeted for 
revitalization and programs are underway in Westford, 
Chelmsford and Dracut. Under a Farmers Home Ad- 
ministration special program, the centers of Pepperell 
and Tyngsborough have also been singled out for 
revitalization. 

Technical Assistance 

Technical assistance in relating regional planning to 
local needs and current issues is a major objective of the 
Commission and extensive assistance in preparing by law 

revisions, documenting Federal and State grant applica- 
tions, and advising on numerous problems from traffic to 
personnel management is offered by the Commission. 

Budget 

During the fiscal year which ended June 30, 1978, the 
Commission expended $403,184. The local share raised 
by assessments on the nine member communities was 
$60,000. The balance was contributed by the following 
sources: the Federal Urban Mass Transportation Ad- 
ministration; the Environmental Protection Agency; the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development; the 
Bureau of the Census; the Commonwealth's Department 
of Public Works (with the Federal Highway Administra- 
tion); the Massachusetts Historical Commission; the 
Department of Environmental Quality Engineering; the 



Department of Community Affairs (with the U.S. Civil 
Service Commission); the Billerica Conservation Commis- 
sion (with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency); and 
the Lowell CETA Consortium. 

The budget for fiscal year 1979 is $354,898, of which 
$60,000 was raised from local assessments. 

Additional details on all aspects of the Commission are 
available on request to the Commission at 144 Merrimack 
Street, Lowell, MA 01852, telephone 454-8021. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHELMSFORD NMAC MEMBERS 

Eugene E. Gilet 

Arnold Lovering 

Daniel Burke 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority's most recent ac- 
tivity is the proposed rehabilitation of McFarlin School 
for elderly housing. The present goal for this program is 
to provide fifty-six units. 

Participation in this accelerated housing program con- 
ducted by the Department of Community Affairs began 
with our application in April. In August we received 
notification from the Department of their approval and 
Phase I funds in the amount of $25,000, part one of a 
commitment to fund $1,920,000. Part two, the develop- 
ment funds, is dependent upon satisfactory completion of 
Phase I within the accelerated time schedule outlined by 
the Department. 

Through the dedication of the board members, the in- 
valuable support of the Board of Selectmen, and the 
cooperation of the School Committee and the Youth 
Center Advisory Board we have arrived at the end of 
Phase I in a time acceptable to Department of Communi- 
ty Affairs. 

An Architect's Competition sanctioned by the 
American Institute of Architects, judged jointly by three 
non-competing architects, one sociologist, and two Hous- 
ing Authority members, with forty-three architects sub- 
mitting was held in October. After one and a half days of 
deliberation the jury chose eight schemes, three of which 
were chosen winners of the competition. These three were 
interviewed by the Housing Authority and one, Unihab, 
Inc., was chosen to be the architect for the project. 

We are presently waiting for the transfer of the site and 
the building at a Special Town Meeting to complete 
Phase I and obtain the funding to proceed into Phase II 
— Development. 

Our three on-going programs; Chelmsford Arms, the 
Community Residence in North Chelmsford, and the Ch. 
707 "Scattered Site" program combined with the fifty-six 
new units will provide one hundred thirty-seven units of 
State-aided Low Cost Housing. This year we were suc- 
cessful in our application to HUD for Section 8 federal 
funds and were awarded twenty-five units of Section 8 
housing, bringing our total number of units for low- 
income housing in Chelmsford to one hundred sixty-two. 



96 



A second application for federal funding of twenty-five 
more Section 8 units has been submitted. We look for- 
ward to approval of this in our effort to achieve our long 
range goal of providing low-income housing for families 
and the elderly through a well rounded program accep- 
table to all of the residents of Chelmsford. 

During this year Claude A. Harvey ended his participa- 
tion on the board. He served with the added respon- 
sibilities of being the Chairman for eight years, from the 
first year of our organization as a Housing Authority. We 
would like to thank him for his interest, dedication and 
guidance. 

We also thank the people of the Town and the Town 
Officials for their support and cooperation. Our meetings 
are held the first Tuesday of the month at 7:30 pm in the 
Community Building of Chelmsford Arms at 1 Smith 
Street and all meetings are open to the public. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ruth K. Delaney, Chairman 

Robert Hughes 

Richard L. Monahan 

Robert A. Sheridan 

Pamela Turnbull 



CHELMSFORD SEWER COMMISSION 

To be submitted for Annual Town Report 

1978 was a progressive year for The Sewer Commission 
as we received tentative state approval of our step I town- 
wide sewer system plan. Final approval is contingent on 
the state's approval of The City of Lowell's plan to tie 
Chelmsford into the Duck Island Sewage' Treatment 
Plant. We are currently in the process of compiling data 
for our application for reimbursement for expenditures 
dating back to the creation of The Chelmsford Sewer 
Committee. Once final approval of Step I is received, we 
will begin Step II which is the detailed engineerng plans. 
Chelmsford has been placed on the state's priority list for 
funding of our Step II. 

Receiving state approval on Step I took many years of 
filing reports, modifying the initial proposal to meet state 
and federal requirements and meeting with a variety of 
state agencies which regulate these projects. 

In the meantime, The Chelmsford Sewer Commission 
is doing everything possible in the preparation to go forth 
on Step II as soon as final approval of Step I is granted. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Dennis J. Ready, Clerk 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John P. Richardson, Chairman 

Richard O. Lahue, Sr., Vice Chairman 

Bertha E. Trubey, Clerk 



Jane B. Drury 
Emile Dumont 



John D. Hamilton 
George A. Parkhurst 



Member leaving during the year: 
John C. Alden 

During the year the Historical Commission has been 
active in adding to the inventory of town historical assets. 
To date, 85 Buildings, 6 monuments, 4 burial grounds 
and 2 archeological sites, which are of historical, ar- 
chitectural or archeological significance to the communi- 
ty, have been identified and documented. Information 
from the inventory is available to all individuals who are 
concerned with growth and change in the town. 

The Chelmsford Center Historic District was voted 
eligible for nomination to the National Register of 
Historic Places by the State Review Board on November 
1 1 , 1978. The nomination form will now be submitted to 
the National Park Service for their determination. The 
Center Historic District encompasses 36 properties that 
merit preservation and protection. Preparation of the re- 
quired application forms required a major effort by 
members of the commission, due to the research and 
volumous descriptive material involved. 

The damage to the Fiske House, one of the town's most 
prominent historic properties, is a matter of great con- 
cern to the Historical Commission. All possible assistance 
should be made available to the owner. It is hoped that 
restoration will be completed without undo delay. 

The second grade students again visited the 1802 
Schoolhouse as a part of their studies on early New 
England life. The program is under the direction of Sally 
Madison, Coordinator of Social Studies. 

Several additional historic site markers were installed 
during the year. The Commission believes that these 
historic markers promote historic awareness and increase 
public appreciation of the community. 

The Historical Commission would like to acknowledge 
the efforts of the Four Seasons Garden Club in maintain- 
ing the Byam Match Factory Marker site in South 
Chelmsford and the Park and Cemetary Department's 
maintenance of the 1802 Schoolhouse and Middlesex 
Canal Toll House sites. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John P. Richardson, 
Chairman 



CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 



Walter R 
Dana Caffelle 
Raymond Day 



Hedlund, Chairman 

James K. Gifford 
Charles Marderosian 



During the year 1978, as in past years the Town Cele- 
brations Committee, has been active in making prepara- 
tions for the annual Fourth of July Celebration in 
Chelmsford. The Chelmsford Minutemen Coordinating 



97 



Committee, must once again be complimented on their 
planning and administration of the 1978 Celebration, the 
Country Fair on the common, the Band Concert, Square 
Dancing, attended by many hundreds the evening of July 
3rd. The Grand Parade on the Fourth attended by 
several hundreds despite the heavy showers. 

Many thanks to the Chelmsford Art Society for the Art 
Festival, the Recreation Commission for the Road Races, 
Chelmsford Lodge of Elks for the gigantic fireworks 
display. 

The Committee wishes to thank personnel of the 
Police, Fire, Public Works and Park Departments for 
their assistance and cooperation during the 1978 celebra- 
tion, also special thanks to the members of the 
Chelmsford Auxiliary Police Unit. 

Preparations are now underway for the 1979 Fourth of 
July Celebration. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund, Chairman 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

Members 

Paul J. Canniff, D.M.D., Chairman 
John P. Richardson, Vice Chairman 
Richard O. Lahue, Sr. 
Robert LaPorte, Jr. 
Jeanne Parlee 

Alternates 
Harold J. Davis 
Charles Watt 

The Historic District Commission met at the 1802 
School House on the first and third Monday of each 
month. A summary of our decisions follows: 

Fiske House Inc. —Construction of retaining walls 
Central Square appropriate exterior signs, 

walkways, lighting, rubbish con- 
tainer and other necessary land- 
scaping Public Hearing held 
April 23, 1978 -Certificate of Ap- 
propriateness approved. 

— Construction of sidewalk and re- 
taining wall on Westford Street at 
Bridge Street — Public Hearing 
waived — Certificate approved 
April3, 1978. 

— Construction of an addition to 
existing building and im- 
provements to existing building 
and landscaping — Public Hearing 
held March 6, 1978 -Certificate 
approved April 3, 1978. 

— Resurfacing driveway area with 
asphalt Public Hearing waived — 
Certificate approved April 20, 
1978. 



Fiske House Inc. 
Central Square 



Board of Selectmen 



N. E. Telephone 
20 North Road 



George R. Brown 
15-17 Westford St. 



Donald S. Millard 
28 Westford Street 



Paul Archer 
9 Billerica Rd. 



— Installation of six-room com- 
bination air conditioning-heating 
units to be covered by aluminum 
siding of like material, color and 
texture as currently exist on facade 
of the building Public Hearing 
waived — Certificate approved May 
2, 1978. 

— Changes to building and grounds 
addition of back porch, paved turn 
around and picket fence Public 
Hearing held June 5, 1978 — Certi- 
ficate approved. 

— Brick planter changed to field- 
stone planter — Public Hearing 
waived — Certificate approved Oc- 
tober 16, 1978. 

Richard B. Codling —Addition of entrance doorway 
26 Worthen Street and steps on southside of residence 
with brick walkway Public Hear- 
ing waived — Certificate Approved 
November 6, 1978. 

Fiske House Inc. —Changes to barn and office. 

Central Square Certificate approved, but withheld 

because conditions on prior certi- 
ficates issued unfulfilled. 

During the year 1978, the Historic District Commission 
has continued its efforts to preserve and protect the 
Historic District of Chelmsford. We are proud that this 
area remains as it is, a unique showcase of the town. We 
will attempt to preserve this in the coming years. 

The Commission will continue its efforts along this line 
and endeavor to straigten out some problems that have 
arisen this past year. One of the prime concerns of this 
Commission this year will be the restoration of the Fiske 
House. 

Paul J. Canniff, D.M.D. 
Chairman 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

Herbert F. Bennett, Chairman 

Edward J. Hilliard Carl A. Olsson 

Mary E. St.Hilaire, Ex-Officio 

Michael J. Devine (Deceased) 

Tribute to 
Michael J. Devine, Registrar 

On September 26, 1978, Registrar Michael J. Devine 
passed away. He served on the Board from 1973-1978. 
Mike was a special type of man, he had great qualities, he 
was strong willed, compassionate, fair minded, willing 
worker, gentle, kind, and mostly he was a caring man. 



Mike will be missed, but not forgotten. He will be part 
of our memories forever. 



98 



Voting Strength as of December 31, 1978 



Prec. 


Dem 


Rep. 


Ind. 


Total 


1 


465 


353 


707 


1525 


2 


488 


189 


434 


111 


3 


665 


247 


913 


1825 


4 


374 


91 


232 


697 


5 


527 


336 


1060 


1923 


6 


575 


267 


638 


1480 


7 


392 


222 


532 


1146 


8 


352 


254 


571 


1177 


9 


417 


132 


591 


1140 


10 


637 


260 


967 


1864 


11 


443 


240 


467 


1150 


12 


541 


234 


824 


1599 


Total 


5877 


2825 


7936 


16638 



VARNEY PLAYGROUND/ 
EDWARDS BEACH 



sure the safety of the many children who use the park and 
beach. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Varney Playground/ Edwards Beach Commission 

Harry Ayotte, Chairman 

Robert McManimon 

Bernard Battle 



CABLE TELEVISION 
ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

The CATV Comm. is closely following the develop- 
ments in the Lowell area. It is currently anticipated that 
no changes in Chelmsford status will occur in the next few 
years. 

R.E. Arcand, Chairman 



This past year was both a hectic and rewarding one for 
the Commission. Hectic in the sense that the facilities 
were being used to their potential, and rewarding 
because of the obvious enjoyment of those who used 
them. 

Once again, the field was used extensively by various 
baseball leagues and the children in the Summer Recrea- 
tion Program. 



After a dry spell of some eight years, Edwards Beach 
was reopened. The Commissioners are most pleased with 
the reception it received by the townspeople.. In the spr- 
ing, over one thousand cubic yards of sand was placed in 
the water and on the beach in an effort to create a safer 
area. As the summer progressed, quite a bit of sand was 
washed out. This coming spring, more sand will be 
brought in with the hope that the beach will finally be 
levelled. 



The Varney Commission would like to publicly thank 
the Recreation Commission for the excellent job they did 
this summer in staffing the beach with water safety in- 
structors and lifeguards, both during the swimming in- 
struction period and the remainder of the day. Many 
children benefitted by their instruction and vigilance. 



The Commission also wishes to thank the North 
Chelmsford Water District Commission and the Park 
Department's Don Gray for their invaluable assistance 
this summer. 



The summer of 1979 hopefully will see an upgrading of 
the sanitary and fieldhouse facilities at the Park. 



The Commission, in closing, would like to remind all 
who use the facilities, to drive and park with care to en- 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 

To: The Honorable Board of Selectmen 

From: Peter J. McHugh, Jr., Inspector of Buildings 

The year 1978 was more eventful and active than the 
previous year of 1977 with Chapter 802 of the State 
Building Code's amendments, plus the addition of Archi- 
tectural Barrier Board, the Energy Program, Woodburn- 
ing stoves, Lighting Power Audit, etc. 

The reorganization of all the Inspectors in one office is 
still working out very well. The office space is still a 
limited question with the State filing system, which is 
mandatory. It is our hope that adequate solutions to the 
problem can be and will be forthcoming. 

The need for help still exists. Court cases have increas- 
ed, the work load has increased. 

As the Inspector of Buildings, I thank all those Town 
Departments that contribute and assist me throughout 
the year so readily. I also thank the townspeople of 
Chelmsford for their past cooperation and look forward 
to serving them in the coming year. 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 

Peter J. McHugh, Jr. 



CETA 

Laura Sievert 



Senior Clerk 

Catherine Curran 



The following is a report of the Building Inspection 
Dept. for the year 1978. 

There were 380 Building Permits issued 

231 Occupancy Permits issued 

Certificates of Inspection issued 
302 Yard Sale Permits issued 

Business Establishments inspected 



99 



THE TYPES OF BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED 
ARE LISTED BELOW: 

No. Type issued Est. Value 

102 Dwellings valued at $5,523,300.00 

33 Wood Burning Stoves valued at 9 , 800 . 00 

122 Additions valued at 557,617.00 

23 Remodelings valued at 77,195.00 

45 Swimming Pools valued at 166,333.00 

15 Utility Sheds valued at 11,595.00 

12 Signs valued at 9,675.00 

2 Storage Buildings valued at 145,000.00 

— Siding valued at — 

5 Commercial remodeling valued at 91,500.00 

— Poultry Shed valued at 

1 Greenhouses valued at 1,000.00 

2 Barns valued at 3,575.00 

— Stables valued at 

2 Fireplaces valued at 1,900.00 

7 Garages (unattached) 38,200.00 

7 Demolitions valued at 1,500.00 

2 Foundations valued at 3,400.00 



380 Permits with estimated value of $6,641,590.00 

Amount of Salary appropriation for 
Zoning Bylaw Officer and Inspector of 
Buildings -July 1, 1978 -June 30, 1979 17,777.00 

Amount received by the Town of 
Chelmsford for Building Permits: 19,717.00 

Amount received by the Town of 
Chelmsford for Occupancy Permits: 425.00 

Amount received by the Town of 
Chelmsford for Certificate of Inspections: 1,425.00 

Amount received by the Town of 
Chelmsford for Yard Sale Permits: 1,510.00 

BUILDING DEPARTMENT 
Total Fees Received -1978 Total 

Inspector of Buildings —Building Permits $19,717.00 

— Certificates of Ins. 1,425.00 

— Certificates of Occupancy 425.00 
-Yard Sales 1,510.00 



Plumbing Inspector 



Wire Inspector 
Gas Inspector 



Plumbing Permits 
Hot Water Tanks 



Wire Permits 
Gas Permits 



$23,077.00 

1,600.00 
420.00 

2,020.00 
5,620.00 
1,866.00 



Total $32,583.00 

Total Building Departments Budget 1978-1979 

Building Inspector's Department $31 ,457.00 

Gas Piping & Fixture Department $ 5,224.00 

Wire Inspector's Department $18,127.00 

Total $54,808.00 

Total Cost to Operate Building Dept. $22,225.00 

THE BUILDING DEPARTMENT 
BUDGET BREAK DOWN 

Building Inspector's Department: 



Office Expense 

Out of Town Expense 

Senior Clerk's Salary 



Wire Inspector's Department: 
Wire Inspector's Salary 
Transportation Expense 
Office Expense 
Out of Town Expense 



Gas Piping & Fixture Department: 
Gas Inspector's Salary 
Transportation Expense 
Office Expense 
Out of Town Expense 



Duties added through State Mandated Duties: 
A.B.A. (Architectural Barrier Board) 
Heat Energy 
Article Two, State Sanitary Code 

Respectfully submitted, 

Peter J. McHugh, Jr. 
Inspector of Buildings 



2,496.00 


275.00 


9,398.00 


$31,457.00 


$15,312.00 


1,500.00 


1,040.00 


275.00 


$18,127.00 


$ 3,750.00 


750.00 


624.00 


100.00 


$ 5,224.00 



TOWN TREASURER 



Bal.Julyl, 1977 
Receipts to June 30, 1978 



Paid out on Warrants 
Balance June 30, 1978 



$ 2,350,377.49 
34,183,294.57 

$36,533,672.06 
33,824,125.28 

2,709,506.78 



Building Inspector's Salary 
Transportation Expense 



$17,777.00 
1,511.00 



TAX COLLECTOR 
Balances June 30, 1978 

Levy of 1973: 

Personal Property 

Excise 

Farm Excise 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1974: 

Personal Property 

Excise 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1975: 

Personal Property 

Excise 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1976: 

Personal Property 

Excise 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1977: 

Personal Property 



f 424.60 

46,420.38 

562.00 

00.00 

617.08 

33,190.14 

00.00 

1,557.06 

59,206.37 

00.00 

8,542.70 

59,271.40 

6,681.81 

9,420.14 



100 



Excise 
Real Estate 
Levy of 1978: 

Personal Property 

Excise 

Real Estate 



01,730.50 


Overdrawn Overlay Accounts 


41,236.96 


Levy of 1975-1974 
Levy of 1974-1975 


19,891.79 


Levy of 1975-1976 
Levy of 1976-1977 


61,924.72 


Levy of 1977-1978 



494,611.55 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

BALANCE SHEET— JUNE 30, 1978 
REVENUE ACCOUNTS 

ASSETS 



Underestimated Assessments: 
County Hospital 
County Tax 
State Recreation Areas 
Air Pollution 

Revenue: 

Appropriations voted for 
Fiscal 1979 



5,214.56 




6,507.26 




16,963.53 




6,378.45 




63,624.71 


98,686.51 


9,333.59 




44,833.36 




4,324.01 




24.86 


158,515.82 




22,792,161.37 


$28,641,875.70 







Cash: 












General: 






LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 




In Banks 




$2,135,616.12 


Temporary Loans: 






Federal Revenue Sharing: 






In Anticipation of Serial Loans 




$ 34,214.00 


In Banks 


298,283.77 










Invested 


200,000.00 


498.283.77 


Payroll Deductions: 




174,221.31 


Antirecession Fiscal Assistance: 






Gurantee Deposits: 






In Banks 




17,373.79 


Planning Board 




4,560.00 


Accounts Receivable: 






Agency: 






Taxes: 






State: Registry Fees 


150.00 




Levy of 1973 Personal Property 


424.60 




State: Entertainment Licenses 


100.00 




Levy of 1974 Personal Property 


617.08 




County: Sale of Dpgs 


18.00 




Levy of 1975 Personal Property 


1,557.06 




County: Dog Licenses 


1,135.15 




Real Estate 


691.33 




Recording Fees 


5.00 




Levy of 1976 Personal Property 


8,542.70 




Water District Liens 


1,872.80 


3,280.95 


Real Estate 


6,681.81 




Tailings: 

Unclaimed Checks 






Levy of 1977 Personal Property 


9,420.14 






6,076.03 


Real Estate 


41,236.96 










Levy of 1978 Personal Property 


19,891.79 




Trust and Investment Fund Income: 






Real Estate 


494,611.55 


583,675.02 


Conservation -Wright 


3,047.08 




Motor Vehicle Excise: 






Library-Carriage House Ren. Fund 


14,334.66 


17,381.74 


Levy of 1978 


46,260.38 




Federal Grants: 






Levy of 1974 


33,190.14 




Public Law 92-512 R.S. 


498,283.77 




Levy of 1975 


59,206.37 




Public Law 94-369 A. FA. 


17,373.79 




Levy of 1976 


59,271.40 




H.U.D. Community Devel. Program 


2,743.63 




Levy of 1977 


101,730.50 




School: 






Levy of 1978 


161,924.72 


461,583.51 


Title I PL 89-10 
Tutle II PL 89-10 


4,387.03 
.70 




Farm Excise: 






Title IV PL 93-380 


38,660.03 




Levy of 1978 




562.00 


Title VI PL 89-313 


285.80 




Special Taxes: 






Gifted & Talented PL 93-380 


234.20 




Taxes in Litigation 




9,066.90 


PL 81-874 


313,054.44 


875,023.39 


Tax Titles & Possessions: 






Revolving Funds: 






Tax Titles 


29,214.18 




School Lunch 


16.600.64 




Tax Possessions 


13,297.83 


42.512.01 


School Athletics 


3.289.76 










Merrimack Education Center 


11,581.38 


31,471.78 


Departmental: 












Off Duty Work Details 


3,967.06 




Sale of Real Estate 




5,177.02 


Public Buildings 
Highway 


225.00 
470.00 




Sale of Cemetery Lots 




9,627.50 


Cemetery 


3,456.50 


8,118.56 


Loans Authorized & Unissued 




1.570,786.00 


Water Districts: 






Appropriation Balance Forward 




748.376.41 


Liens Added to Taxes: 












Levy of 1977 


657.70 




Special Project Balance Forward 




383.381.75 


Levy of 1978 


1,215.10 


1,872.80 


Appropriations Authorized From: 






Aid to Highways: 






Federal Revenue Sharing Funds 






State 




120,300.38 


Public Law 92-512: 
Sidewalks 


8,817.70 




Loans Authorized: 






Sidewalks-Acton Road 


40,749.50 




Sewer 


1,200,000.00 




Audit 


20,000.00 




High School 


100,000.00 










Crystal Lake 


305,000.00 


1,605,000.00 


Stabilization Fund: 


on nnn o/i 





Transfers Authorized: 
Federal Revenue 
Sharing Funds 
Stabilization Fund 
Conservation Fund 



69,567.20 
27,979.94 
11,000.00 108,547.14 



Highway Dept. Equipment 27.979.94 

Conservation Fund: 

Consultant 11,000.00 

Receipts Reserved for Appropriation: 

State Aid to Libraries 11,906.38 



101 



Highways-Chapter 825 
Highways-Chapter 1140 
Crystal Lake Reimbursement 

Reserve Fund Overlay Surplus: 

Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
Farm Excise 
Special Tax 
Tax Title & Possessions 
Departmental 



37.709.16 

694.77 

20.130.17 



461,583.51 

562.00 

9,066.90 

42,512.01 

8,118.56 



70,440.48 
76,763.45 



Aid To Highways 

Overestimated Assessments: 
Special Education Chap. 766 

Surplus Revenue: 

Appropriation Control 
Fiscal 1979: 

Revenue 

Transfers 



10,015.00 
1,078,227.02 



22,151,411.37 

640,750.00 22,792,161.37 



$28,641,875.70 



DEBT STATEMENT 



High School Issue #2 
South Row School 
1972 High School #1 
1972 High School #2 
Junior High School 
Westland-Harrington Schools 
Byam School 
Crystal Lake Restoration 



Interest 


Outstanding 


Payments 


Outstanding 


Principal 


Interest 


Rate 


6-30-77 


1978 


6-30-78 


Due 1979 


Due 1979 


3.20 


85,000. 


85,000. 


00. 


00. 


00. 


3.50 


180,00. 


45,000. 


135,000. 


45,000. 


4,725. 


4.90 


960,000. 


240,000. 


720,000. 


240,000. 


35,280. 


4.40 


5,100,000. 


850,000. 


5,250,000. 


850,000. 


168,300. 


3.25 


745,000. 


110,000. 


635,000. 


110,000. 


20,638. 


4.30 


1.660,000. 


160,000. 


1,500,000. 


160,000. 


64,500. 


6.00 


1,340,000. 


105,000. 


1,235,000. 


105,000. 


70,950. 




00. 


100,00. 


00. 


00. 


00. 




10,070,000. 


1,695,000. 


8,475,000. 


1,510,000. 


364,393. 



TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 

Trust and Investment Funds: 
Cash and Securities: 
In Custody of Treasurer 
In Custody of Library Trustees 
In Custody of Board of Selectmen 
In Custody of Veterans Emergency 
Fund Committee 



In Custody of Treasurer: 

Geo. W. Barris-Varney Playground 
Conservation Fund 
Stabilization Fund 
Insurance Sinking Fund 
Cemetery Funds: 

Geo. W. Barris Memorial 

Perpetual Care 

Adams Emerson 

In Custody of Library Trustees: 
Library Funds: 
Amos F. Adams 
Geo. W. Barris 
Frances Clark 
Clement Fund 
Albert H. Davis 
Frederick B. Edwards 
Nathan B. Edwards 
Victor E. Edwards 
Adams Emerson 
Ora Flint 
George Memorial 
Thomas P. Proctor 
Salina Richardson 
Joseph E. Warren 
Gertrude Wright 

Cemetery Fund: Aaron George 

In Custody of Board of Selectmen: 



474.844.96 

72,922.77 

460.18 



Emma Gay-Varney Playground 

In Custody of Veterans Emergency 
Fund Committee: 
Veterans Emergency Fund 



2,585.30 


Unexpended Balance 


110,855.26 




54,701.40 


NOl 


58,211.42 


Cash-In Banks 


6,329.85 




241,559.90 




601.83 474,844.96 Apropriation Balances: 




School Construction 


20,658.73 




2,487.20 




1,228.12 




16,984.24 

795.47 

8,743.10 

800.53 


Net Funded or Fixed I 


Inside Debt Limit 
General 


2,407.01 


Outside Debt Limit 


161.78 


General 


3,771.18 




2,213.07 




8,433.45 




432.02 


Serial Loans: 


1,281.77 
657.57 


Inside Debt Limit 
General: 


1,867.53 72,922.77 Schools 



EDUCATIONAL COLLABORATIVE BOARD FUND 

Section 4-E Chapter 40, General Laws 

Cash-In Custody of Treasurer 43 

ice 

NON-REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 



43,293.16 



30,000.00 

8,445,000.00 
8,475,000.00 



102 



/VIKlf 



Outside Debt Limit 
General: 
Schools 



Council On Aging 
Town Celebration Com. 
Bicentennial Celebration Com. 
Youth Center 
Town Aide 
D.P.W. Committee 



REVENUE SHARING FUNDS P.L. 92-512 

Balance July 1, 1977 

Plus Receipts: 
Adjustment from Revenue Cash 
Entitlements: July 1, 1977/June 30, 1978 
Interest: July 1, 1977/June 30, 1978 



26,220.06 
471,660.00 

26,12.07 524,001.13 



Less Authorized Appropriations: 
Fire Department — Wages 
Police Department — Wages 
Sidewalks 

Sidewalks — Acton Road 
Audit 



Plus Funds Returned: 
Fire Department — Wages 
Police Department — Wages 

Appropriations Forwarded-Fiscal 1979: 
Sidewalks 

Sidewalks — Acton Road 
Audit 

Balance June 30, 1978 



164,498.00 
164,497.00 
10,332.70 
46,214.44 
20,000.00 



8,486.32 
58,913.18 



8,817.70 
40,749.50 
20,000.00 



69,567.20 



ANTIRECESSION FISCAL ASSISTANCE FUNDS P.L. 94-369 

Balance July 1, 1977 68,861 

Plus Receipts: 
Entitlements: July 1, 1977/June 30, 1978 
Interest: July 1, 1977/June 30, 1978 



Less Authorized Appropriations: 
Highway Dept.-Snow and Ice Removal 
Highway Dept. -Wages 
Chapter 32B Insurance 



Total General Government 

Public Safety: 
Police Department: 

Salaries 

Expense and Outlay 

Purchase Cruisers 

Mutual Aid 

Consultant 
Total Police Department 

Fire Department: 
Salaries 

Expense and Outlay 
East Station Construction 
Purchase New Pumper 

Total Fire Department 



Misc. Protection: 
Hydrant Services 
Tree Warden 
Insect Pest Control 
Building Inspector 
Wire Inspector 
Gas Inspector 
Plumbing Inspector 
Dog Officer 
Animal Inspector 
Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Civilian Defense 
Police Outside Detail 



Plus Funds Returned: 

Highway Dept. -Wages 
Balance June 30, 1978 



DISBURSEMENTS 



General Government: 
Moderator 
Selectmen 
Accounting 
Treasurer/Collector 
Assessors 
Town Clerk 
Public Buildings 
Law 

Elections 
Registrars 
Finance Committee 
Planning Board 
Board of Appeals 
Personnel Board 
Town Forest Committee 
Conservation Commission 
Historical Commission 
Historic District Com. 
Constable 
Home Rule Advisory Com. 



29,520.00 






3,760.84 


33,280.84 






102,141.96 


Sewer Commission: 
Expenses 


67,045.00 




Professional Fees 


27,339.58 




Total Sewer Commission 


7,456.34 


101,840.92 






301.04 


Highway Department: 
Administration 




17,072.75 


Engineers Fees 
Labor — Men 




17,373.79 


Utilities — Materials — Misc. 






Waste Collection 






Stabilization Fund 






Machine Hire — Other 






Snow & Ice 


1977 


1978 


Sidewalks 

Chapter 90 Maint & Construction 


300.00 


300.00 


Chapter 825 Construction 


57,485.30 


65,402.21 


Chapter 1140 Construction 


42,862.36 


48,049.29 


Purchase of Equipment 


99,403.95 


95,803.15 


Total Highway Department 


66,075.61 


68,966.52 




38,900.29 


42,880.90 


Street Lighting 


56,825.15 


26,800.95 




25,152.68 


28,003.34 




24,254,32 


6.212.56 




15,746.61 


20 705.95 




1,022.19 
15.532.38 


1,047.41 
3.210.22 


Cash & Material Grants 


Total Veterans Benefits 


4,439.30 


4,196.10 




602.86 


632.84 


Schools: 


90.00 


73.50 


School Committee 


9,001.36 


9,848.61 


Supt. Office 


1,772.57 


1,633.20 


Supervision 


290.59 


695.00 


Principals 


120.00 


72.00 


Teachers 


244.62 


426.04 


Textbooks 



13,710.20 


10,383.78 


2,993.84 


4,719.60 


1,675.58 




30,742.96 


32,214.99 


9,166.34 


9,972.22 


70.79 




520,381.85 


482,250.47 


946,386.47 


933,052.68 


86,319.31 


83,267.20 


22.756.20 


27,662.25 


1,611.65 


1,824.10 


.00 


15,000.00 


1,057,073.63 


1,060,806.23 


1,078,867.66 


1,176,474.42 


62,008.77 


80.013.53 


194,924.74 


10,606.46 


75,700.00 




1,411,501.17 


1,267,094.41 


52,640.00 


56.899.80 


18,203.92 


15,537.90 


12,467.00 


9,306.00 


21,713.674 


19,555.04 


16,777,70 


17,292.53 


5,087.78 


4,829.61 


1,375.00 


1,310.00 


14,872.72 


15,255.87 


1,100.00 


1,100.00 


2,000.00 


2,200.00 


6,129.15 


5,6388.59 


100,600.18 


85,817.24 


252,967.09 


234,742.58 


846.87 


94.58 


87,903.03 


17.10 


88,749.90 


111.68 


31,278.87 


32,600.38 


9,869.95 


9,970.64 


584,499.82 


532,511.83 


151,202.10 


205,991.05 


69,763.93 


58,605.05 


10,000.00 




3,424.45 


5,394.00 


161,679.62 


238,704.87 


28.450.84 


41,895.94 


56,926.85 


20,245.85 


10,476.03 


20,245.85 


4,159.75 


57,202.02 


27,581.00 


96,687.06 


1,149.313.21 


1,338,472.62 


68,123.56 


66,897.55 


12,775.67 


13,489.00 


88,133.56 


73,088.17 


100,908.23 


86,577.17 


25,559.79 


36,727.52 


235.903.24 


267.743.81 


267,601.54 


256,756.24 


565.625.47 


597,763.45 


7,173,337.08 


7,365,270.30 


104,473.07 


123.785.80 



103 



Library 


222,464.95 


234.330.48 


Audio Visual 


122,463.24 


103,604.19 


Guidance 


341,545.34 


346.238.49 


School Attendance 


16,791.33 


17,999.80 


Health Services 


89,176.04 


99,429.83 


Transportation 


651,021.13 


683,426.54 


Food Services 


49,551.61 


54,138.62 


Athletic Program 


120,168.31 


111,834.21 


Student Activities 


28,706.73 


26,037.46 


Custodial 


626,033.81 


649,082.86 


Utilities 


566,873.41 


581,015.54 


Maint. of Grounds 


27,280.23 


22,812.20 


Maint. of Buildings 


67,992.36 


68,812.56 


Maint. of Equipment 


55,870.21 


54.033.53 


Adult Education 


18,059.26 


20,456.66 


Civic Activities 


14,614.34 


13,114.68 


Programs W/O Schools 


7,483.15 


8,750.00 


Work Study Programs 


19,050.12 


37,723.70 


Chapter 766 


963,183.41 


908,493.65 


Total School Department 


12,380,829.17 


12,678,382.12 


School Revolving Funds: 






Cafeteria 


604,383.79 


624,680.80 


Athletics 


18,781.36 


12,514.17 


M.E.C. Funds 


908,193.54 


626,666.73 


Title I 


58,929.03 


85,545.12 


Title II 


6,377.65 




Title III 


783.35 




Title IV 


18,607.03 


73,391.27 


Title VI 




24,638.51 


Distributive Ed. 


14,882.92 


117.08 


Gifted & Talented 




4,837.30 


C.E.T.A. Projects 




1,850.29 


Total Revolving Funds 


1,630,938.67 


1,454,241.27 


Regional Vocational School 


411.427.00 


425,454.00 


School Building Committee 


219.36 




Libraries: 






Salaries 


141,352.81 


148.209.60 


Repairs & Maint. 


3,492.50 


3,494.14 


Fuel, Light & Water 


12,017.71 


12,550.79 


Books & Periodicals 


43,997.51 


50.116.11 


Other Expense 


8,017.64 


7,999.02 


Outlays 


2,392.20 


2.148.92 


Library Addition 


991.79 




Video Tape Project 




5,291.05 


Total Libraries 


212,262.16 


229,809.63 


Parks & Recreation: 






Parks 


26,745.86 


31,862.33 


Varney Playground 


5,082.98 


5,138.84 


Recreation Commission 


129,671.84 


110,723.67 


East School 


9,690.17 


7,264.28 


Recreation Facilities Planning 


5,970.00 




Park — New Equipment 


5,525.00 




Edwards Beach 




2,367.71 


Total Park & Recreation 


182,685.85 


157,356.83 






Insurance: 






Property Liability & All Types 


218,190.92 


264,291.30 


Chapter 32B 


277,160.99 


293,957.35 


Total Insurance 


495,351.91 


558,248.65 


Cemeteries: 






Salaries 


51,039.70 


58,689.52 


Internments 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


Labor For Lot Owners 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


Repairs, Expense & Outlays 


12,191.48 


13,245.55 


Restore Old Cemeteries 


783.85 


1,500.00 


Beautification 


10,537.56 


4,790.42 


Purchase New Equipment 


4,571.85 




Improv. & Devel. Fund 


1,983.00 


7,685.43 


Total Cemeteries 


87,107.44 


92,910.92 



Unclassified: 

Memorial Day 

Town Clock 

Ambulance Service 

Town & Fin Com Reports 

Unpaid Bills— Prior Years 

Regional Drug Program 

Crystal Lake Reconstruction 

Mental Health ProgTam 

Update Town History 

Elder Services of Merr. Valley 

Central Sq. — Eng. Fees 

Land Purchase — Conservation 

Water Main Instal — Garrison Rd. 

Wetlands Aerial Mapping 

Bus Trans Subsidy 

NMAC Assessment 

Glass Recycling 

Landfill Engineering Plans 

Aerial Mapping 

Survey — East School 

Survey — Ideal Ave. 

Sr. Citizen Drop-In Center 

Landfill Development 

Storm Damage 

Salt Storage Shed 

Conservation Com. —Consultant 

D. P. W. -Consultant 
Total Unclassified 

Agency, Trust & Investment: 

Fees & Licenses-State & County 

Payroll Deductions 

Retirement-Pension Expense 

State & County Assessments 

Cemetery P/C Bequests 

Tax Levy Refunds 

Performance Bonds 

Trust Funds 

Misc. Trust Funds 

Water District Liens 

Refund — Cemetery Lot Fee 

Refund — Architect Fees 
Total Agency, Trust & Investment 

Interest — Loans: 

Anticipation Loans 

Bonded Debt 
Total Interest 

Principal — Loans 

Anticipation of Revenue 
Anticipation of Bond Issue 
Maturing Bond Debt 

Total Principal 

School Construction 

Total Disbursements 
Cash Balance on Hand June 30 
Total 



General Revenue 
Taxes: 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 

Farm Animal Excise 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Tax Title Redemptions 

Lieu of Taxes — State Property 

Lieu of Taxes — Veterans Abatements 
Total Taxes 



1,500.00 


1,430.95 


513.72 


384.99 


9,999.96 


1,666.67 


6,122.98 


6,462.35 


2,556.57 


39,135.54 


23,736.96 


23,736.96 


398,317.92 


152,569.15 


8,695.00 


8,695.00 


5.00 




1,800.00 


1,800.00 


333.38 


620.92 


21,500.00 




2,314.35 




2,698.665 




27,999.96 


29,978.04 


8,592,00 


8,592.00 


611.85 




5,713.37 




13,013.00 


73,987.00 


2,000.00 




600.00 




318.85 


36,937.52 




10,280.93 




9,991.80 




40.00 




5,000.00 




12,000.00 


538,943.62 


423,309.82 


11,824.95 


21,579.70 


4,253,303.06 


4,247,437.34 


419,741.33 


425,866.97 


733,983.58 


893,356.61 


8,674.00 


13,035.00 


82.175.32 


180,538.00 


6,455.00 


3,250.00 


25,000.00 




4,837.44 


1,476.04 


12,377.03 


8,918.57 


120.00 




1,500.00 




5,559,991.71 


5,795,467.99 


18,484.35 


37,148.55 


506,562.00 


434,602.50 


525,046.35 


471,751.05 



2,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 

645,000.00 200,000.00 

2,190,000.00 1,695,000.00 



4,835,000.00 6,895,000.00 



31,708,845.87 33,824,125.28 
2,350,377.49 2,709,546.78 
34,059,223.36 36,533,672.06 



447,696.60 592,922.31 
11,781,146.59 15,185,508.90 



701.00 

1,322,929.91 

7,919.08 

4,289.04 

7,837.16 



205.50 

1,388,773.08 

12,833.69 

4,324-32 

8,862.80 



13,572,519.38 17,193,430.60 



!f 7 V 104 



Fines & Permits: 

Court Fines 

Permits, Fees & Licenses 

Alcoholic Licenses 
Total Fines & Permits 

Grants and Gifts 
County: 

Dog Fund 

Aid to Highways 
Total Grants From County 

Federal Government: 
Public Law 874 
Revenue Sharing Funds 
Antirecession Fiscal Assistance 
Comm. Devel. Program H.U.D. 
Snow Removal Reimbursement 

Total Grants From Fed'l. Government 

State: 

Aid to Education 

School Building Assistance 

School Cafeteria Aid 

Tuition & Transportation 
of State Wards 

School Transportation Aid 

Aid_Io_ Public Libraries 

Highways — Chapter 90 

Highways — Chapter 81 

Highway & Transit Development 

Local Aid Fund 

Veterans Benefits 

Conservation Grant 

Crystal Lake Reimbursement 

Governor's Safety Program 

Census 

Library — Video Tape Project 

Dept. of Elder Affairs 
School Programs: 

Title I 

Title IV 

Title VI 

Gifted & Talented 
Total Grants From State 

Individuals: 

Library — Carriage House 
Renovation Fund 
Total Gifts From Individuals 

Departmental Receipts: 
Selectmen 

Treasurer & Collector 
Town Clerk 
Assessors 

Police Department 
Police Outside Detail 
Public Buildings 
Highway 
Dog Officer 
Fire Department 
Veterans Department 
Misc. Departments 
Sale of Town Property 
Glass Recycling 

School Department: 

Cafeteria — Lunch Sales 
Tuition — Rents & Misc. 
Athletic Programs 
Educational Collaborative Fund 
M.E.C. Revolving 



1,858.55 
59,743.30 
22,570.00 



2,513.50 
77,321.10 
21,550.00 



84,171.85 101,384.60 



4,847.39 
7,524.33 



167,507.69 

433,999.00 

67,045.00 

10,000.00 



165,020.74 

471,660.00 

29,520.00 

30,000.00 

12,300.00 



678,551.69 708,500.74 



3,936,633.93 2,968.439.35 

1,082,134.56 1,006,729.44 

218,435.22 165,507.05 



422.00 


33,346.00 


409,903.00 


220,270.00 


_JHJ&L00__ 


11,905.88 


34,327.67 


23,636.62 


156,326.47 


150,291.20 


150,998.55 


148,671.59 


191,792.64 


320,561.66 


40,475.98 


43,112.28 


72,575.00 


30,000.00 


592,342.47 


61,693.70 


4,432.00 




7,941.50 






5,291.05 




2,000.00 


60,660.00 


84.685.00 


55,509.08 


55,644.79 


15,000.00 


23,900.00 




5,071.50 


7,041,679.07- 


5,360,757.11 


14,400.17 


.00 


14,400.17 


534.53 


313.76 


4,962.00 


11,672.45 


576.10 


628.70 


136.00 


108.50 


7,845.85 


9,357.08 


104,199.92 


90.835.91 


2,544.50 


2,586.01 


9,025.09 


6,480.37 


360.00 




1,715.00 




6,318.83 


4,383.66 


319.63 


94,183.97 


1,341.55 


660.00 


1,161.77 


756.15 


141,040.77 


221,966.56 


411,761.32 


424,410.76 


22,926.43 


26,797.65 


18,533.83 


11,768.04 


19.000.00 


6,803.00 


913,357.56 


314,523.17 


1,385,579.14 


784,302.62 



Library: 
Fines 

Cemetery: 

Sale of Lots & Graves 
Internments, Labor, Material 
P/C Bequests 

Total Departmental Receipts 

Municipal Indebtedness: 
Anticipation of Revenue 
Anticipation of Bond Issue 
Bond Issue — Crystal Lake 

Interest: 
Taxes 
Deposits 

Federal Revenue Sharing 

Antirecession Fiscal Assis. 

Total From Loans & Interest 

Refunds 

Agency, Trust & Investment: 

Payroll- Withholdings 

Cemetery — P/C Interest 

Dog Licenses Due County 

Due State 

Barris Cemetery Fund 

Conservation Fund 

Douglas Cemetery Fund 

Library Trust Funds 

Barris Varney Playground Fund 

Cash In Lieu of Bonds 

Water District Liens 

Veterans Emergency Fund 

Sinking Fund 

Stabilization Fund 

Fish & Game License Due State 
Total Agency, Trust & Investment 

Total Receipts 

Cash Balance on Hand July 1 

Total 



5,150.00 
13,424.00 
8,674.00 



6,390.00 
16,773.50 
13,035.00 



1,559,151.44 1,047,940.87 



2,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 
545,000.00 134,214.00 
545,000.00 100,000.00 



31,052.69 


31,292.90 


61,322.53 


65,715.67 


18,761.99 


26,121.07 


1,816.12 


3,760.84 


3,202,953.33 


5,361,104.48 


90,571.54 


17,178.20 


4,305,630.03 


4,225,280.54 


17,395.00 


13,613.08 


9,184.30 


6,972.10 


400.00 


950.00 


1,000.00 




435.00 


5,440.00 


3,316.79 


3,604.23 


3,587.44 


1,160.53 


250.00 




6,655.00 


1,500.00 


10,433.56 


8,013.87 




250.00 


2,712.21 


60,000.00 


53,263.00 


35,020.06 




11,660.25 


4,415,202.33 


4,374,527.66 


30,657,172.35 


34,183,294.57 


3,402,051.01 


2,350,377.49 



34,059,223.36 36.533,672.06 



105 



TOWN EMPLOYEES' SAL* 


^RIES 


Clerk 
Clerk 


Department: Accounting 




Clerk 


Position Regular Pay 


Gross Pay 


Clerk 
Clerk 


Town Accountant $17,315.52 


$17,315.52 


Clerk 


Senior Clerk 8,789.84 


8,789.84 


Clerk 


Senior Clerk 8,789.84 


8,789.84 


Clerk 


Senior Clerk 8,789.84 


8,789.84 


Clerk 


Department: Assessors 




Clerk 


Assessor (Full Time) 


$16,687.00 


Clerk 


Assessor (Part Time) 


4,246.00 


Clerk 


Assessor (Part Time) 


4,246.00 


Clerk 


Administrative Ass't 


10,752.00 


Clerk 


Senior Clerk 


9,360.00 


Clerk 


Senior Clerk 


9,360.00 


Clerk 


Jr. Clerk 


7,488.00 


Clerk 
Clerk 


Department: Elections 




Clerk 


Clerk 


7.50 


Clerk 


Clerk 


73.13 


Clerk 


Clerk 


31.25 


Clerk 


Clerk 


147.26 


Clerk 


Clerk 


48.75 


Clerk 


Clerk 


38.75 


Clerk 


Clerk 


73.13 


Clerk 


Clerk 


121.13 


Clerk 


Clerk 


27.50 


Clerk 


Clerk 


31.25 


Clerk 


Clerk 


52.98 


Clerk 


Clerk 


27.50 


Clerk 


Clerk 


49.38 


Clerk 


Clerk 


60.63 


Clerk 


Clerk 


60.63 


Clerk 


Clerk 


60.00 


Clerk 


Clerk 


20.00 


Clerk 


Clerk 


60.63 


Clerk 


Clerk 


32.50 


Clerk 


Clerk 


60.63 


Clerk 


Clerk 


18.75 


Clerk 


Clerk 


70.63 


Clerk 


Clerk 


37.50 


Clerk 


Clerk 


100.63 


Clerk 


Clerk 


165.99 


Clerk 


Clerk 


219.15 


Clerk 


Clerk 


66.26 


Clerk 


Clerk 


104.07 


Clerk 


Clerk 


27.50 


Clerk 


Clerk 


66.26 


Clerk 


Clerk 


27.50 


Clerk 


Clerk 


35.63 


Clerk 


Clerk 


16.25 


Clerk 


Clerk 


21.25 


Clerk 


Clerk 


40.00 


Clerk 


Clerk 


12.50 


Clerk 


Clerk 


182.63 


Clerk 


Clerk 


180.13 


Clerk 


Clerk 


242.57 


Clerk 


Clerk 


54.38 


Clerk 


Clerk 


195.07 


Clerk 


Clerk 


43.13 


Clerk 


Clerk 


63.13 


Clerk 


Clerk 


24.38 


Clerk 


Clerk 


53.13 


Clerk 



33.75 
23.75 
7.50 
26.25 
120.41 
83.13 
215.77 
60.63 
58.75 
16.25 
58.75 
117.63 
38.75 
41.88 
21.25 
7.50 
18.75 
40.00 
27.50 
26.25 
45.00 
35.00 
15.00 
88.13 
15.00 
80.63 
74.38 
71.88 
48.76 
15.63 
32.50 
66.26 
49.38 
219.15 
40.00 
172.74 
7.50 
7.50 
17.50 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
8.13 
8.13 
23.75 
23.75 
18.75 
17.50 
10.00 
17.50 
40.63 
55.01 
11.25 
11.25 
10.00 
40.00 
10.00 
45.00 
12.50 
200.24 
12.50 
12.50 
41.88 



106 



Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 



13.75 


Clerk 


35.00 


Clerk 


12.50 


Clerk 


12.50 


Clerk 


12.50 


Clerk 


12.50 


Clerk 


12.50 


Clerk 


11.25 


Clerk 


11.25 


Clerk 


11.25 


Clerk 


11.25 


Clerk 


11.25 


Clerk 


13.75 


Clerk 


13.75 


Clerk 


20.00 


Clerk 


13.75 


Clerk 


13.75 


Clerk 


13.75 


Clerk 


13.75 


Clerk 


13.75 


Clerk 


70.48 


Clerk 


41.25 


Clerk 


10.00 


Clerk 


27.50 


Clerk 


16.25 


Clerk 


32.50 


Clerk 


221.21 


Clerk 


213.71 


Clerk 


21.25 


Clerk 


21.25 


Clerk 


185.45 


Clerk 


8.13 


Clerk 


32.50 


Clerk 


8.75 


Clerk 


8.75 


Clerk 


318.52 


Clerk 


186.07 


Clerk 


16.25 


Clerk 


16.25 


Clerk 


11.25 


Clerk 


16.25 


Clerk 


28.13 


Clerk 


10.00 


Clerk 


10.00 


Clerk 


10.00 


Clerk 


10.00 


Clerk 


42.51 


Clerk 


16.25 


Clerk 


16.25 


Clerk 


16.25 


Clerk 


16.25 


Clerk 


16.25 


Clerk 


16.25 


Clerk 


16.25 


Clerk 


11.25 


Clerk 


11.25 


Clerk 


11.25 


Clerk 


11.25 


Clerk 


13.75 


Clerk 


11.25 


Clerk 


86.88 


Clerk 


11.25 


Clerk 


28.75 


Clerk 


38.75 


Clerk 



20.00 
17.50 
17.50 
17.50 
17.50 
37.50 
17.50 
21.88 
11.25 
11.25 
11.25 
11.25 
11.25 
11.25 
27.50 
11.25 
11.25 
16.25 
11.25 
11.25 
17.50 
15.63 
45.63 
21.25 
56.26 
26.25 
52.50 
26.25 
41.25 
50.63 
21.25 

7.50 
21.25 
33.75 
11.25 
41.25 

8.13 
55.01 
42.51 
20.63 
37.50 
21.25 
65.63 
52.50 
10.00 
17.50 
17.50 
17.50 
17.50 
17.50 
75.63 
17.50 
17.50 
21.88 
12.50 
12.50 
28.75 
12.50 
16.25 
18.75 
16.25 
16.25 
23.75 
85.63 



107 



Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 

Department: Dog Officer 

Position 

Dog Officer 
Asst. Dog Officer 

Department: Cemetery 

Position 

Superintendent 
Foreman 

Backhoe Operator 
Landscape Gardner 
Laborer 
Laborer P.T. 
Laborer P.T. 
Laborer P.T. 
Commissioner 
Commissioner 
Commissioner 

Department: Library 

Position 

Assistant Director 

Specialist 

Clerk 

Assistant Librarian 

Assistant Librarian 

Aide 

Clerk 

Director 

Assistnt Librarian 

Aide 

Assistant Librarian 

Assistant Janitor 

Assistant Librarian 

Assistant Librarian 

Assistant Librarian 

Department Head 

Maintenance Supervisor 

Specialist 

Department Head 

Aide 

Assistant Librarian 

Department Head 

Department Head 

Aide 

Clerk 

Assistant Librarian 

Branch Librarian 



135.95 


Clerk 


23.75 


Clerk 


30.00 


Clerk 


18.75 


Clerk 


71.13 


Clerk 


83.12 


Clerk 


146.28 


Clerk 


60.63 


Clerk 


37.50 


Clerk 


67.50 


Clerk 


66.88 


Clerk 


31.25 


Clerk 


52.50 





199.20 
110.83 
36.25 
67.50 
86.38 
17.50 
61.88 
96.25 
52.50 
68.75 
23.75 
82.33 



Gross Pay 



7,910.16 








6,310.72 








Regular Pay 


Overtime Pay 


Other 


Gross Pay 


15,525,84 






15,525.84 


12,925.85 


1,924.79 


-1,206.24 


13,644.40 


11,076.46 


1,401.65 


752.72 


13,860.83 


9,951.02 


1,247.64 


- 679.04 


10,519.52 


8,950.83 


1,818.70 


207.28 


10,976.81 


1,968.00 






1,968.00 


1,032.00 






1,032.00 


3,312.00 






3,312.00 


100.00 






100.00 


100.00 






100.00 


100.00 






100.00 


Regular Pay 


Overtime 


Other 


Gross Pay 


131.22 






131.22 


4,947.28 






4,947.28 


2,002.50 






2,002.50 


4,647.50 






4,647.50 


6,757.44 






6,757.44 


357.36 






357.36 


403.92 






403.92 


12,867.45 






12,867.45 


2,814.74 






2,814.74 


1,513.19 






1,513.19 


3,741.08 






3,741.08 


3,337.37 






3,337.37 


1,504.80 






1,504.80 


2,477.92 






2,477.92 


90.72 






90.72 


7,881.21 






7,881.21 


3.877.90 


502.68 


6,332.18 


10,712.76 


574.27 






574.27 


8,101.85 






8,101.85 


292.85 






292.85 


407.12 






407.12 


7,788.66 






7,688.66 


7,934.20 






7,934.20 


418.74 






418.74 


3,766.97 






3,766.97 


3,407.00 






3,407.00 


10,193.00 






10,193.00 



108 



Assistant Director 






Specialist 






Assistant Librarian 






Assistant Janitor 






Assistant Librarian 






Aide 






Assistant Director 






Specialist 






Assistant Librarian 






Director 






Aide 






Aide 






Specialist 






Department: Health 






Position 


Regular Pay 


Gross Pay 


Chairman 




266.00 


Member 




251.00 


Member 




242.00 


Director 


20,554.20 


20,544.20 


Inspector 


5,076.50 


5,076.50 


Physician 




1,000.00 


Senior Clerk 


8,983.30 


8,983.30 



662.72 
3,691.22 

940.08 

265.40 
3,432.68 
1,340.43 
1,504.80 
7,460.76 
4,038.70 
5,667.75 

262.35 
1,269.98 
4,226.19 



Department: Highway 

Includes full time, seasonal help, employees not 
employed for a full year and employees no longer 
employed by this department. 

Position 

Superintendent of Streets 

Administrative Assistant 

Clerk (Part Time) 

Foreman 

Assistant Foreman 

Grader Operator 

Mechanic, Heavy Equipment 

Mechanic, Heavy Equipment 

Class I - Engineering Equipment Op 

Engineering Equipment Op 

Engineering Equipment Op 

Engineering Equipment Op 

Engineering Equipment Op 

Engineering Equipment Op 



Class I - 

Class I - 

Class I - 

Class I - 

Class I - 

Class III 

Class III 

Class III 

Class III 

Class III 

Class III 

Class III 

Class III 

Class III 

Class III 

Class III 

Class III 

Class III 

Class III 

Class III 

Class III 

Laborer (Skilled) 

Laborer (Skilled) 

Laborer (Skilled) 



• Spec 


al Eq. 


- Spec 


al Eq. 


- Spec 


al Eq. 


• Spec 


al Eq. 


- Spec 


al Eq. 


- Spec 


al Eq. 


- Spec 


al Eq. 


- Spec 


al Eq. 


• Spec 


al Eq. 


- Spec 


al Eq. 


- Spec 


al Eq. 


- Spec 


al Eq 


- Spec 


al Eq 


- Spec 


al Eq 


- Spec 


lal Eq 


- Spec 


lal Eq 



Op. 
Op. 
Op. 
Op. 
Op. 
Op. 
Op. 
Op. 
Op. 
Op. 
Op. 
Op. 
Op. 
Op. 
Op. 
Op. 



Tr. Dr. 
Tr. Dr. 
Tr. Dr. 
Tr. Dr. 
Tr. Dr. 



Tr. 
Tr. 
Tr. 
Tr. 
Tr. 
Tr. 
Tr. 
Tr. 
Tr. 
Tr. 
Tr. 



H'way) 
H'way) 
H'way) 
H'way) 
H'way) 
H'way) 
Waste) 
Waste) 
Waste) 
H'way) 
H'way) 
Dr (Waste) 
H'way) 
H'way) 
Waste) 
Waste) 



6,880.29 



662.72 
3,691.22 

940.08 

265.40 
3,432.68 
1,340.43 
1,504.80 
7,460.76 
4,038.70 
12,548.04 

262.35 
1,269.98 
4,226.19 



Regular Pay 


Overtime 


Dther Gross Pay 


$ 21,692.55 


$ 499.11 $ 22,191.66 


10.054.20 




10,054.20 


1,958.79 




1,958.79 


14,637.76 


4,710.10 


19,347.86 


15,546.42 


3,044.66 


18,591.08 


12,983.92 


4,135.78 


17,119.70 


11,572.84 


3,035.44 


14,608.28 


11,020.54 


3,583.51 


14,604.05 


12,374.40 


1,290.81 


13,765.21 


12,279.57 


1,913.63 


14,193.20 


12,573.44 


3,066.21 


15,639.65 


12,411.54 


2,671.60 


15,083.14 


11,083.52 


417.51 


11,501.03 


1,538.25 


7.92 


1,546.17 


11,925.20 


3,415.30 


15,340.50 


11,466.88 


3,489.23 


14,956.11 


11,530.00 


3,560.21 


15,090.21 


11,796.18 


1.762.07 


13,558.25 


1,368.56 




1,368.56 


9,992.12 


2,135.31 


12,127.43 


11,501.12 


1,743.82 


13,244.94 


11,466.24 


1,138.24 


12,604.48 


11,191.57 


1,484.15 


12,675.72 


11,466.24 


1,648.48 


13,114.72 


11,465.20 


2,135.93 


13,601.13 


11,466.24 


1,228.57 


12,694.81 


33.60 




33.60 


11,083.88 


1,182.69 


12,266.57 


32.00 




32.00 


11,466.24 


1,415.42 


12,881.66 


11,108.32 


1,688.40 


12,796.72 


9,573.69 


1,207.14 


10,780.83 


9,970.81 


1,642.23 


11,613.04 



109 



Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 



(Was 
(Was 
(Was 
(Was 
(Was 
(Was 
(Was 
(Was 
(Was 
(Was 
(Was 
(Was 
(Was 
(Was 
(Was 
(Was 
(Was 
(Was 
(Was 



(General) 
(General) 
(General) 
(General) 
(General) 
(General) 
(General) 
(General) 
(General) 
(General) 
(General) 
(General) 




9,231.62 


15,41.39 


9,726.46 


1,008.95 


11,685.55 


3,428.38 


9,925.24 


777.39 


9,742.14 


1,690.25 


9,783.19 


1,265.89 


2,930.14 


229.44 


2,975.55 


152.96 


2.982.72 


229.44 


2,724.60 


218.69 


3,474.57 


163.85 


1,883.12 


566.86 


1,911.70 


394.19 


8,895.52 


1,004.12 


5,136.92 


609.25 


2,103.60 




1,682.96 




2,122.72 




18.56 




10,252.44 


1,788.67 


9,200.00 


35.44 


9,415.20 


1.756.10 


5,242.36 


1,011.43 


9,585.48 


1,749.57 


9,482.14 


1,688.93 


9,334.16 


1,827.78 


2,338.32 




9,051.32 


1,338.52 


9,972.08 


1,622.75 


8,847.48 


1,161.91 


9,449.63 


1,135.07 



10,772.91 

10,735.41 

15,113.93 

10,702.63 

11,432.39 

11,049.08 

3,159.58 

3,128.51 

3,212.16 

2,943.29 

3,638.42 

2,449.98 

2,305.89 

10,899.64 

5,746.17 

2,103.60 

1,682.96 

2,122.72 

18.56 

12,041.11 

9,235.44 

11,171.30 

6,253.79 

11,335.05 

11,171.07 

11,161.94 

2,388.32 

10,389.84 

11,594.83 

10,009.39 

10,584.70 



Department: Fire 
Position 

Chief 

Deputy Chief 
Officer 
Officer 
Officer 
Officer 
Officer 
Senior Clerk 
Fire Fighter 
Fire Fighter 
Fire Fighter 
Fire Fighter 
Fire Fighter 
Fire Fighter 
Fire Fighter 
Fire Fighter 
Fire Fighter 
Fire Fighter 
Fire Fighter 
Fire Fighter 
Fire Fighter 
Fire Fighter 
Fire Fighter 
Fire Fighter 
Fire Fighter 
Fire Fighter 
Fire Fighter 
Fire Fighter 



Regular 


Overtime 
& Retro 


Longevity 


Other 


Gross 


27,449.84 


f 


$3,293.98 


$2,173.58 


$32,917.40 


23,943.00 




2,760.80 


970.58 


26,743.78 


16,082.37 


3,335.89 


1,940.98 


784.92 


22,114.16 


16,082.37 


4,465.83 


978.12 


784.92 


22,311.24 


16,082.37 




978.12 


784.92 


23,849.05 


16,082.37 




489.79 


784.92 


23,848.62 


16,082.37 




489.79 


784.92 


22,370.00 


8,789.45 




262.60 




9,052.05 


13,978.53 


3,349.89 


1,278.00 


682.22 


19,288.64 


13,978.53 


3,843.85 


425.55 


682.22 


18,930.15 


13,978.53 


3,804.37 


1,488.42 


682.22 


19,962.54 


13,798.53 


3,904.16 


1,278.00 


682.22 


19,842.91 


12,807.04 


3,046.04 




615.08 


16,468.16 


13,030.66 


2.573.92 




627.23 


16,231.81 


13,978.53 


3,905.47 


425.55 


682.22 


18,991.77 


13,978.53 


4,149.62 


852.42 


682.22 


19,662.79 


13,978.53 


4,433.38 




682.22 


19,094.13 


13,030.66 


3,366.48 




627.23 


17,024.37 


13,978.53 


3,133.45 


1,278.00 


682.22 


19,072.20 


13,978.53 


4,011.14 


210.42 


182.22 


18,882.31 


13,978.53 


2,629.53 


1,278.00 


682.22 


18,568.28 


12,807.04 


3,469.96 




615.08 


16,892.08 


13,978.53 


3,815.35 


425.55 


682.22 


18,834.51 


13,978.53 


3,776.28 


1,488.42 


682.22 


19,925.45 


13,978.53 


3,092.95 


1,278.00 


682.22 


19,031.70 


13,978.53 


3,881.61 


425.55 


682.22 


18,967.91 


13,978.53 


2,688.24 


1,488.42 


682.22 


18,827.41 


13,978.53 


3,414.97 


852.42 


682.22 


18,928.14 



110 



Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Fire Figh 
Mechanic 



13,978.53 
13,978.53 
11,707.81 
13,978.53 
13,978.53 
13,978.53 
13,978.53 
13,978.53 
13,978.53 
13,978.53 
13,030.66 
13,030.66 
13,978.53 
13,030.66 
13,978.53 
13,978.53 
13,978.53 
13,978.53 
13,978.53 
12,807.04 
13,978.53 
13,030.66 
13,978.53 
13,978.53 
13,978.53 
13,030.66 
13,630.00 
13,978.53 
13,978.53 
13,978.53 
13,978.53 
13,978.53 
13,978.53 
13,978.53 
13,978.53 
13,059.18 



3,624.07 
2,722.71 
1,425.57 
3,321.10 
3,279.83 
4,045.07 
4,116.81 
3,046.37 
3,991.48 
3,370.99 
3,237.28 
3,234.15 

283.98 
3,590.11 
2,188.21 
1,311.13 
3,748.37 
3,789.27 
2,770.23 
3,505.47 
3,963.43 
2,831.50 
4,521.01 
4,103.41 
4,342.86 
2,969.60 
2,860.06 
4,036.43 
4,146.44 
3,678.03 
2,602.70 
3,607.32 
2,869.90 
3,574.02 
4,483.16 

457.53 



1,278.00 

425.55 
425.55 

1,278.00 
425.55 
852.42 

1,278.00 
852.42 



425.55 

852.42 
425.55 
425.55 
425.55 
1,278.00 

1,488.42 

852.42 

1,278.00 

210.42 



425.55 

425.55 

852.42 

425.55 

1,278.00 

1,278.00 

1,278.00 



682.22 


19,137.24 


682.22 


18,661.46 


605.84 


13,739.22 


682.22 


18,407.40 


682.22 


18,366.13 


682.22 


19,983.82 


682.22 


19,203.11 


682.22 


18,559.54 


682.22 


19,930.23 


682.22 


18,884.16 


627.23 


16,895.17 


627.12 


16,872.07 


627.23 


15,315.29 


627.23 


17,248.00 


682.22 


17,701.38 


682.22 


16,397.43 


682.22 


18,834.67 


682.22 


18,875.57 


682.22 


18,708.98 


615.08 


16,927.59 


682.22 


20,112.60 


627.23 


16,489.39 


682.22 


20,034.18 


682.22 


20,042.16 


682.22 


19,214.03 


627.23 


16,627.49 


627.23 


17,117.29 


682.22 


19,122.73 


682.22 


18,807.19 


682.22 


18,764.33 


682.22 


18,115.87 


682.22 


18,693.62 


682.22 


18,808.65 


682.22 


19,512.77 


682.22 


20,421.91 




13,516.71 



Department: Miscellaneous 

Position 

Recreation Director 

Town Moderator 

Clerk-Bldg. Insp. Dept. 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Sewer Comm. Clerk 

Town Counsel 

Home Rule Advisory Comm. Clerk 

Tree Warden 

Building Inspector 

Appeals Board Clerk 

Recreation Comm. Clerk 

Finance Committee Clerk 

Personnel Board Clerk 

Sewer Comm. Clerk 

Recreation Director 

Historic District Comm. Clerk 

Plumbing Inspector 

Home Rule Advisory Comm. Clerk 

Finance Committee Clerk 

Constable 

Gas Inspector 

Wiring Inspector 

Conservation Comm. Clerk 



Gross Pay 

1,480.00 

300.00 

4,336.16 

2,000.00 

121.73 

500.00 

250.44 

1,600.00 

15,767.49 

2,644.45 

4,719.18 

85.72 

572.23 

60.96 

880.35 

595.50 

983.00 

29.37 

655.04 

3,750.00 

2.700.33 

14,901.48 

384.81 



Department: Park 

Position 

Superintendent 
Part-time help 
Part-time help 
Part-time help 
Part-time help 
Part-time help 
Part-time help 
Part-time help 
Part-time help 



Gross Pay 

16,773.80 

2,085.52 

266.66 

1,252.16 

211.44 

3,996.82 

206.96 

70.23 

31.84 



Ill 



z-1- 3 



Department: Police 














Position 


Regular Pay 


Overtime 


Longevity 


(Not Pd by Tn) 
Outside Details 


*Other 


Gross Pay 


Chief 


$27,354.67 


1 


$2,460.66 


$ 


$1,052.10 


$30,867.43 


Sgt. & Act. Cpt. 


22,155.27 




1,328.26 




2,337.08 


25,020.61 


Sergeant 


15,737.57 


3,145.77 


1,887.05 


2,425.77 


726.00 


23,922.16 


Sergeant 


15,737.57 


4,783.96 


943.53 


108.02 


695.92 


22,269.00 


Sergeant 


15,737.57 


3,689.36 


1,887.26 


1,665.42 


665.60 


23,645.21 


Sergeant 


15,737.57 


4,283.58 


1,414.72 


1,928.64 


2,126.00 


25,490.51 


Sergeant 


15,737.57 


4,514.26 


1,414.72 




695.92 


22,362.47 


Sergeant 


15,737.57 


6,408.45 


943.53 


2,105.76 


2,156.32 


27,351.63 


Sergeant 


14,737.57 


4,257.55 


470.60 


1,362.72 


1,451.01 


23,279.45 


Sergeant 


13,860.36 


4,876.18 


823.98 


1,894.20 


657.32 


22,112.04 


Patlm. & Act. Sgt 


13,876.25 


5,193.01 




915.12 


630.98 


20,615.36 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


4,434.42 




1,343.16 


1,355.98 


20,811.41 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


5,963.24 


409.54 


1,062.72 


578.50 


21,691.85 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


2,253.30 


1,229.76 


1,791.18 


604.84 


19,556.93 


Patrolman 


13,667.85 


3,984.66 


820.13 


757.68 


630.08 


19,871.30 


Patrolman 


13,667.85 


5,865.59 




1,018.44 


1,355.98 


21,917.86 


Patrolman 


3,045.00 




208.12 




209.98 


3,463.10 


Patrolman 


13,306.23 


1,167.18 




280.44 


1,337.66 


16,091.51 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


5,673.96 


410.80 


1,485.84 


1,382.32 


22,630.77 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


1,145.05 


820.22 


2,312.40 


604.84 


18,560.36 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


3,990.91 




1,387.44 


530.98 


19,687.18 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


6,309.09 




1,082.40 


657.32 


21,726.66 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


2,887.46 


409.54 


177.12 


1,382.32 


18,534.29 


Patrolman 


10,841.25 




577.06 


1,081.48 


262.50 


12,762.29 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


522.51 






657.32 


14,857.68 


Patrolman 


12,475.11 


4,825.25 




2,110.68 


1,019.30 


20,43034 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


409.22 


1,229.76 


2,194.62 


604.84 


18,166.29 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


2,584.85 


1,408.30 


1,436.94 


604.84 


19,712.78 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


4,329.63 


1,229.76 


1,938.48 


630.98 


21,806.70 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


6,980.60 




1,672.80 


604.84 


22,936.09 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


8,345.84 


475.90 


1,146.66 


657.32 


24,303.57 


Patrolman 


13,467.85 


2,035.92 


1,229.76 


1,845.00 


604.84 


19,183.37 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


2,041.72 


1,093.47 


98.70 


657.32 


17,569.06 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


6,559.41 


409.54 


2,750.28 


630.98 


24,028.06 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


5,663.21 


475.90 


1,515.66 


631.08 


21,963.70 


Patrolman 


12,063.27 


5,106.89 




1.977.84 


555.56 


19,703.56 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


6,616.72 


584.90 


2,105.91 


631.08 


23,616.46 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


1,567.71 


1,229.76 


649.44 


578.53 


17,703.26 


Patrolman 


13,250.30 


7.313.35 




1,062.72 


618.49 


22,244.86 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


6,190.35 


410.80 


2,686.32 


604.84 


23,570.16 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 




409.54 




578.50 


14,665.89 


Patrolman 


13,667.85 


6,320.39 


409.54 


2,223.84 


844.84 


23,476.46 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


7,960.27 


820.22 


1,259.52 


1,080.98 


24,798.84 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


6,213.20 


409.54 


2,174.64 


784.84 


23,260.07 


Patrolman 


13,677.85 


5,021.45 


820.22 


2,095.92 


810.98 


22,426.42 


Patrolman 


11,893.39 


1,413.97 




196.80 


434.66 


13,938.82 


Patrolman 


8,926.14 


2,518.67 




1,348.08 


320.45 


13,113.34 


Patrolman 


3,888.44 


488.99 




118.08 


91.48 


4,586.99 


Patrolman 


8,013.14 


1,605.06 




1,195.56 


274.80 


11,088.56 


Patrolman 


1,833.20 


584.26 




560.88 


91.66 


3,070.00 


Patrolman 


412.47 


137.48 




39.36 




589.31 


Patrolman 


458.30 










458.30 


Patrolman 


366.64 


12.89 








379.53 


Senior Clerk 


8,790.15 


81.24 








8,871.39 


Senior Clerk 


9,362.65 




87.37 






9,450.02 


Senior Clerk 


3,488.81 










3,488.81 


Custodian 


8,174.40 










8,174.40 


Matron 


395.88 










395.88 


Matron 


142.37 










. 142.37 


Matron 


581.83 










581.83 



112 



School Traffic 


270.51 


School Traffic 


1,581.42 


School Traffic 


1,299.30 


School Traffic 


1,269.48 


School Traffic 


575.10 


School Traffic 


1,184.28 


School Traffic 


1,226.88 


School Traffic 


1,260.96 


School Traffic 


1,303.56 


School Traffic 


1,312.08 


School Traffic 


1,158.72 


School Traffic 


97.98 


School Traffic 


1,239.66 



270.51 
1,581.42 
1,299.30 
1,269.48 

575.10 
1,184.28 
1,226.88 
1,260.96 
1,303.56 
1,312.08 
1,158.72 
97.98 
1,239.66 



*Holidays and Education Incentive 

Department: Recreation Commission 
Position 



Summer Director 
Playground Director 
Playground Director 
Playground Director 
Playground Director 
Playground Director 
Playground Supervisor 
Playground Supervisor 
Playground Supervisor 
Playground Supervisor 
Playground Supervisor 
Playground Supervisor 
Playground Supervisor 
Playground Supervisor 
Playground Supervisor 
Playground Supervisor 
Playground Supervisor 
Sports Instructor 
Sports Instructor 
Sports Instructor 
Sports Instructor 
Sports Instructor 
Sports Instructor 
Sports Instructor 
Sports Instructor 
Sports Instructor 
Sports Instructor 
Sports Instructor 
Swim Director 
Swim Instructor 
Swim Instructor 
Swim Instructor 
Swim Instructor 
Adm. Assistant/Clerk 



Department: Treasurer's 1978 



Regular Pay 


Gross Pay 


Position 


Regular Pay 


Gross Pay 


$ 1,400.00 


$ 1,400.00 


Treasurer 


$19,291.00 


$19,291.00 


540.00 


540.00 


Assistant Treasurer 


10,388.00 


10,388.00 


540.00 


540.00 


Senior Clerk 


8,801.00 


8,801.00 


540.00 


540.00 


Senior Clerk 


8,790.00 


8,790.00 


540.00 


540.00 


Senior Clerk 


8,840.00 


8,840.00 


960.00 


960.00 


Senior Clerk 


8,644.00 


8,644.00 


480.00 


480.00 


Clerk Part Time 


1,789.00 


1,789.00 


480.00 


480.00 


Clerk Part Time 


3,789.00 


3,789.00 


558.00 


558.00 


Clerk Part Time 


872.00 


872.00 


420.00 


420.00 


Clerk Part Time 


680.00 


680.00 


420.00 


420.00 








420.00 


420.00 


Department: Veterans' 


Benefits 




420.00 
589.50 


420.00 
589.50 


Position 


Regular Pay 


Gross Pay 


342.00 


342.00 


Veterans' Agent 


$11,871.96 


$11,871.96 


342.00 


342.00 


Clerical 


4,336.16 


4,336.16 


312.00 


312.00 








675.00 


675.00 


Department: Youth Center 




675.00 
700.00 


675.00 
700.00 


Position 


Regular Pay 


Gross Pay 


560.00 


560.00 


Coordinator 


$ 3,159.96 


$ 3,159.96 


490.00 


490.00 


Coordinator 


7,907.55 


7,907.55 


560.00 


560.00 


Part Time Chf. Sup. 


3,197.58 


3,197.58 


100.00 


100.00 


Clerk Typist 


321.95 


321.95 


100.00 


100.00 


Clerk Typist 


1,368.87 


1,368.87 


350.00 


35.00 


Part Time Supervisor 


126.40 


126.40 


450.00 


450.00 


Part Time Supervisor 


1,461.04 


1,461.04 


400.00 


400.00 


Part Time Supervisor 


2,553.84 


2,553.84 


1,174.38 


1,174.38 


Part Time Supervisor 


2,253.60 


2,253.60 


1,004.88 


1,004.88 








1,004.75 


1,004.75 








1,030.88 


1,030.88 








526.50 


526.50 








5,167.00 


5,167.00 









Department: Selectmen 

Position 

Selectman — Chairman 

Selectman 

Selectman 

Selectman 

Selectman 

Selectman 

Administrative Assistant 



Regular Pay 



Overtime 



Longevity 



Other 



13,209.24 



Gross Pay 

1,374.99 
375.00 
999.96 
749.97 
999.96 
999.96 
13,209.24 



113 



Senior Clerk 


8,674.00 


1,458.03 


Part Time Clerk 


6,398.01 




Department: Town Cle 


rk/Registrars 




Position 


Regular Pay 


Overtime 


Town Clerk 


$16,692.16 




Assistant Town Clerk 


9,747.48 


554.79 


Senior Clerk 


8,789.84 




Senior Clerk 


8,789.84 


522.26 


Part Time Clerk 


4,385.25 




Registrar 


360.00 




Registrar 


360.00 




Registrar 


75.00 




Registrar (T) 


270.00 





10,538.55 
6,398.01 



Longevity Other Gross Pay 

$16,692.16 

10,302.27 

8,789.84 

9,312.10 

4,385.25 

360.00 

260.00 

75.00 

270.00 



114 



Department: School 

Position Regular Pay 

Administration 

Superintendent $40 , 1 99 . 90 

Asst. Superintendent 32,099.86 

Personnel Director 22,092.20 

Fed. Projects Director 28,574.91 

Supervision 

Foreign Language 21,898.89 

Art 24,965.07 

Science & Health Ed 24,966.47 

Career Education 21,788.39 

Social Studies 6,198.06 

Mathematics 19,362.20 

Social Studies 7,259.40 

Music 23,552.88 

Reading 9,996.02 

Language Arts 23,357.32 

Phys. Ed. & Athletics 27,618.33 

High School Administration 

Principal 28,939.82 

Assistant Principal 26,426.40 

Dean 22,215.05 

Dean 22,215.05 

Dean 25,263.69 

Teachers — High School 

Reading 18,325.24 

Reading 15,636.26 

English 15,531.06 

English 15,452.04 

English 15,235.44 

English 18,915.55 

English 16,849.70 

English 17,203.16 

English 13,118,25 

English 13,425.89 

English 14,339.03 

English 14,666.36 

English 14,008.92 

English 10,911.05 

English 12,343.41 

English 16,104.92 

English 1,027.00 

English 12,395.48 

English 15,636.25 

English 10,732.47 

English 6,658.97 

English 14,431.57 

English 10,493.57 

English 4,193.20 

English 4,385.80 

English 7,210.50 

English 3,711.14 

Bus. Ed. 15,545.48 

Bus. Ed. 14,497.74 

Bus. Ed. 17,060.76 

Bus. Ed. 11,651.05 

Bus. Ed. 13,029.30 

Bus. Ed. 3,306.64 

Bus. Ed. 14,225.50 

Bus. Ed. 18,325.24 

Bus. Ed. 8,346.66 



Overtime 



Longevity 



Other 



Gross Pay 





$40,199.90 




32,099.86 


161.52 


22,253.72 




28,574.91 


3,165.68 


25,064.57 


3,165.68 


28,119.75 


3,577.04 


28,543.51 


3,165.68 


24,954.07 


516.50 


6,714.56 


3,215.36 


22,577.56 


753.18 


8,012.58 




23,552.88 


3,045.84 


13,041.86 




23,357.32 




27,618.33 




28,939.82 




26,426.40 


3,048.64 


25,263.69 


3,048.64 


25,263.69 




25,263.69 


-192.36 


18,132.88 


2,413.77 


18,050.03 


2,557.04 


18,088.10 


2,907.44 


18,359.48 


2,800.51 


18,035.95 


-192.36 


18,723.19 


-173.54 


16,676.16 


-173.54 


17,029.62 


-455.01 


12,663.24 


2,576.45 


16,002.34 


2,788.59 


17,127.62 


-159.68 


14,506.68 


2,522.22 


16,531.14 


2,016.54 


12,927.50 


2,352.69 


14,696.00 


3,106.64 


19,211.56 




1,027.00 


1,851.52 


14,247.00 


3,160.60 


18,796.85 


2,111.57 


12,844.04 


2,148.45 


8,807.42 


2,688.56 


17,120.13 




10,493.57 


-148.12 


4,045.08 


1,966.79 


6,352.59 


2,267.50 


9,478.00 


-69.14 


3,642.00 


3,106.64 


18,652.12 


2,688.56 


17,186.30 


-180.44 


16,880.32 


2,016.45 


13,667.50 


2,464.36 


15,493.66 


1,453.70 


4,760.34 


2,450.66 


16,676.16 


-192.36 


18,132.88 


2,384.76 


10,731.42 



115 



Bus. Ed. 

Bus. Ed. 

Foreign Lang 

Foreign Lang 

Foreign Lang. 

Foreign Lang 

Foreign Lang 

Foreign Lang 

Foreign Lang 

Foreign Lang 

Foreign Lang 

Foreign Lang 

Foreign Lang 

Foreign Lang 

Foreign Lang 

Foreign Lang 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Music 

Music 

Music 

Art 

Art 

Art 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 



[J 



\s 



775.00 
260.86 
423.32 
141.64 
651.32 
505.94 
050.29 
209.26 
439.52 
169.81 
932.45 
647.78 
225.60 
760.87 
194.44 
434.50 
271.30 
007.24 
269.66 
526.88 
788.28 
576.20 
153.00 
051.51 
451.44 
841.92 
968.86 
594.30 
948.76 
196.93 
507.64 
658.20 
980.66 



14,368.378 



308.82 
763.91 
876.48 
959.30 
849.70 
572.55 
320.95 
943.53 
518.29 
128.30 
659.11 
455.19 
983.14 
702.08 
403.94 
168.68 
699.89 
141.64 
003.20 
267.09 
551.34 
603.13 
324.09 
325.24 
879.14 
068.91 
229.96 
083.94 
229.46 
442.46 





775.00 


1,680.48 


11,941.34 


-166.60 


17,256.72 


3,155.34 


6,309.98 


1,904.54 


12,555.86 


2,149.30 


12,655.24 


1,829.39 


10,879.68 


1,680.48 


10,899.74 


2,029.60 


12,511.37 


2,746.26 


16,916.07 


2,800.51 


17,732.96 


2,831.84 


18,479.62 


2,226.62 


14,452.22 


2,338.75 


15,099.62 


1,246.88 


3,441.32 


-145.84 


8,288.66 


2,128.58 


13,399.88 


-173.54 


18,833.70 


2,464.52 


15,734.18 




1,526.88 




13,788.28 


2,929.72 


11,505.92 




9,153.00 


3,081.37 


18,132.88 


3,048.94 


18,500.38 




3,841.92 


-125.06 


3,843.80 


-145.84 


4,448.46 


-152.76 


14,796.00 


2,743.05 


10,939.98 


2,464.52 


15,972.16 


2,522.22 


16,180.42 


2,464.52 


15,445.18 


2,634.10 


17,002.48 


1,904.54 


12,213.36 


2,352.59 


15,116.50 


-145.84 


14,730.64 


2,048.94 


19,008.24 


-173.54 


16,676.16 


2,353.59 


14,925.15 




17,320.95 


-173.54 


20,770.00 


2,992.81 


19,511.10 


2,128.58 


16,268.13 


2,794.51 


18,453.62 


3,048.94 


18,549.13 


2,464.52 


16,447.66 


933.60 


7,635.68 


3,048.94 


22,452.88 


2,323.98 


16,492.66 


1,131.32 


8,831.21 


-104.30 


3,037.34 


1,910.75 


7,925.20 


1,792.61 


12,059.70 


-111.22 


3,440.12 


-79.84 


5.523.29 


1,792.61 


12,116.70 


-175.61 


18,149.63 


2,464.52 


15,343.66 


2,505.39 


10,574.26 


714.15 


5,472.48 


3,048.94 


18,132.88 


2,688.56 


16,918.02 


3,048.94 


18,491.40 



116 



Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Social Studies 
Social Studies 
Social Studies 
Social Studies 
Social Studies 
Social Studies 
Social Studies 
Social Studies 
Social Studies 
Social Stuudies 
Social Studies 
Social Studies 
Social Studies 
Social Studies 
Social Studies 
Home Ec 
Home Ec 
IA 
IA 
IA 
IA 

V ,A 

v Work Study 

Work Study 
Librarian 
Librarian 

Supervisor — Guidance 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Dist. Ed. 

Health Ed. 
Health Ed. 
Health Ed. 

Parker Junior High 

„ Principal 
v Asst. Principal 

Teacher — Parker 

English 
English 
English 
English 
English 
; \ English 

English 
English 
English 
English 
English 



14,686.75 
14,339.03 
15,601.93 
17,922.52 

3,760.14 
18,634.48 
13,868.75 
17,690.28 
10,878.82 
16,233.96 
15,424.44 

4,558.57 
15,624.65 
15,083.94 
10,136.29 
18,860.90 
16,235.35 
12,060.57 
10,763.05 
16,945.22 
12,880.14 
15,267.44 
13,868.75 
16,849.50 
14,590.26 
15,786.26 
15,083.94 
13,868.75 
15,335.35 

8,524.46 
16,910.94 
12,906.14 
13,443.89 
23,965.37 
15,552.04 

6,885.50 
19,096.26 
15,183.94 
15,183.94 
15,396.64 
15,083.94 
15,403.44 
13,829.72 

4,385.80 

20,283.28 

8,263.40 

16,593.84 



27,840.93 
24,710.40 



15,572.04 

9,355.46 

14,177.74 

2,289.68 

16,346.85 

11,128.46 

11,198.05 

12,416.89 

15,825.95 

8,280.96 

12,950.50 



2,858.21 


17,544.96 


2,788.59 


17,127.62 


2,965.09 


18,567.02 


-173.54 


17,748.98 


-118.14 


3,642.00 


-192.36 


18,442.12 


2,0807.41 


16,676.16 


-173.54 


17,516.72 


2,016.45 


12,895.27 


3,106.64 


19,340.60 


3,048.94 


18,473.38 


702.39 


5,260.96 


2,980.95 


18,605.60 


3,241.30 


18,232.24 


1,534.38 


11,670.67 


-192.36 


18,668.54 


3,106.59 


19,341.94 


2,298.11 


14,358.68 


2,016.45 


12,779.50 


2,912.42 


18,857.64 


2,464.52 


15,344.60 


3,048.94 


18,316.38 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


-173.54 


16,676.16 


2,746.26 


17,336.52 


3,160.60 


18,946.86 


3,048.94 


18,132.88 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


3,106.59 


18,441.94 


2,862.10 


11,386.56 


3,048.94 


19,959.88 


2,464.52 


15,370.66 


2,576.45 


16,020.34 




23,965.37 


2,907.44 


18,459.48 


2267.50 


9,153.00 


-199.40 


18,896.86 


3,048.94 


18,232.88 


3,048.94 


18,232.88 


3,152.11 


18,548.75 


3,048.94 


18,132.88 


3,048.94 


18,452.38 


2,384.16 


16,113.88 


-138.92 


4,246.88 


-192.36 


20,090.92 


2,537.34 


10,800.74 


2,907.44 


19,553.42 




27,840.93 




24,710.40 


2,907.44 


18,479.48 


1,877.48 


11,232.92 


2,688.56 


16,892.30 


1,374.11 


3,663.79 


3,395.12 


19,741.97 


-111.22 


11,017.24 


2,016.45 


13,234.00 


2,576.45 


15,993.34 


3,048.94 


18,874.89 


1,687.40 


9,968.36 


-132.00 


12,818.50 



117 



English 

Reading 

Reading 

Reading 

Reading 

Reading 

Foreign Lang. 

Foreign Larig. 

Foreign Lang. 

Foreign Lang. 

Foreign Lang. 

Foreign Lang. 

Foreign Lang. 

Foreign Lang. 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Music 

Music 

Music 

Music 

Art 

Art 

Art 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Social Studies 

Social Studies 

Social Studies 

Social Studies 

Social Studies 

Social Studies 

Social Studies 

Social Studies 

Social Studies 

Social Studies 

Home Ec 

Home Ec 

Home Ec 

Home Ec 

Home Ec 

IA 

IA 



15,083.94 
15,083.94 
243.46 
13,884.51 
12,879.14 
2,092.48 
533.27 
148.56 
587.50 
265.38 
416.89 
984.92 
004.28 
009.25 
566.32 
853.54 
995.92 
083.94 
808.68 
343.41 
880.14 
952.94 
177.74 
481.38 
224.80 
231.06 
511.18 
102.59 
082.50 
080.51 
131.04 
497.42 
347.11 
986.43 
212.25 
737.44 
222.32 
531.06 
456.56 
853.58 
702.24 
454.23 
749.06 
325.24 
299.89 
849.70 
825.87 
526.04 
485.64 
884.51 
653.11 
868.75 
895.79 
416.89 
713.58 
010.24 
449.97 
172.97 
148.56 
140.12 
614.08 
14,692.07 
12,950.50 



15 



180.12 



3,048.94 
3,048.94 
2,464.52 
2,980.95 
2,464.52 

2,576.45 
234.00 
4,800.93 
2,116.54 
2,576.45 
182.90 
1,243.26 
2,807.41 
1,904.54 
3,279.74 
-125.06 
3,048.94 
2,240.46 
2,352.59 
2,375.69 
2,688.56 
2,526.80 
1,904.54 
2,902.40 

3,145.12 
1,910.75 
-132.00 
1,014.00 

3,241.30 
2,659.75 

2,862.10 
3,048.94 

676.00 
-156.06 
-192.36 

572.00 
-173.54 
2,800.51 
1,904.54 
-192.36 
2,576.45 
-173.54 
2,807.41 

730.00 
2,578.45 
2,807.41 
2,800.51 
2,807.41 
53.34 
2,576.45 
3,145.14 

2,343.89 
2,148.45 
1,958.58 
-118.14 

2,343.89 
-132.00 
3,048.94 



18,132.88 
18,132.88 
13,707.96 
16,865.46 
15,343.66 

2,092.48 
16,109.72 

3,382.56 

6,446.93 

9,381.92 
16,012.84 

5,167.82 

3,247.54 
16,948.66 
12,574.86 
19,133.28 
13,870.86 
18,132.88 
14,075.14 
14,696.00 
15,273.70 
16,641.50 
16,704.54 
12,385.92 
12,127.20 

3,231.06 
18,656.30 
11,013.34 
12,950.50 

2,094.51 

131.04 

19,738.72 

19,006.86 

3,986.43 
17,074.35 
18,838.88 

1,924.32 

375.00 

19,264.20 

1,425.58 
17,528.70 
17,254.74 
12,702.35 
18,132.88 
16,876.34 
16,676.16 
16,633.28 

1,256.04 
16,062.09 
16,691.92 
17,453.62 
16,676.16 

5,948.98 
15,993.34 
18,858.72 
19,010.24 
15,793.86 

9,321.42 

5,107.14 
12,021.98 
614.08 
17,035.96 
12,818.50 
18,229.06 



118 



I 



/o 



k 



IA 


12,448.54 


Librarian 


15,452.04 


Guidance Counselor 


6,229.96 


Guidance Counselor 


10,198.82 


Guidance Counselor 


3,550.86 


Guidance Counselor 


12,608.68 


McCarthy Junior High 




Building Master 


26,121.18 


House Master 


25,921.26 


House Master 


23,370.82 


Teachers — McCarthy 




English 


10,198.82 


English 


16,276.32 


English 


8,786.50 


English 


16,003.14 


English 


15,367.63 


English 


3,134.26 


English 


11,271.30 


English 


8,322.21 


English 


13,416.89 


English 


15,452.04 


English 


728.56 


English 


5,339.28 


English 


2,431.10 


English 


13,538.80 


English 


12,880.14 


Reading 


12,173.28 


Reading 


15,564.86 


Reading 


3,760.14 


Reading 


6,885.50 


Reading 


13,833.39 


Foreign Lang. 


11,381.30 


Foreign Lang. 


3,216.76 


Foreign Lang. 


14,848.76 


Foreign Lang. 


12,543.41 


Foreign Lang. 


2,004.28 


Foreign Lang. 


13,278.34 


Foreign Lang. 


14,194.98 


Foreign Lang. 


12,884.50 


Mathematics 


14,912.85 


Mathematics 


15,511.26 


Mathematics 


15,452.04 


Mathematics 


13,580.14 


Mathematics 


11,110.96 


Mathematics 


13,416.89 


Mathematics 


17,885.34 


Mathematics 


15,083.94 


Mathematics 


12,343.41 


Mathematics 


9,854.59 


Mathematics 


10,908.35 


Music 


11,014.98 


Music 


14,433.92 


Music 


3,224.14 


Music 


12,456.76 


Art 


3,578.84 


Art 




Art 


9,867.65 


Art 


9,689.59 


Phys. Ed. 


8,920.70 


Phys. Ed. 


17,205.70 


Phys. Ed. 


15,414.94 


Phys. Ed. 


13,185.68 


Science 


16,468.34 



52.00 



-125.06 


12,323.39 


2,907.44 


18,359.48 


2,029.60 


8,259.56 


1,904.54 


12,103.36 


-66.14 


3,484.72 


2,240.46 


14,749.14 


157.19 


26,278.37 




25,921.26 




23,422.82 


1,904.54 


12,103.36 


-166.60 


16,109.72 


2,903.18 


11,689.68 


3,019.40 


19,022.54 


2,576.45 


17,944.08 


3,357.75 


6,492.01 


2,133.80 


13,405.10 


1,692.62 


10,014.83 


2,581.67 


15,998.56 


2,912.66 


18,364.70 




728.56 


717.60 


6,056.88 


-138.92 


2,292.18 


-138.92 


13,399.88 


2,464.52 


15,344.66 


2,240.46 


14,413.74 


3,054.16 


18,619.00 


-118.14 


3,642.00 


2,272.72 


9,158.22 


2,581.67 


16,415.06 


2,128.58 


13,509.88 


2,776.38 


5,993.14 


-152.76 


14,696.00 


2,352.59 


14,896.00 


1,243.26 


3,247.54 


2,469.74 


15,748.08 


-145.84 


14,049.14 


-132.00 


12,752.50 


2.800.51 


17,713.36 


-159.68 


15,351.58 


2,907.44 


18,359.48 


2,464.52 


16,044.66 


-106.00 


11,004.96 


2,581.67 


15,998.56 


-154.46 


17,730.88 


3,054.16 


18,138.10 


2,357.81 


14,701.22 


1,797.83 


11,652.42 


2,012.21 


12,920.56 


5.22 


11,020.20 


-145.84 


14,288.08 


-104.30 


3,119.84 


-119.84 


12,336.92 


111.20 


3,467.64 


215.20 


215.20 


2,132.26 


11,999.91 


1,797.83 


11,487.42 


136.76 


9,057.46 


-173.54 


17,032.16 


3,054.16 


18,499.10 


2,494.20 


15,709.88 


5.22 


16,473.56 



119 



Science 


19,696.16 


Science 


15,083.94 


Science 


11,092.05 


Science 


15,555.31 


Science 


19,049.24 


Science 


15,555.31 


Science 


15,872.04 


Science 


10,198.82 


Science 


12,319.12 


Science 




Science 


13,192.04 


Social Studies 


13,868.75 


Social Studies 


15,636.26 


Social Studies 


14,603.12 


Social Studies 


5,575.42 


Social Studies 


13,416.89 


Social Studies 


10,461.32 


Social Studies 


12,879.14 


Social Studies 


9,862.76 


Social Studies 


4,593.86 


Social Studies 


15,503.08 


Social Studies 


4,563.38 


Social Studies 


7,229.12 


Social Studies 


12,800.30 


Social Studies 


3,558.26 


Social Studies 


9,153.00 


Home Ec. 


3,224.14 


Home Ec. 


13,638.47 


Home Ec. 


8,123.98 


Home Ec. 


10,222.45 


Home Ec. -> q 

IA 31 

IA \ 


7,921.43 


9,341.95 


14,743.33 


IA 


5,901.95 


IA 


13,100.00 


Librarian 


12,879.14 


Guidance Counselor 


12,343.41 


Guidance Counselor 


15,636.26 


Guidance Counselor 


15,745.16 


Byam School / 
Principal 




26,005.98 


Teacher 


3,357.84 


Teacher 




Teacher 


12,343.41 


Teacher 


11,372.90 


Teacher 


10,198.82 


Teacher 


12,880.14 


Teacher 


14,959.98 


Teacher 


8,674.48 


Teacher 


10,736.05 


Teacher 


11,271.30 


Teacher 


13,625.37 


Teacher "S -w 
Teacher '/ 


18,325.24 


12,486.26 


Teacher 


12,343.41 


Teacher 


3,551.34 


Teacher 


6,522.65 


Teacher 


990.00 


Teacher 


11,979.63 


Teacher 


11,808.68 


Teacher 


14,950.28 


Teacher 


5,018.14 


Teacher 


7,540.91 



-199.40 


19,494.76 


3,054.16 


18,138.10 


2,016.45 


13,108.50 


2,716.27 


18,271.58 


-187.14 


18,862.10 


2,805.73 


18,361.04 


2,912.66 


18,787.70 


1,909.76 


12,108.58 


2,245.68 


14,564.80 


872.28 


872.28 


2,240.46 


15,432.50 


2,812.62 


16,681.38 


3,373.98 


19,010.24 


-115.76 


14,487.36 


1,796.92 


7,372.34 


2,576.45 


15,993.34 


1,909.76 


12,371.08 


2,469.74 


15,348.88 


1,685.70 


11,548.46 


-152.76 


4,441.10 


3,145.14 


18,648.22 


845.46 


5,408.84 


5.22 


7,234.34 


2,212.70 


15,013.00 


-118.14 


3,440.12 




9,153.00 


2,851.70 


6,075.84 


2,743.05 


16,381.52 


5.22 


8,129.20 


1,792.61 


12,015.06 


2,505.35 


10,426.78 


1,681.28 


11,023.23 


2,805.73 


17,549.06 


1,910.75 


7,812.70 


-132.00 


13,237.75 


2,464.52 


15,343.66 


2,352.59 


14,696.00 


3,160.60 


18,796.86 


2,912.42 


18,657.58 




26,005.98 


4,926.99 


8,284.83 


26.90 


26.90 


2,352.59 


14,696.00 


2,128.58 


13,501.48 


1,904.54 


12,103.36 


2,464.52 


15,344.66 


2,746.26 


17,706.24 


2,919.80 


11,594.28 


2,016.45 


12,752.50 


2,128.58 


13,399.88 


2,569.51 


16,194.88 


-375.56 


17,949.68 


-125.06 


12,361.20 


1,998.59 


14,342.00 


-111.22 


3,440.12 


1,814.00 


8,336.65 




990.00 


2,410.24 


14,389.87 


2,240.46 


14,049.14 


-152.76 


14,797.52 


-166.60 


4,851.54 


2,505.35 


10,046.26 



120 



Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
, Teacher 
y Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 



14,177.74 

8,259.56 

10,348.71 

728.76 

17,249.84 

11,808.68 

12,880.14 

11,271.30 

13,131.55 

7,868.92 

13,868.75 

12,133.14 



2,688.56 

1,962.19 
1,313.00 
-173.54 
2,240.46 
2,464.52 
2,128.58 
2,522.17 
2,704.04 
2,807.41 
2,216.71 



16,866.30 
8,259.56 
12,310.90 
2,014.76 
17,076.30 
14,049.14 
15,344.66 
13,399.88 
15,653.72 
10,572.96 
16,676.16 
14,349.85 



Parker-Grade 6 

Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 



10,198.82 
16,159.94 
10,198.82 
11,808.68 



1,904.54 
-166.60 
1,904.54 
2,240.46 



12,103.36 
15,993.34 
12,103.36 
14,049.14 



Center School 

Principal 

Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 

Harrington School 

Principal 

Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 



26,005.98 

17,659.46 
12,343.41 

5,904.34 

552.21 

13,884.51 

15,337.87 

4,176.60 
13,868.75 
18,325.24 
16,849.70 
13,952.94 
16,849.70 
16,849.70 
15,409.88 
15,748.26 
13,118.79 
11,808.68 
15,083.94 
16,849.70 

9,281.57 
15,083.94 

6,229.96 
10,736.05 
13,868.75 
13,868.75 



26,005.98 

11,271.30 
15,337.87 
16,849.70 
15,624.02 

7,214.38 
16,292.62 

3,148.56 
3, 566.08 

7,748.56 
12,343.41 
13,929.69 
13,538.80 
13,416.89 



2,342.59 
1,120.23 
1,786.00 
2,980.95 
3,241.30 
-138.92 
2,807.41 
-192.36 
-173.54 
2,688.56 
-173.54 
-173.54 
2,949.60 
3,160.60 
2,590.29 
1,698.33 
3,241.30 

2,815.83 
3,048.94 
2,029.60 
2,016.45 
2,807.41 
2,807.41 



2,128.58 
3,241.30 
-173.54 
3,106.64 
2,386.30 
-159.68 
1,207.00 
1,384.18 
325.00 
2,353.59 
2,807.41 
-267.08 
2,305.13 



26,005.98 

17,659.46 
14,696.00 

7,024.57 

2,338.21 
16,865.46 
18,579.17 

4,037.68 
16,676.16 
18,132.88 
16,676.18 
16,641.50 
16,676.16 
16,676.16 
18,359.48 
18,908.88 
15,709.08 
13,507.01 
18,325.24 
16,849.70 
12,097.40 
18,132.88 

8,259.56 
12,752.50 
16,676.16 
16,676.16 



26,005.98 

12,399.88 

18,579.17 

16,676.16 

18,730.66 

9,600.68 

16,132.94 

4,355.56 

4,950.26 

8,073.56 

14,696.00 

16,737.10 

13,271.72 

15,722:02 



121 



Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 



9,368.33 
12,419.79 
10,868.05 
13,130.68 

6,885.50 
18,634.48 

9,662.09 
14,204.35 

6,814.38 
11,808.68 

7,214.38 
10,198.32 
14,848.76 
11,757.52 



-138.92 
1,715.39 
2,016.45 
2,522.22 
2,267.50 
-192.36 
1,792.61 
2,746.21 

2,240.46 
2,386.30 
1,904.54 
-152.76 
2,128.58 



13,399.88 
14,135.18 
12,884.50 
15,652.90 

9,153.00 
18,442.12 
11,454.70 
16,950.56 

6,814.38 
14,049.14 

9,600.68 
12,103.36 
14,696.00 
13,886.10 



North School 

Principal 

Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 



^ A Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 



W 



South Row School 

Principal 

Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 



14,848.76 
16,849.70 
16,849.70 
11,271.30 
13,747.96 
12,343.41 
3,148.56 
13,868.75 
15,504.34 
13,741.52 
16,849.70 
17,055.60 
12,552.60 
13,868.75 
16,849.70 
13,533.27 
13,868.75 
13,868.75 
12,441.37 
14,610.77 
14,968.93 
13,868.75 



26,005.98 

13,868.75 
12,343.41 
18,325.24 
15,903.94 
15,083.94 

3,968.86 
13,419.89 
14,177.74 
13,868.75 
16,849.70 

6,229.96 
16,849.70 
13,533.27 
16,276.32 
13,996.32 
18,325.24 
15,083.94 
16,849.70 
13,868.75 

8,734.07 



-258.96 


14,589.80 


-173.54 


16,676.16 


-173.54 


16,676.16 


2,128.58 


13,399.88 




13,747.96 


2,352.29 


14,696.00 


1,820.00 


4,968.56 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


-159.68 


15,344.66 


2,576.45 


16,317.97 


-173.54 


16,676.97 




17,055.60 


2,345.67 


14,898.28 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


-173.54 


16,676.16 


2,576.54 


16,109.72 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


928.20 


13,369.57 


2,842.85 


17,453.62 


2,862.10 


17,857.03 


2,723.17 


16,591.92 




26,005.98 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


2,352.59 


14,696.00 


-192.36 


18,132.88 


3,048.94 


18,132.88 


2,316.14 


17,400.08 


-125.06 


3,843.80 


2,576.45 


15,996.34 


2,688.56 


16,866.30 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


-173.54 


16,676.16 


2,029.60 


8,259.56 


-173.54 


16,676.16 


2,576.45 


16,109.72 


-166.60 


16,109.72 


2,688.56 


16,684.88 


-192.36 


18,132.88 


3,241.30 


18,325.24 


-173.54 


16,676.16 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


917.81 


9,651.88 



122 



Westlands School 

Principal 

Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 

Highland School 

Principal 

Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 

Elementary 

Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 

Art 

Art 

Art 

Art 

Art 

Art 

Art 

Music 

Music 

Music 

Music 

Music 

Music 



26,005.98 

524.84 
13,868.75 
19,280.25 
13,868.75 
11,682.72 
13,868.75 

3,141.64 
11,623.26 
18,325.24 
18,325.24 
11,808.68 
13,952.94 
13,868.75 
13,912.97 
13,868.75 
13,868.75 
13,868.75 
13,868.75 
13,868.75 
13,868.75 
12,855.64 
12,880.14 
13,868.75 
11,370.24 
11,808.68 

3,558.26 
13,952.90 
11,029.47 
11,386.56 
13,868.75 
14,653.11 

7,083.84 

27,095.90 

11,808.68 
15,452.04 
15,233.83 



15,973.32 
5,635.66 

15,907.52 
15,636.26 

1,255.90 
12,342.93 

4,023.60 

9,662.09 

8,525.47 

12,343.41 

13,868.75 

16,253.51 

3,331.68 

3,517.08 

13,416.89 

10,198.82 

10,386.41 

9,839.30 

13,783.17 

4,385.80 





26,005.98 


1,344.28 


1,869.12 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


2,807.41 


22,087.66 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


848.41 


12,531.13 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


1,156.70 


4,298.34 


-172.06 


11,451.20 


-192.36 


18,132.88 


-192.36 


18,132.88 


1,903.26 


13,711.94 


2,688.56 


16,641.50 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


2,428.81 


16,341.78 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


2,489.02 


15,344.66 


2,464.52 


15,344.66 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


2,280.99 


13,651.23 


2,240.46 


14,049.14 


4,281.25 


7,839.51 


2,688.56 


16,641.46 


2,688.20 


13,717.67 




11,386.56 


2,8074.41 


16,676.16 


2,8005.51 


17,453.62 


889.79 


7,973.63 




27,095.90 


2,240.46 


14,049.14 


3,113.28 


18,565.32 


3,106.59 


18,340.42 


3,360.00 


19,333.32 


1,099.02 


6,734.68 


217.60 


217.60 


3,192.60 


19,100.12 


3,160.60 


18,796.86 


195.00 


1,450.90 


2,352.59 


14,695.52 


1,159.10 


5,182.76 


125.10 


125.10 


1,792.61 


11,454.70 


2,980.95 


11,506.42 


2,352.59 


14,696.00 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


422.65 


16,676.16 




3,331.68 


49.00 


3,566.08 


2,576.45 


15,993.34 


1,904.54 


12,103.36 


1,904.54 


12,290.95 


1,792.61 


11,631.91 


2,266.37 


16,049.54 


-138.92 


4,246.88 



123 



\i 



tf 



% 



ii 



Music 
Music 

Phys. Ed. 
Phys. Ed. 
Phys. Ed. 
Phys. Ed. 
Phys. Ed. 
Phys. Ed. 
Phys. Ed. 
Phys. Ed. 

Reading 
Reading 
Reading 
Reading 
Reading 
Reading 
Reading 
Reading 

IMC 

Program Supervisor 

Elementary Librarian 
Elementary Librarian 
Elementary Librarian 

Teacher 

Core Evaluation Team 

CET Chairperson 
CET Chairperson 
CET Chairperson 
Psychologist 

Title I 

Aide 

Aide 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Clerk 

Aide 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Director 

Special Education 

Director 
Asst. Director 

Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 



10,386.41 
10,280.24 

13,547.30 
10,736.05 
13,884.51 
14,229.65 
16,083.94 
13,297.40 
16,904.45 
843.11 

672.00 
18,325.24 
15,650.24 
15,636.26 
15,083.94 
15,083.94 
4,391.57 
15,636.26 

23,983.37 

9,651.74 

953.00 

15,087.08 

6,229.96 



18,376.02 
20,150.21 
18,978.17 
19,185.03 



3,385.61 
2,116.00 

10,019.03 
9,718.94 
3,175.44 
2,116.00 
9,718.94 
9,718.94 
9,718.94 

17,716.12 

27,048.97 
22,722.83 

12.884.50 
14,701.41 
15,266.22 
13,868.75 
14,224.63 
15,083.94 
12,647.04 

4,454.78 
10,320.51 
15,194.72 

3,558.26 

9,235.46 

7,318.15 

15,220.10 

11,808.68 

10,198.82 



145.84 



29.72 



52.00 



149.50 



200.36 



1,904.54 


12,290.95 


1,939.84 


12,220.08 


2,128.58 


15,675.88 


2,128.58 


15,675.88 


2,980.95 


16,865.46 


2,915.79 


17,146.64 


3,048.94 


19,132.38 


2,450.66 


15,748.06 


2,400.68 


19,305.13 




843.00 


1,329.80 


2,001.80 


-192.36 


18,132.88 


3,360.00 


19,910.24 


3,160.60 


18,796.86 


3,048.94 


18,132.88 


3,048.94 


18,132.88 


2,692.40 


7,083.97 


3,160.60 


18,796.86 




23,983.37 


1,367.96 


11,019.70 




953.00 




15,232.92 


1,857.55 


8,087.51 


3,517.85 


21,893.87 


2,814.28 


22,964.49 


2,814.28 


21,792.45 


2,706.60 


21.891.63 




3,385.61 




2,116.00 




10.019.03 




9,718.94 




3,175.44 


1,104.00 


3,220.00 




9,718.94 




9,718.94 


-52.98 


9,695.68 


34.61 


17,750.73 




27,048.97 




22,722.83 


-132.00 


12,804.50 


2,352.59 


17,054.00 


-166.60 


15,099.62 


2,807.41 


16,676.16 


2,706.12 


17,080.25 


3,048.94 


18,132.88 




12,647.04 


687.70 


5,142.48 


1,904.50 


12,425.41 


2,912.42 


18,107.14 


-118.14 


3,440.12 


111.91 


111.91 


1,877.46 


11,112.92 


2,490.07 


9,808.22 


2,912.42 


18,132.52 


2,240.46 


14,049.14 


1,904.54 


12,103,36 



124 



Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 

Substitute 

Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 



Teacher 

Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 



4,392.33 
3,760.41 

17,496.48 

4,41^.20 

2,712.40 

3,438.64 

11,825.58 

6,095.20 

12,343.41 

14,653.11 

15,650.24 

11,808.68 

10,745.05 

9,662.09 

18,551.92 

15,205.42 

8,196.93 

15,650.24 

11,808.68 



4,737.08 


9,129.41 


-118.14 


3,642.00 


642.70 


642.70 


-416.18 


17,080.30 


2,261.95 


6,677.15 




2,712.40 




3,438.64 


2,386.30 


14,211.88 




6,095.20 


2,522.85 


14,866.26 


2,800.51 


17,453.62 


3,360.00 


19,010.24 


2,240.46 


14,049.14 


2,016.45 


12,761.50 


1,792.61 


11,454.70 




18,551.92 


3,241.30 


18,446.72 


2,743.05 


10,939.98 


3,360.00 


19,010.24 


2,173.02 


13,981.70 


884.00 


884.00 


598.00 


598.00 


182.00 


182.00 


234.00 


234.00 


985.00 


985.00 


221.00 


221.00 


286.00 


286.00 


882.00 


882.00 


546.00 


546.00 


156.00 


156.00 


819.00 


819.00 


5,630.54 


5,630.54 


344.10 


344.10 


3,126.00 


3,126.00 


130.00 


130.00 


895.18 


895.18 


1,716.00 


1,716.00 


470.00 


470.00 


461.00 


461.00 


102.15 


102.15 


104.00 


104.00 


611.00 


611.00 


140.00 


140.00 


150.00 


150.00 


150.00 


150.00 


1,637.00 


1,637.00 


182.00 


182.00 


182.00 


182.00 


104.00 


104.00 


257.00 


257.00 


150.00 


150.00 


126.86 


126.86 


500.00 


500.00 


104.00 


104.00 


197.84 


197.84 


182.00 


182.00 


4,061,66 


4,061.66 


260.00 


260.00 


2,873.00 


2,873.00 


364.00 


364.00 


1,404.00 


1,404.00 


286.00 


286.00 



125 



Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
itute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
itute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
itute Teacher 
itute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
itute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
tute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
bstitute Teacher 
itute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 



Sut 
Sut 



Su 

Subst 

Su 



Su 

Su 

Su 

Su 

Su 

Subst 

Su 

Su 

Su 

Sut 

Sut 



Substiti 
Substiti 
Su 
Su 

Su 



Substiti 
Su 

Su 



Sut 
Sub 
Substi 
Sut 



Sub 
Substi 



1,434.00 



1,085.28 


1,085.28 


286.00 


286.00 


104.00 


104.00 


1,768.00 


1,768.00 


533.00 


533.00 


104.00 


104.00 


104.00 


104.00 


71.50 


71.50 


2,392.00 


2,392.00 


156.00 


156.00 


130.00 


130.00 


338.00 


338.00 


1,638.00 


1,638.00 


247.00 


247.00 


221.00 


221.00 


1,001.00 


1,001.00 


416.00 


416.00 


260.00 


260.00 


104.00 


104.00 


1,014.00 


1,014.00 


169.00 


169.00 


78.00 


78.00 


78.00 


78.00 


208.00 


208.00 


754.00 


754.00 


1,690.00 


1,690.00 


656.00 


656.00 


5,121.66 


5,121.66 




1,434.00 


624.00 


624.00 


767.00 


767.00 


130.00 


130.00 


208.00 


208.00 


251.20 


251.20 


1,430.00 


1,430.00 


104.00 


104.00 


4,483.00 


4,483.00 


130.00 


130.00 


1,053.00 


1,053.00 


156.00 


156.00 


2,873.00 


2,873.00 


553.00 


553.00 


104.00 


014.00 


104.00 


014.00 


494.00 


494.00 


533.00 


533.00 


400.26 


400.26 


1,469.00 


1,469.00 


364.00 


364.00 


104.00 


104.00 


546.00 


546.00 


400.00 


400.00 


169.00 


169.00 


1,014.00 


1,014.00 


551.00 


551.00 


208.00 


208.00 


65.00 


65.00 


208.00 


208.00 


2,877.30 


2,877.30 


2,080.00 


2,080.00 


156.00 


156.00 


104.00 


104.00 


1,404.00 


1,404.00 


78.00 


78..00 



126 



Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 
Substitute Teacher 



1,222.50 



78.00 



237.25 



390.00 


390.00 


104.00 


104.00 


253.00 


253.00 


3,594.79 


4,817.29 


208.00 


208.00 


312.00 


312.00 


195.00 


195.00 


3,063.50 


3,063.50 


102.00 


102.00 


1,785.00 


1,785.00 


767.00 


767.00 


208.00 


208.00 


2,210.00 


2,210.00 


130.00 


130.00 


2,434.56 


2,434.56 


2,054.00 


2,054.00 


161.00 


161.00 


650.00 


650.00 


300.00 


300.00 


78.00 


78.00 


78.00 


78.00 


182.00 


182.00 


325.00 


325.00 


954.00 


954.00 


662.00 


662.00 


202.32 


202.32 


104.00 


104.00 


129.12 


129.12 


104.00 


104.00 


1,001.00 


1,001.00 


104.00 


104.00 


405.00 


405.00 


273.00 


273.00 


3,561.00 


3,561.00 


208.00 


208.00 


286.00 


286.00 


208.00 


208.00 


2,574.00 


2,652.00 


522.00 


522.00 


104.00 


104.00 


390.00 


390.00 


2,629.00 


2, 629.00 


156.00 


156.00 


2,319.45 


2,319.45 


6,367.11 


6,367.11 


104.00 


104.00 


156.00 


156.00 


260.00 


260.00 


156.00 


156.00 


117.00 


117.00 


468.00 


468.00 


234.00 


234.00 


104.00 


104.00 


634.09 


634.09 


698.00 


698.00 


208.00 


208.00 


78.00 


78.00 


156.00 


156.00 


4,013.17 


4,250.42 


260.00 


260.00 


367.50 


367.50 


78.00 


78.00 


468.00 


468.00 


390.00 


390.00 



127 



Tutor 

Tutor / 

Tutor 

Tutor 

Tutor 

Tutor 

Tutor 

I Attendance Officer 

Director School 
/ Management Services 

Secretaries 

Payroll 

Administration 
Administration 
Payroll 

Administration 
Bookkeeping 
Administration 
Administration 
Bookkeeping 
Bookkeeping 
Administration 
Administration 
Payroll 
Payroll 

Administration 
Curriculum Secretary 
Curriculum Secretary 
Curriculum Secretary 
High School Secretary 
High School Secretary 
High School Secretary 
High School Secretary 
High School Secretary 
High School Secretary 
Guidance Secretary 
Parker - Secretary 
Parker - Secretary 
McCarthy - Secretary 
McCarthy - Secretary 
McCarthy - Secretary 
Byam School Secretary 
Byam School Secretary 
Center School Secretary 
Harrington School-Sec. 
Harrington School-Sec. 
Highland School-Sec. 
North School-Secretary 
South Row - Secretary 
Westlands - Secretary 
Westlands - Secretary 
McFarlin - Secretary 
IMC - Secretary 
School Committee-Sec. 
Sp. Ed. - Secretary 
Sp. Ed. - Secretary 
Calls Sub-teachers 

Sub -secretary. 
Sub-secretary ^ 

Sub-secretary \ 

Sub -secretary 
Sub -secretary 



18,999.89 




24,643.45 




4,834.63 


632.57 


5,469.10 


24.00 


10,006.80 


1,459.45 


8,750.25 


60.18 


9,645.65 


131.58 


1,215.00 




11,212.50 


158.12 


9,106.50 


229.00 


10,940.80 


394.28 


7,804.00 




7,892.30 


72.15 


7,788.20 


17.85 


3,171.00 




9,573.20 




9,713.60 




1,407.25 




8,145.80 




6,954.33 




7,008.40 


145.12 


6,954.35 




6,954.33 




9,517.25 




6,954.35 




8,050.25 




8,889.40 




7,385.30 




6,912.80 


93.37 


7,835.30 


28.12 


9,431.40 


33.87 


6,507.80 


27.00 


7,385.95 


38.32 


8,728.20 




4,167.80 




7,385.95 


76.62 


6,215.30 




7,385.95 


98.34 


7,718.10 


38.32 


7,668.82 




6,507.80 




4,396.60 




7,892.30 




1,787.17 




8,796.90 


561.28 



4,628.80 



982.50 


982.50 


2,195.60 


2,195.60 


208.00 


208.00 


1,489.53 


1,489.53 


330.00 


330.00 


130.00 


130.00 


221.00 


221.00 




18,999.89 


100.00 


24,743.45 


2,904.16 


8,371.36 


-211.82 


5,281.28 


579.94 


579.94 


-11.20 


11,455.05 


-9.75 


8,800.68 


.12 


9,777.35 


151.87 


1,366.87 


84.85 


11,454.87 


-10.51 


9,324.99 


-12.76 


11,322.32 


695.60 


8,499.60 


-260.26 


7,704.19 


95.90 


7,901.95 




3,171.00 


-11.20 


9,562.00 


-12.20 


9,701.40 


2,091.22 


3,498.47 


-18.86 


8,126.94 


343.93 


7,298.28 


337.40 


7,490.92 


459.87 


7,414.22 


213.65 


7,168.00 


-340.38 


9,176.87 


178.48 


7,132.83 


322.39 


8,372.64 


-10.40 


8,879.00 


-8.45 


7,376.85 


-246.35 


6,759.82 


-8.45 


7,854.97 


-10.40 


9,454.87 


430.30 


6,965.10 


349.60 


7,773.87 


-26.56 


8,701.64 


-290.81 


3,876.99 


-42.97 


7,419.60 


-37.70 


6,177.60 


443.53 


7,927.82 


-226.65 


7,529.77 


1,478.76 


9,147.58 


20.80 


6,528.60 


322.39 


4,718.99 


-9.11 


7,883.19 




1,787.17 


10.49 


9,368.67 


3,572.07 


3,572.07 


-156.27 


4,472.53 


110.70 


110.70 


66.25 


66.25 


158.10 


158.10 


543.61 


543.61 


73.62 


73.62 



128 



Sub-secretary 
Sub -secretary 
Sub-secretary 
Sub -secretary 
Sub -secretary 
Sub-secretary 
Sub-secretary 
Sub-secretary 



3,458.65 



Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod: 
Custod 
Custod: 
Custod 
Custod: 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod: 
Custod: 
Custod: 
Custod 
Custod: 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 
Custod 



11,201.71 


443.62 


11,679.20 


17.22 


10,909.60 


726.11 


11,201.71 


200.51 


10,576.80 


46.13 


10,576.80 


64.53 


10,576.80 


96.72 


11,201.71 


228.40 


14,000.87 




10,576.80 


1,605.39 


10,576.80 


548.30 


11,534.51 


633.12 


7,242.40 


464.08 


7,893.60 


168.68 


10,244.00 


108.00 


5,952.00 


450.00 


10,244.00 


659.46 


2,384.00 


141.59 


10,244.00 




10,244.00 


663.10 


10,244.00 


73.11 


10,244.00 


984.85 


10,244.00 


199.72 


10,576.80 


364.24 


10,244.00 


2,053.57 


10,576.80 


239.22 


10,244.00 


1,337.17 


10,244.00 


123.13 


10,244.00 


681.68 


2,828.00 


277.91 


10,244.00 


1,121.49 


10,576.80 


668.69 


10,244.00 


34.90 


10,244.00 


550.90 


10,244.00 


900.42 


10,244.00 


895.27 


6,020.00 


705.52 


10,244.00 


200.61 


10,244.00 


1,475.41 


10,244.00 


755.90 


10,333.60 


196.61 


10,244.00 


200.94 


7,242.40 


96.72 


10,244.00 


623.67 


10,576.80 


46.87 


10,244.00 


950.51 


9,840.00 




10,244.00 


87.51 


10,576.00 


1,474.24 


10,461.60 


348.19 


10,244.00 


339.17 


10,576.80 


526.82 


3,840.00 




10,244.00 


592.75 



103.95 


103.95 


159.00 


159.00 


295.80 


3,754.45 


1,385.64 


1,385.64 


531.31 


531.31 


2,262.94 


2,262.94 


246.94 


246.94 


523.36 


523.36 


-10.97 


11,634.36 


-10.00 


11,686.42 


-255.76 


11,379.95 


-10.97 


11,391.25 


-10.00 


10,612.93 


-10.00 


10,631.33 


-10.00 


10,663.52 


-10.97 


11,419.14 


1,792.00 


1,792.00 




14,000.87 


-10.00 


12,172.19 


-10.00 


11,115.10 


-10.97 


12,156.66 


-51.58 


7,654.80 


-10.00 


8,052.28 


-10.00 


10,342.00 


-32.40 


6,370.50 


-10.00 


10,893.46 


1,557.44 


4,083.03 


-10.00 


10,234.00 


-10.00 


10,897.10 


-10.00 


10,307.11 


-10.00 


11,218.85 


-10.00 


10,433.72 


-10.00 


10,931.04 


-10.00 


12,287.57 


-10.00 


10.806.02 


-10.00 


11,571.17 


-10.00 


10,357.13 


-10.00 


10,915.68 


1,241.76 


4,347.67 


-10.00 


11,235.49 


-10.00 


11,235.49 


-165.60 


10,113.30 


-10.00 


10,784.90 


-33.46 


11,110.96 


-10.00 


11,129.27 


3,273.20 


9,998.72 


-10.00 


10,434.61 


10.00 


11,709.41 


-10.00 


10,989.90 


2.80 


10,533.01 


-10.00 


10,434.94 


-51.68 


7,287.44 


-10.00 


10,857.67 


-10.00 


10,613.67 


-10.00 


11,184.51 


20.20 


9,860.20 


-10.00 


10,321.51 


-10.00 


12,041.04 


-10.00 


10,799.79 


-10.00 


10,573.17 


-10.00 


11,093.62 




3,840.00 


-10.00 


10,826.75 



129 





Custodian 


10,244.00 


884.02 




Custodian 


2,777.60 


74.40 


(/ 


Custodian 


10,244.00 


570.18 


Custodian 


5,689.60 


509.60 




Custodian 


4,224.00 


718.14 




Custodian 


10,244.00 


1,247.08 




Substitute Custodian 


1,382.40 






Substitute Custodian 








Substitute Custodian 








Substitute Custodian 








Substitute Custodian 








Substitute Custodian 




311.04 




Substitute Custodian 






n 


Substitute Custodian 






1 V 


Substitute Custodian 








Substitute Custodian 








Substitute Custodian 




291.20 




Substitute Custodian 








Substitute Custodian 








Substitute Custodian 








Substitute Custodian 








Substitute Custodian 




69.12 




Substitute Custodian 








A/V 






l\ 


Aide 


5,752.00 


59.25 


> 


Aide 
IMC 


2,192.80 




5 


Cataloguer 


8,699.01 




Graphic Artist 


9,434.24 






Technician 


14,317.30 






A/V Aide 








A/V Aide 








A/V Aide 






7 


A/V Aide 






A/V Aide 








A/V Aide 








A/V Aide 







a 



Food Service Director 

School Physician 
School Physician 
School Physician 

Nurse 
Nurse 
Nurse 
Nurse 
Nurse 
Nurse 
Nurse 
Nurse 
Nurse 
Nurse 

Substitute Nurse 
Substitute Nurse 
Substitute Nurse 
Substitute Nurse 
Substitute Nurse 
Substitute Nurse 
Substitute Nurse 
Substitute Nurse 
Substitute Nurse 



13,799.89 



4,729.57 
5,841.67 
5,841.67 
8,068.66 
4,729.57 
2,891.46 
9,316.92 
10,958.26 
7,555.02 
5,841.67 



102.87 



-10.00 


11,118.03 




2,852.00 


-10.00 


10,804.18 


1,907.32 


8,106.52 


426.67 


5,368.81 


-10.00 


11,481.08 


2,178.48 


3,560.88 


1,824.00 


1,824.00 


364.00 


364.00 


182.00 


182.00 


1,440.00 


1,440.00 


864.00 


11,175.04 


1,046.20 


1,046.20 


509.60 


509.60 


196.32 


196.32 


364.00 


364.00 


3,666.20 


3,957.40 


2,668.00 


2,668.00 


928.00 


928.00 


69.12 


69.12 


69.12 


69.12 


518.40 


587.52 


2,284.00 


2,284.00 


16.00 


5,827.25 


119.68 


2,312.48 


59.55 


8,758.56 


64.38 


9,498.62 




14,317.30 


395.05 


395.05 


786.00 


786.00 


100.70 


100.70 


2,561.32 


2,561.32 


197.42 


197.42 


124.55 


124.55 


1,089.15 


1,089.15 




13,799.89 


1,500.00 


1,500.00 


4,500.00 


4,500.00 


1,500.00 


1,500.00 


1,147.35 


5,876.92 


35.25 


5,876.92 


3.82 


5,485.49 


1,881.70 


9,950.36 


1,147.35 


5,876.92 


1,112.10 


4,003.56 


-199.16 


9,117.76 




11,061.13 


1,659.58 


9,214.60 


35.25 


5,876.92 


1,310.40 


1,310.40 


2,524.90 


2,524.90 


176.40 


176.40 


529.20 


529.20 


226.80 


226.80 


604.80 


604.80 


151.20 


151.20 


618.40 


618.40 


1,593.05 


1,593.05 



130 



Aides — Library, Teacher 
and Substitutes 

Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 



1,165.86 


1,165.86 


2,342.83 


3,342.83 


3,614.35 


3,614.35 


3,992.96 


3,992.96 


2,304.94 


2,304.94 


2,677.80 


2,677.80 


3,005.34 


3,005.34 


1,930.10 


1,930.10 


605.41 


605.41 


3,448.19 


3,448.19 


414.08 


414.08 


1,804.93 


1,804.93 


2,024.02 


2,024.02 


2,908.90 


2,908.90 


3,675.40 


3,675.40 


2,486.40 


2,486.40 


2,646.45 


2,646.45 


2,648.25 


2,648.25 


1,436.04 


1,436.04 


1,890.99 


1,890.99 


73.75 


73.75 


2,230.60 


2,230.60 


1,336.95 


1,336.95 


239.27 


239.27 


2,702.00 


2,702.00 


353.22 


353.22 


814.71 


814.71 


69.82 


69.82 


1,957.39 


1,957.39 


5,964.40 


5,964.40 


533.60 


533.60 


2,509.35 


2,509.35 


794.46 


794.46 


3,750.05 


3,750.05 


1,491.19 


1,419.19 


2,184.00 


2,184.00 


90.06 


90.06 


169.16 


169.16 


2,661.04 


2,661.04 


2,805.40 


2,805.40 


1,317.92 


1,317.92 


2,339.83 


2,339.83 


1,821.66 


1,821.66 


1,379.87 


1,379.87 


2,242.20 


2,242.20 


296.24 


296.24 


2,213.10 


2,213.10 


61.20 


61.20 


2,608.90 


2,608.90 


2,186.18 


2,186.18 


2,769.05 


2,769.05 


2,673.47 


2,673.47 


1,308.75 


1,308.75 


532.70 


532.70 


1,875.00 


1,875.00 


5,132.59 


5,132.59 


1,675.05 


1,675.05 


1,615.64 


1,615.64 


2,661.91 


2,611.91 


339.30 


339.30 


2,815.59 


2,815.59 


3,888.93 


3,888.93 



131 



Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 



vy 



5,244.20 


5,244.20 


2,670.83 


2,670.83 


5,115.62 


5.115.62 


2,340.55 


2,340.55 


139.16 


139.16 


2,665.25 


2,665.25 


1,114.02 


1,114.02 


3,363.60 


3,363.60 


3,207.19 


3,207.19 


3,860.40 


3,860.40 


2,608.11 


2,608.11 


114.48 


114.48 


119.78 


119.78 


3,795.20 


3,795.20 


516.00 


516.00 


832.61 


832.61 


1,740.47 


1,740.47 


2,227.70 


2,227.70 


2,253.11 


2,253.11 


3,558.25 


3,558.25 


2,178.97 


2,178.97 


949.68 


949.68 


2,631.66 


2,631.66 


454.31 


454.31 


4,576.35 


4,576.35 


87.00 


87.00 


2,256.68 


2,256.68 


1,204.00 


1,204.00 


2,558.82 


2,558.82 


1,847.84 


1,847.84 


1,310.52 


1,310.52 


3,017.70 


3,017.70 


2,908.39 


2,908.39 


87.00 


87.00 


199.40 


199.40 


2,296.67 


2,296.67 


2,756.65 


2,756.65 


2,108.60 


2,108.60 


149.59 


149.59 


2,438.33 


2,438.22 


3,578.48 


3,578.48 


2,134.28 


2,134.28 


3,245.27 


3,245.27 


87.00 


87.00 


189.02 


189.02 


3,493.05 


3,493.05 


1,768.53 


1,768.53 


3,228.81 


3,228.81 


2,801.11 


2,801.11 


559.00 


559.00 


1,017.20 


1,017.20 


3,563.80 


3,563.80 


337.50 


337.50 


1,632.04 


1,632.04 


2,962.21 


2,962.21 


1,019.59 


1,019.59 


2,827.80 


2,827.80 


142.00 


142.00 


513.30 


513.30 


992.64 


992.64 


176.08 


176.08 


216.00 


216.00 


3,253.76 


3,253.76 


1,301.35 


1,301.35 



132 



Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 

Adult Education 

Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 

Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 



2,865.31 


2,865.31 


4,981.74 


4,981.74 


4,919.95 


4,919.95 


285.74 


285.74 


1,386.48 


1,386.48 


3,820.76 


3,820.76 


1,005.50 


1,005.50 


1,411.54 


1,411.54 


87.00 


87.00 


4,083.50 


4,083.50 


258.00 


258.00 


2,546.37 


2,546.37 


625.01 


625.01 


2,752.60 


2,752.60 


381.41 


391.41 


2,617.80 


2,617.80 


3,349.76 


3,349.76 


2,957.71 


2,957.71 


2,633.30 


2,633.30 


2,713.85 


2,713.85 


1,933.90 


1,933.90 


1,120.50 


1,120.50 


2,977.35 


2,977.35 


366.50 




1,103.00 


1,103.00 


543.00 


543.00 


1,140.00 


1,140.00 


1,127.00 


1,127.00 


330.00 


330.00 


288.00 


288.00 


1,103.00 


1,103.00 


451.75 


451.75 


941.35 


941.35 


536.00 


536.00 


30.00 


30.00 


1,055.00 


1,055.00 


30.00 


30.00 


1,127.00 


1,127.00 


815.00 


815.00 


800.00 


800.00 


161.50 


161.50 


113.75 


113.75 


1,250.00 


1,250.00 


17.00 


17.00 


1,127.00 


1,127.00 


170.00 


170.00 


248.75 


248.75 


184.00 


184.00 


229.50 


229.50 


1,127.00 


1,127.00 


1,103.00 


1,103.00 


1,079.00 


1,079.00 


264.00 


264.00 


212.50 


212.50 


160.00 


160.00 


851.25 


851.25 


231.54 


231.54 


54.48 


54.48 


858.06 


858.06 


844.44 


844.44 


871.68 


871.68 


824.85 


824.85 



133 



Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards (j 1 




Crossing Guards 1 
Crossing Guards ' 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 




Food Service — Aides, 




Managers and 
Substitutes 




Cafeteria Aide r 




Manager < 

Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Manager „_— — - ' 
Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 1/ 


■^ 


Cafeteria Aide 


Cafeteria Aide M 


0+ 


Cafeteria Aide J** 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 


\ 


Cafeteria Aide - 


1 


Secretary -""-""" 
Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 


-L 


Cafeteria Aide 


\%*^ 


Cafeteria Aide 


Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 




Cafeteria Aide 





7,019.84 



5,235.98 




5,812.80 



749.10 


749.10 


54.48 


54.48 


54.48 


54.48 


789.96 


789.96 


853.52 


853.53 


531.18 


531.18 


81.72 


81.72 


211.11 


211.11 


817.20 


817.20 



195.64 


195.64 


-90.98 


6,928.86 


2,054.40 


2,054.40 


3,926.76 


3,926.76 


95.14 


95.14 


3,683.40 


3,683.40 


176.92 


176.92 


3,404.73 


3,404.73 


176.92 


5,412.90 


3,404.73 


3,404.73 


3,583.80 


3,583.80 


3,912.52 


3,912.52 


3,503.10 


3,503.10 


3,673.68 


3,673.68 


3,192.36 


3,192.36 


3,002.79 


3,002.79 


2,896.26 


2,896.26 


3,663.60 


3,663.60 


3,625.74 


3,625.74 


3,275.64 


3,275.64 


2,023.08 


2,023.08 


3,057.54 


3,057.54 


3,204.60 


3,204.60 


1,737.02 


1,737.02 


171.55 


171.55 


2,080.56 


2,080.56 


3,700.56 


3,700.56 


131.32 


131.32 


2,161.89 


2,161.89 


669.36 


669.36 


3,701.79 


3,701.79 


3,574.14 


3,574.14 


3,834.06 


3,834.06 


1,059.46 


1,059.46 


970.70 


970.70 


255.94 


255.94 


1,720.82 


1,720.82 


3,673.68 


3,673.68 


2,784.06 


2,784.06 


2,264.24 


2,264.24 


3,035.13 


3,035.13 


3,113.01 


3,113.01 


3,040.59 


3,040.59 


1,008.68 


1,008.68 


99.16 


99.16 


100.50 


100.50 


3,643.09 


3,643.09 


3,177.12 


3,177.12 


3,661.92 


3,661.92 


2,052.64 


2,052.64 


2,522.77 


2,522.77 



134 



Cafeteria Aide 



C Manager 
*^ I Manager 



5,943.32 
6,066.32 



Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Asst. Director 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 

- Manager 
Cafeteria Aide 
Manager 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 

""Manager 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Bookkeeper 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Manager 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 

-Manager 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 

^Manager 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 



u 




4,783.00 



6,066.32 



6,335.36 



7,255.80 



6,066.32 



7,030.16 



5,704.28 



1,190.09 


1,190.09 


-399.63 


5,543.69 


-343.84 


5,722.48 


304.18 


304.18 


1,288.84 


1,288.84 


3,297.21 


3,297.27 


3,325.25 


3,325.25 


3,647.10 


3,647.10 


92.32 


10.207.58 


2,292.60 


2,292.60 


3,663.60 


3,663.60 


2,997.06 


2,997.06 


3,673.68 


3,673.68 


3,420.38 


3,420.38 


1,547.22 


1,547.22 


1,711.20 


1,711.20 


2,314.01 


2,314.01 


3,333.42 


3,333.42 


687.69 


687.69 


413.15 


413.15 


454.92 


454.92 


228.14 


228.14 


3,673.68 


3,673.68 


1,127.48 


5,910.48 


75.04 


75.04 


-348.38 


5,717.94 


3,663.60 


3,663.60 


1,933.58 


1,933.58 


351.33 


351.33 


3,026.60 


3,026.60 


3,599.76 


3,599.76 


3,663.85 


3,663.85 


346.36 


346.36 


743.24 


743.24 


2,114.91 


2,114.91 


2,897.57 


2,897.57 


-79.54 


6,255.82 


3,952.86 


3,952.86 


135.34 


135.34 


385.92 


385.92 


2,131.44 


2,131.44 


344.76 


7,600.56 


1,235.85 


1,235.85 


3,717.36 


3,717.36 


-348.38 


5,717.94 


2,112.18 


2,112.18 


741.84 


741.84 


3,663.60 


3,663.60 


586.79 


586.79 


2,988.90 


2,988.90 


5,217.17 


5,217.17 


3,356.04 


3,356.04 


2,077.30 


2,077.30 


2,563.78 


2,563.78 


2,481.96 


2,481.96 


2,469.04 


5,235.24 


3,965.02 


3,965.02 


2,801.91 


2,901.91 



INDEX 



Appointed Town Officials 3 

Board of Appeals 82 

Board of Assessors 80 

Board of Registrars 97 

Board of Selectmen 7 

Cable Television Advisory Committee 98 

Celebrations Committee 96 

Cemetery Commission 84 

Civil Defense Commission 78 

Conservation Commission 89 

Council on Aging 91 

Department of Veterans' Services 81 

Dog Officer 89 

Elected Town Officials 3 

Environmental Advisory Council 93 

Fire Department 79 

Gas Inspector 88 

General Information 2 

Health Department 80 

Highway Department 77 

Historical Commission 96 

Historic District Commission 97 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 93 

Housing Authority 95 

Insect Pest Control Department 90 

Inspector of Animals 89 

Inspector of Buildings 98 

Jury List 10 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School 75 

Northern Middlesex Area Commission 94 

Park Commission 85 

Planning Board 83 

Plumbing Inspector 88 

Police Department 76 

Public Libraries 83 

Recreation Commission 85 

School Committee 62 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 88 

Sewer Commission 96 

SHARE Incorporated 86 

Town Accountant 100 

Town Aide 90 

Town Clerk 9 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting April 1, 1978 and April 24, 1978 11 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting May 11, 1978 20 

Results Annual Town Election April 1, 1978 22 

Annual Town Meeting April 24, 1978 24 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting April 26, 1978 30 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 1 1 , 1 978 36 

Special Town Meetingjune 29, 1978 45 

Warrant for Special Town Meetingjune 29, 1978 49 

Town Warrant for State Primary 51 

Democratic State Primary 53 

Republican State Primary 54 

American State Primary 55 

Town Warrant for State Election November 7, 1978 57 

Special Town Meeting November 30, 1978 57 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting November 30, 1978 58 

Adjourned Special Town Meeting December 6, 1978 60 

Town Employees' Salaries 105 



Treasurer and Tax Collector 99 

Tree Department 90 

Varney Playground/Edwards Beach 98 

Veterans' Emergency Fund 82 

Wire Inspector 88 

Youth Center 86 



This report was prepared from individual imputs from all Town departments and 
committees and coordinated by the Board of Selectmen. The funds, $10,000 were 
appropriated at the 1978 Annual Town Meeting as line item 257 under Unclassified 
Departments. Each booklet cost $1.52.